All Courses

ShareThis
Translate

Urban Studies 201. Introduction to Urban Studies. Spring. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: Social Science.
An interdisciplinary approach to examining issues and institutions in American cities; neighborhoods, downtowns, suburbs, housing, poverty, environmental justice, nonprofits, and city politics; discussion of urban public and social policies; field trips or service learning to do hands-on analysis of urban issues.

Urban Studies 360. Urban Studies Junior Internship. Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.
A directed internship with an urban, social, governmental, or nonprofit agency.
The courses integrate traditional academic work in Urban Studies with practical internship experience.
Prerequisites: Urban Studies major or minor with two courses in Urban Studies or Urban Studies electives.

Urban Studies 460. Urban Studies Senior Internship. Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.
A directed internship with an urban, social, governmental, or nonprofit agency.
The course integrates traditional academic work in Urban Studies with practical internship experience.
Prerequisite: Urban Studies 360.

Urban Studies 462. Field Projects in Community Organization. Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.
Direct application of class work to an urban problem or issue through fieldwork in an urban institution; development of a research or policy design before field activity; involvement of student, faculty sponsor, and community agency sponsor.
Prerequisites: Three courses in Urban Studies or Urban Studies electives.

Urban Studies 485. Senior Seminar in Urban Studies. Spring. Credits: 4.
An investigation of subject areas in the discipline of Urban Studies that involves research collaboration between students and faculty.

Interdisciplinary 222. Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Spring. Credits: 1.
Geographic information systems (GIS) technology is a tool used for scientific investigations, resource management, and development planning. GIS technology is a collection of digital maps, associated digital data, and software tools that can answer spatially posed questions. This course will introduce students to GIS technology, GIS software, and the application of GIS in a variety of natural and social science disciplines, including anthropology, biology, economics and business, geology, political science, international studies, and urban studies.

Interdisciplinary 322. Geographic Information Systems Research Seminar. Fall, Spring. Credits: 1-2.
This course is designed for students who have already been introduced to the analytical tools of GIS. Students will undertake a research project under the supervision of one of the faculty teaching this course. The research project will culminate in a paper and presentation. The seminar will meet on an ongoing basis to exchange ideas, report on progress, and share potential sources of information.

Anthropology Sociology 206. Urban Social Problems. Spring. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: Social Science.
The course provides an overview of the history of cities and urban development, urban strengths and challenges, and the future of cities. We will approach these issues using urban ecology and political-economy perspectives. Through hands-on experience in Memphis communities, students will come to understand how urban issues are social problems that affect people’s everyday lives. Prerequisite: Urban Studies 201.

Anthropology Sociology 209. Family in Social Context. Spring. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: Social Science.
This major institution is considered from sociological, anthropological, and historical perspectives. With emphasis on diversity and change, the course will examine issues of family organization, sexuality, marriage, and child rearing.
Prerequisites: Urban Studies 201.

Anthropology Sociology 261. Research Methods I. Fall. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: Social Science.
Basic concepts and methods of anthropological and sociological research. Both quantitative and qualitative (ethnographic) skills are stressed. Several small projects are undertaken utilizing these concepts and methods.
Prerequisite: Urban Studies 201.

Anthropology Sociology 303. Medical Sociology. Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.
Medical sociology is the study of the socio-cultural factors that affect health, illness, disease, and medical care. Topics include epidemiology, social demography of health, the relationship between social stress and health, health and illness behavior, the physician-patient relationship, and the organization of health care and medical practice. These topics will be studied by combining classroom lectures, discussion, and experiential learning. Students will participate in the ongoing implementation of a community health assessment of residents living in the Hollywood-Springdale area northeast of campus. The health study is part of the Community Outreach Partnership Center (COPC) grant project and is designed to identify barriers that limit access to health care among area residents.
Prerequisite: Urban Studies 201.

Anthropology Sociology 307. Sociology of Education. Fall. Credits: 4.
Education is considered to be the primary means to realizing the American ideals of equality and success. This course critically examines that idea using sociological perspectives and research to understand how class, race, and gender affect educational opportunities and outcomes. Students directly study educational issues by conducting observations and interviews in the local school system.
Prerequisite: Urban Studies 201.

Anthropology Sociology 343. Race/Ethnic Identities, Experiences, and Relations. Spring. Credits: 4. Degree Requirements: Social Science.
This course uses fundamental sociological concepts and theoretical perspectives to examine race/ethnicity within our everyday lives, the lives of “others”. It focuses primarily, the United States. The course emphasizes social stratification—including the intersection of race, social class, and gender—and social change.
Prerequisite: Urban Studies 201.

Political Science 200. Urban Politics. Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.
A critical introduction to urban America’s fiscal and racial problems, formal and informal political processes, power structures, and alternative futures.
Prerequisite: Urban Studies 201.

