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ANTHROPOLOGY & SOCIOLOGY

241. Urban Social Problems.
Spring. Credits: 4.
This course provides an overview of the history of cities and urban development, urban strengths and challenges and the future of cities. Students will examine urban processes in an effort to better understand how social contexts affect people’s lives and how inequality is reproduced and challenged. This course will pair the survey of a broad range of urban issues in the United States with hands-on experience in Memphis communities. Students will develop their skills to critically assess the causes, consequences and solutions to urban social problems.
Prerequisites:  None.

ECONOMICS

100. Introduction to Economics.
Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: F2 (some sections), F8.
A survey of economic analysis and institutions combining economic theory with a discussion of applications to the U. S. economic system for majors and non-majors. The course will include an introduction to both microeconomics and macroeconomics. Microeconomics: Study of the behavior of consumers and firms in competitive and noncompetitive markets, and the consequences of this behavior for resource allocation and income distribution. Consideration of government’s role in competitive and noncompetitive markets. Macroeconomics: Study of the determination of the domestic levels of income, output, employment and prices; study of international trade and finance. Consideration of economic growth and international trade.

201. Intermediate Microeconomics.
Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.
Development and practical application of tools of supply, demand, cost, capital, and profit analysis, including quantitative models, to decision-making in a business enterprise. Additionally, a study of the problems of economic measurement and forecasting methods, business planning, product strategy, and location analysis.
Prerequisites: Economics 100.

202. Intermediate Macroeconomics.
Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.
A study of the determinants of national income, its fluctuation and growth. Contemporary fiscal and monetary theories are analyzed in connection with the causes and control of economic growth and fluctuations.
Prerequisites: Economics 100.

290. Statistical Analysis for Economics and Business.
Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: F6.
Drawing conclusions from limited information is a common characteristic of decision making in economics and business. Although this course is designed to introduce the student to basic concepts of probability and statistics as applied to topics in Economics and Business, emphasis will be placed on the use of statistical inference to reduce the impact of limited information or uncertainty in decision-making. Topics will include descriptive statistical measures, probability, random variables, probability distributions, sampling distributions, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, time series analysis, regression and the use of index numbers.
Prerequisites: Economics 100.

305. Public Finance.
Fall. Credits: 4.
This course examines the role of the public sector in the economy. Students will learn about the theoretical motivations for and effects of government involvement in the economy as well as the empirical evidence regarding the consequences of such intervention. Students of economics should expect that rational economic agents will respond predictably to changes in incentives. This course will explore the incentive structure implied by government involvement in the economy and the predicted behavioral responses of individuals and firms. The structure of the major revenue raising (i.e., taxation) and expenditure operations of the government will be analyzed using microeconomic tools to determine their allocative and distributive effects.
Prerequisites: Economics 100 and 201.

310. International Trade and Policy.
Fall. Credits: 4.
The study of the determinants of comparative advantage and international trade. The course will include analysis of the winners and losers from trade and the resulting trade policies such as protectionism or export promotion. The course will also cover the movement of factors across borders, specifically immigration and international investment, and the policy restricting and promoting factor flows.
Prerequisites: Economics 100.

312. Economic Development.
Spring. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: F2.
Problems of economic development and growth; interaction of economic and non-economic factors, population and the labor force, capital requirements, market development, foreign investment and aid, and role of government. Comparison of the growth of advanced and developing economies. Policy measures to promote development and growth.
Prerequisites: Economics 100.

323. Classical and Marxian Political Economy.
Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: F2, F3.
The writings of Adam Smith and of Karl Marx had a profound and lasting influence on the way people think about the world. The Industrial Revolution that took place in the interim between the publications of the works of these two thinkers literally changed the world. This course focuses on the most important works of Smith and Marx and on the economic events taking place in eighteenth and nineteenth century England that continue to affect the way we think and live. The works of other Classical Economists are also examined. (Course offered in alternate years; scheduled for 2012-2013.)Prerequisites: Economics 100.

339. Economic History.
Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: F2, F3.
This course uses the tools of economic analysis to explore the long-run determinants of economic growth and the implications for policymaking today. Focus is on long-run economic change and the development of the American economy. Specific topics include the history and development of economic institutions, the American colonial experience, early American industrialization, slavery, the Progressive Era, the Great Depression, and the Southern economy. (Course offered in alternate years; scheduled for 2012-2013.)
Prerequisites: Economics 100.

420. Econometrics.
Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.
Economic theory is mainly concerned with relations among variables. Econometrics is concerned with testing the theoretical propositions embodied in these relations to show how the economy operates, and with making predictions about the future. Topics covered in this course include the general linear model, qualitative variables and time series analysis.
Prerequisites: Economics 100, 290 and Math 115 or 121.

ENGLISH

265. Special Topics.
Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: F2i, F4.
Recent topics have included the Modern Novella as well as other courses. Content may vary from year to year with the instructor. Course may be repeated as long as topics are different.
Prerequisites: English 151 or permission of instructor.
Note: the only Topics course that counts for the Political Economy major is Literature and Economics.

