"How Did Americans Learn to Trust Processed Food?"

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How did we learn to trust food in opaque packages? In her new book, Canned: The Rise and Fall of Consumer Confidence in the American Food Industry, Dr. Anna Zeide reveals the answers through the story of the canning industry, taking us on a journey to understand how food industry leaders leveraged the powers of science, marketing, and politics to win over a reluctant public, even as consumers resisted at every turn.

A Lecture by Sam Lovejoy

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Getting Your Passion Going to Save the Planet: A Lecture by Sam Lovejoy

From Thoreau to contemporary passive resistance movements, Sam Lovejoy will discuss political philosophy and his experiences as one of the leading environmental activists of our time. Sam Lovejoy was a founder of the non-violent, direct action NO NUKES movement. In 1974 he knocked over a 500-foot weather tower in his home town of Montague, MA, to protest a planned nuclear power plant project. He immediately turned himself into the police, and handed the sergeant a 4-page statement taking full responsibility for his actions. He was indicted for a felony and stood trial, defending himself without a lawyer. He was acquitted by the judge after an 8-day trial. Thus began the opposition to nuclear plants being built throughout the country and the world.

Anthropology and Sociology

An Evening with Werner Herzog

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The Film and Media Studies program at Rhodes College presents a public screening of Werner Herzog’s THE WILD BLUE YONDER (2005), followed by a Q&A session with the legendary filmmaker himself. 

THE WILD BLUE YONDER tells the story of an alien species seeking refuge on earth while humans are looking for other worlds to colonize. Though the film announces itself as a “science fiction fantasy,” its combination of mesmerizing footage from NASA missions and underwater exploration in Antarctica with originally produced material defies easy categorization. It offers a haunting meditation on eco-conservation, on longing for home, and on what being an alien really means. It won the FIPRESCI Award at the Venice Film Festival in 2005.

Werner Herzog is among the most daring, influential, and prolific contemporary filmmakers. He emerged as a creative force from the New German Cinema and has earned international critical acclaim with epics like AGUIRRE, THE WRATH OF GOD (1972) and FITZCARRALDO (1982) as well as documentaries like FATA MORGANA (1971), LITTLE DIETER NEEDS TO FLY (1997), and GRIZZLY MAN (2005). Spectacular and perplexing, Herzog’s films are set in unique landscapes that become reflections of emotional states; they blur distinctions between reality and fiction and are often populated by mad men and women at psychological extremes. As Roger Ebert once put it, Herzog is among a handful of directors who “keep the movies vibrating.”

This event is free and open to the public, but tickets are required. Tickets are available to the Rhodes community at Rhodes Express and to the public at Novel bookstore, located at 387 Perkins Extd. 

Film and Media Studies

Peter Soppelsa: Nature & Technology in Paris' Waterscape, 1870-1914

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How do nature and technology shape where water flows?  How do they affect who has access to it? Using Paris as a case-study, Soppelsa examines the city's "waterscape" to investigate the place of water in society during a period where how Parisians used their water changed dramatically and became highly politicized.  He raises fundamental questions about how humans and non-humans make ecological change.  Soppelsa's talk resonates with today's debates on "water wars," water infrastructure, and water pollution.