Political Science 230. Black Political Thought. Spring. Credits: 4.
A critical analysis of a variety of political goals, strategies, and tactics espoused in the 20th century. Views of Booker T. Washington, Marcus Garvey, W.E.B. DuBois, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Malcolm X are among those normally considered.
Prerequisite: Political Science 151 or permission of the instructor.

Political Science 282. Topics in Urban Politics. Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.
Prerequisite: Urban Studies 201.

Political Science 316. Urban Policy. Fall. Credits: 4.
Problems and processes of policy formation in the urban system; discussion of substantive policy areas such as housing and community development.
Prerequisite: Urban Studies 201.

Political Science 320. Urban Programs. Credits: 4.
Examination of programs and policies that address urban problems, with an opportunity to explore the inner workings and outcomes of effective programs that have social, environmental, and downtown emphases.
Prerequisite: Urban Studies 201.

History 242. African-American History. Fall. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: Humanities, F3.
The experiences of African-American people in the United States can be described as a continuous quest for empowerment; this quest has been affected by myriad factors (e.g., gender roles, class divisions, secular and nonsecular ideologies, regionalism) in addition to racism. This course, through the use of secondary and primary material, historical documentaries, and critical analyses, will chart the historically complex journeys of African Americans, from the impact of the African diaspora on colonial America to the Black student sit-ins and the formation of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee in 1960 and beyond.

History 249. Poverty in the United States. Spring. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: Humanities, F3.
This course will examine attitudes toward the poor throughout the course of U.S. history, as well as the experiences of public and private relief organizations. Lectures and readings give attention to attempts to define “poverty,” to vagabond/homeless experiences, to problems facing the working poor, to private and public attempts to eradicate poverty, and to the assessment of various programs of poor relief, public assistance, and family wage. Field trips and a community-based group project are required. (Course offered every third year; scheduled for 2008-2009.)

History 343. The Civil Rights Movement. Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: Humanities.
This course examines the social, political, and economic climate of the 1940s through the 1960s, and considers how both Blacks and Whites were affected. Specifically, the course will focus on various organizations and the strategies they implemented which resulted in events such as the Brown v. Board of Education case and the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Additionally, the course will analyze the subtle and not-so-subtle reactions to initiatives that allowed African Americans to attain many of the rights and privileges that have become commonplace in today’s society.

Business 361. Management of Organizations. Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.
Survey of organizational behavior and organization theory. Initially, the course covers fundamental issues such as theory construction, the difference between theoretical and non-theoretical models, and theory testing as a basis for analyzing management models. The second part of the course focuses on micro issues such as theories of work motivation, leadership, and selected topics such as tokenism and political behavior. The third part of the course deals with macro issues such as organizational structure, technology/work design, intra-organizational conflict, and the organizational/environmental interface. Throughout the second and third parts of the course, both theory application and theory evaluation are emphasized.
Prerequisites: Economics 101 or permission of instructor.

Biology 105. Topics in Biology with Laboratory: Environmental Science. Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: Natural Science, F7.
This course focuses on a scientific understanding of the environment as well as on people’s impact upon the natural world. Emphasis is on critical evaluation of environmental issues based on scientific principles. The fundamental ecological principles are the foundations for the students’ learning and understanding of, among others, human population dynamics, natural resources, energy sources and their use, and sustainable human systems. One of the goals of this course is for the students to acquire the tools and knowledge to help them to consider the environmental implications in their future professional and personal decisions. Field-based laboratories provide an opportunity for students to apply their theoretical knowledge. Through the laboratories, the students learn how to evaluate and quantify the ecosystem services provided by an urban park like Overton Park. They experience the "process of science" by formulating and answering testable (verifiable) questions; by making reliable predictions; by collecting and recording environmental data in tables, graphs, and charts; and by deriving conclusions from their observations. During the semester, students collect and analyze data to estimate selected ecosystem services such as climate regulation or carbon dioxide removal, and water purification.

Geology 214. Environmental Geology. Spring. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: Natural Science, F7, F11.
The application of geologic principles to understand the response of our environment to natural and anthropogenic forces of change. Emphasis is placed on sustainability and the hydrologic cycle. Local environmental topics will be analyzed spatially using GIS (geographic information systems). A service-learning component of the course focuses on both campus environmental audits and local environmental problems. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. (Course offered in alternate years; scheduled for 2007-2008.) Not open to seniors.

Education 201. Foundations of Education. Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: Social Science.
Foundations of Education provides an overview of the system of American education and the development and application of current educational practices. Specific course topics include history and philosophy, legal and political aspects, school finance, professional expectations, best practices, and specific challenges related to teaching and learning in today’s society.