HISTORY

255. Conservatism in the United States.
Fall. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: F3.
Major Requirement: History of United States
This course will provide an introduction to developments in conservative thought and politics in the 20th century. Students will learn about the roots of American conservatism and learn how conservatives critiqued the creation of the New Deal, the rise of Stalinist Russia and the threat of communism, and the outbreak of World War II. The class will discuss conflicts between traditionalists and libertarians, Eisenhower’s “modern Republicanism,” conservatives and the Cold War, the campaign of Barry Goldwater, and the conservative response to the civil rights movement, Vietnam and “free love.” Finally, the class will consider the Reagan revolution and its impact on the current state of conservative politics in the United States and suggest directions for conservatism in the 21st century. (Course offered every third year, scheduled for 2011-2012.)

256. Liberalism in the United States.
Spring. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: F3.
Major Requirement: History of United States
How did liberalism, one of the dominant ideologies of the 20th-century America, get transformed into the “L” word in current political debates? Did Ronald Reagan bury liberalism or might Bill Clinton have played a part in its decline? This course will examine the origins of modern liberalism in the Progressive Era, its rise and expansion during the New Deal, its ideological dominance through the fifties and sixties, and its eventual decline at the end of the century. This course will give students the opportunity to understand the rise and fall of American liberalism, and to suggest possible directions for American liberals in the future. (Course offered every third year, scheduled for 2011-2012.)

351. United States Constitutional History to 1865.
Spring. Credits: 4.
Major Requirement: History of United States
This course examines American constitutionalism from the colonial era through the Civil War. Topics include American revolutionary ideology, the Constitutional Convention, the early nineteenth-century Supreme Court’s exercise of judicial review, and the new republic’s attempts to deal with such issues as federalism, the separation of powers, the government’s role in an expanding economy, and the fate of slavery in new territories. In contrast to a constitutional law course, this class is more concerned with how American constitutionalism both shaped and responded to larger political and social developments, and less concerned with the evolution of constitutional doctrine in and of itself. (Course offered in alternate years, scheduled for 2012-2013.)
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: History 300 or permission of instructor.

352. United States Constitutional History since 1865.
Spring. Credits: 4.
Major Requirement: History of United States
This course examines American constitutionalism from the Reconstruction period to the 1990s. In particular, the course focuses on the Supreme Court’s interpretation of the constitutional issues surrounding Reconstruction and civil rights, industrialization and economic expansion, the rise of national regulatory power, and the expansion of individual rights. In contrast to a constitutional law course, this class is more concerned with how American constitutionalism both shaped and responded to larger political and social developments, and less concerned with the evolution of constitutional doctrine in and of itself. (Course offered in alternate years, scheduled for 2013-2014.)
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: History 300 or permission of instructor.

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

264. The East Asia Miracle.
Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.
Survey of the development (economic and political) miracles that have taken place in East Asia since WWII. Special attention will be given to change in Japan since the war, the “Four Dragons” (S. Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Singapore), Southeast Asia, and China. Prerequisite: International
Prerequisite: International Studies 100.

282. Politics of European Integration.
Spring. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: F8.
An examination of the evolving European regional integration process, institutions and policy-making procedures, and the interaction between national and “European” interests and political outcomes. The development of Europe as a “community of values” and the fostering of a “European” identity are examined in the context of the European Union’s growth as a political community and its relations with non-member states.
Prerequisite: International Studies 100 or permission of instructor.

310. Comparative Political Economy.
Fall. Credits: 4.
Contemporary nation-states display a wide range of diversity in their patterns of power and authority and choices of economic systems. This course seeks to comprehend from a theoretical perspective the processes which produced these present systems, their similarities and differences, and their sources and mechanisms of change. Major theoretical perspectives will be reviewed.
Prerequisite: International Studies 200.

311. International Political Economy.
Spring. Credits: 4.
An overview of major issues and theoretical paradigms in international political economy, including interdependence, foreign economic policymaking, the evolution of the international financial system, the role of multinational corporations, and issues in the North-South dialogue. Emphasis is on the variety of ways in which political and economic forces interact to affect flows of goods, services, investments, money and technology.
Prerequisites: International Studies 100 or permission of instructor.

451. International Organization.
Fall. Credits: 4.
The growth of international organizations in the nation-state system; procedures of international cooperation in key issue areas, including the peaceful settlement of disputes and collective security, human rights, ecological balance, and economic well-being. The study of functional and universal organizations, with an emphasis on the United Nations.
Prerequisite: International Studies 100 or permission of instructor.

PHILOSOPHY

255. Philosophy of Race.
Spring. Credits: 4.
An examination of the advent and evolution of the concept of “race,” how it has been treated philosophically, and its application to ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, scientific methodology, and politics. (Course offered in alternate years; scheduled for 2012-2013.)

301. Ethics.
Fall. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: F1.
An examination of major ethical theories, typically virtue ethics, deontology, consequentialism, and care ethics with special emphasis on their central arguments and applicability to specific ethical issues.

303. Medical Ethics.
Spring. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: F1.
An examination of issues concerning the practice of medicine, the application of medical technology, and the business of health care delivery that have significant implications for an understanding of the good life and/or moral duties and obligations. (Course offered in alternate years; scheduled for 2011-2012.)

