The Art of Narrative in Law & Medicine panel w/Dr. Ricardo Nuila, Baylor College of Medicine & Vishal Agraharkar, ACLU of Virginia

Event date

Contact person: Chanelle Benz

Dr. Christopher Blunt will moderate a panel on the importance of writing, literature, and a liberal arts education to careers in medicine and law, featuring Dr. Ricardo Nuila of Baylor College of Medicine and Vishal Agraharkar of the ACLU of Virginia. 

English

Quinn Slobodian, From the End of Empire to the End of Neoliberalism?: The Alt-Globalization of the Right-Wing Backlash

Event date

Contact person: Jonathan Judaken

Drawing upon his much-touted book, Globalists, Quinn Slobodian will trace the development of neo-liberalism and explore its consequences for the rise of the populist right. The 1990s saw the culmination of a decades-long project of neoliberal globalism with the creation of institutions from the WTO to the EU and NAFTA designed to lock in free trade and capital rights.  Since 2016, these institutions have come under attack, leading some to diagnose the death of neoliberalism. But the obituary might be premature. Through examples from Trump’s trade team to Brexit to the German right, Slobodian suggests that the current right-wing backlash proposes not a rejection of globalization but an alternative form of it, not a departure from dynamics of capitalist competition but their deepening.

A 5:30 p.m. reception will precede the talk. This event is free and open to the public.

English
Rhodes Lecture Board

Sing Diversity: The Songwriting Project

Event date

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Contact person: Carole Blankenship
Phone:

Sing Diversity is a two-hour interactive workshop that uses the songwriting process to create dialogue around diversity and inclusion. The songs that are written and recorded during this workshop become powerful musical outreach tools.

All students are welcome to participate.

The Songwriting Project was founded by Chrisie Santoni and Craig Smith, whose song “Deluxe” is featured in the Emmy-nominated HBO documentary Paycheck To Paycheck: The Life and Times of Katrina Gilbert. 
 

English
New Student Programs

Documentary Screening: Michael Caplan's ALGREN

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Contact person: Rashna Richards
Phone:

The Film and Media Studies Program at Rhodes College invites you to a screening of Michael Caplan’s ALGREN, a riveting documentary about the National Book Award-winning writer Nelson Algren. Known as “the bard of the down-and-outer,” Algren portrayed the grittier side of Chicago. His books are about drunks and pimps and prostitutes and junkies, and they capture a sense of raw, unsentimental alienation from life. Ernest Hemingway considered Algren second only to William Faulkner in the canon of American writers.

Caplan’s documentary premiered at the Chicago International Film Festival in 2014. It has received rave reviews. The Hollywood Reporter praises the way it “weaves together Algren’s life in an absorbing blend of interviews, voiceovers and, most compellingly, a trove of Art Shay photographs.”

Michael Caplan is an Associate Professor in the Cinema and Television Arts Department at Columbia College and an award-winning independent director/producer. He will take questions after the screening.

Indie Memphis

Internships

The Department of English, in conjunction with Rhodes Career Services office, sponsors a number of internships. Internships offer an excellent opportunity to observe and participate in a workplace environment. Such experiences allow students to explore various career options as they decide how they will apply themselves after graduation.

Communities in Conversation: Claire Colebrook, 200th anniversary celebration of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

Event date

Contact person: Jacqueline Baker

2018 marks the 200th anniversary of Frankenstein, but it also marks nearly two decades since the concept of the Anthropocene was proposed as a new strata—marking a threshold, where humans as a species have altered the earth at a geological level.  Frankenstein might seem to be the anti-Promethean manifesto for our time, warning us against playing God, asking us to be more mindful of the moral presence of nature.  There is, however, a hyper-Promethean way in which we might read Shelley’s Frankenstein.  Rather, than take on Victor Frankenstein’s moral anguish that he was guilty of over-reaching, perhaps we should look at the world from the point of view of the orphaned creature, whose only thought of life is not survival, procreation, and longevity: not living on, but living with nature.

A reception will precede the lecture at 5:30 p.m.