Geoffrey Maddox | Assistant Professor
Office: 110 Clough | Phone: (901) 843-3710 | Email: Maddoxg@rhodes.edu

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Dr. Geoffrey Maddox is an Assistant Professor of Psychology and Director of the Memory and Cognition Lab.  His research examines (a) the relationship between episodic memory and other cognitive mechanisms such as attentional control, (b) differences in episodic memory between young and healthy older adults, and (c) how long term memory can be improved in both of these groups.

 Geoffrey Maddox CV


Education

Ph.D., Washington University in St. Louis
A.M., Washington University in St. Louis
B.A., University of Missouri - Columbia (Phi Beta Kappa)


Courses

Psychology 150 - Foundational Issues in Psychology
Psychology 200 - Research Methods and Statistics


Selected Publications

Wahlheim, C.N., Maddox, G.B., & Jacoby, L.L. (in press). The role of reminding in the effects of spaced repetitions on cued recall: Sufficient but not necessary. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory & Cognition. 

Bui, D.C., Maddox, G.B., & Balota, D.A. (2012). The roles of working memory and intervening task difficulty in determining the benefits of repetition. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 20, 341-347.

Maddox, G.B., Naveh-Benjamin, M., Old, S., & Kilb, A. (2012). The role of attention in the associative binding of emotionally arousing words.  Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 19, 1128-1134.

Maddox, G.B., & Balota, D.A. (2012). Self control of when and how much to test face-name pairs in a novel spaced retrieval paradigm: An examination of age-related differences.  Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition, 19, 620-643.

Naveh-Benjamin, M., Maddox, G.B, Jones, P, Old, S, & Kilb, A. (2012). The effects of emotional valence and gender on the associative memory deficit of older adults.  Memory & Cognition, 40, 551-566.

Maddox, G.B. , Balota, D.A., Coane, J.H., & Duchek, J.M. (2011). The role of age-related differences in forgetting rates in producing a benefit of expanded over equal spaced retrieval. Psychology and Aging, 26, 661-670.