355. Feminist Philosophy.
Spring. Credits: 4.
An examination of major authors and themes informing the development of feminist theory. Aims include understanding and critiquing the social, political, moral and intellectual subordination of women to men as well as evaluating the unique contributions of feminist theory to metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and politics. (Course offered in alternate years; scheduled for 2011-2012.)

POLITICAL ECONOMY

486. Senior Seminar in Political Economy
Spring. Credits: 4.
Senior Seminar offers students the opportunity to integrate and extend their understanding of the various areas of theory, history, politics, philosophy and policy studied as a Political Economy Major.
Prerequisites: Senior standing.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

110. Political Questions.
Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: F2i, F8.         
What is just? What is right? Are human beings equal? In what ways should we be free? To what degree must we obey the state? What are our duties to others? Is “big government” compatible with individual liberty? This course explores these and other fundamental political questions concerning freedom and authority, rights and obligations, peace and war, moral obligation and selfishness, faith and reason. It will also delve into contentious public policy problems (e.g., income inequality, affirmative action, sexual discrimination), each of which poses moral and practical difficulties. Our goal will be to think openly, honestly, and precisely about the quandaries of political life. This course is open only to first years and sophomores.

205. Introduction to Public Policy.
Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.
An analysis of the processes and politics of making and implementing public policies. Topics may include: taxing and spending, energy, transportation, environmental protection, agriculture, equality, health, consumer protection, education, business, labor and welfare.
Prerequisite: Political Science 151.

212. American Political Thought and Statesmanship.
Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.
A survey of the ideas and controversies in American political thought and development from the Puritans to the present. Topics may include: the philosophical origins of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, selfishness and morality, federalism, the democratization of politics, equality and slavery, laissez-faire capitalism and the welfare state, the civil rights movement, and the redefinitions of freedom and equality by, for example, the new left and feminism.
Prerequisite: Political Science 151 or permission of the instructor.

214. Modern Ideologies.
Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.
What are all these “isms” that pervade political discourse? What does it mean to be a liberal (or a “progressive”), a libertarian, conservative, communitarian, socialist, or feminist? Where do liberal and radical feminists agree and disagree? Why is a democratic socialist not a Marxist? And vice versa. Is “environmentalism” a comprehensive political stance? Should there be a “green” party? What separates a nationalist from a “fascist”? Generally: what ideas, perspectives and principles account for these divergent doctrines that compete to organize the political world? Why do people adopt these views? Are there rational grounds for choosing among them? Is there a rational foundation for political life or, to put it another way, is political philosophy possible? Or are all claims to political knowledge ideological assertions? This course examines questions like these, although the list is not at all exhaustive.

218. Justice, Equality, and Liberty.
Fall or Spring. Credits: 4
Drawing primarily on contemporary sources in politics, philosophy and economics, this course examines rival visions of the good society. We will analyze competing conceptions of justice and the ways in which those views are modified by commitments to liberty and equality. Thematic questions will include: What do human beings owe to one another? How is personal responsibility related to social responsibility? What are the causes and consequences of wealth and poverty? What is the character of freedom? What does equality require? How should rights and duties be properly understood? A good portion of the course will be devoted to the intellectual and moral foundations of the free society and to critiques of the assumption that the good society is “the free society.”

The course will include public lecture, debates and conversations with visiting political theorists, economists, entrepreneurs and public officials.

230. Black Political Thought.
Spring. Credits: 4.
A critical analysis of a variety of political goals, strategies, and tactics espoused in the 20th century. Views of Booker T. Washington, Marcus Garvey, W.E.B. DuBois, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Malcolm X are among those normally considered.
Prerequisite: Political Science 151 or permission of the instructor.

270. Methods of Political Inquiry.
Fall, Spring. Credits: 4
Why do political scientists call themselves scientists? How can we learn about politics using the tools of scientific inquiry? What are the tools of scientific inquiry? This course introduces the methods political scientists (and others) use to generate and answer empirical questions about politics. We explore a wide variety of research methods, including experiments, observation, interviews, and surveys. In the course of this exploration, we examine how these methods are applied to real data by real researchers. We also critically analyze the methodological choices made and conclusions drawn by political scientists and others who employ social science data.
Prerequisite: Political Science 110 or 151.

280. Topics in American Politics and Institutions.
Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.
An examination of some aspect of American politics and institutions of government. Topics might include: the judiciary, state and local government, intergovernmental relations, American political development, the legislative process, campaign finance.
Prerequisite: Political Science 151 or permission of the instructor.

314. The Modern Search for Justice.
Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.
What can reason tell us about justice and the right way to live? Are human beings in fact equal? What are natural rights? Is democracy the best form of government? Can selfish individuals maintain a just government? Must we sacrifice liberty for security? These questions will be explored through a careful examination of the writings of Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Nietzsche.
Prerequisite: One 200 level course.

316. Urban Policy.
Fall. Credits: 4.
Problems and processes of policy formation in the urban system; discussion of substantive policy areas such as housing and community development.
Prerequisite: Political Science 151.

411. Seminar in Contemporary Political Philosophy: Problems of Rights, Freedom, and Equality.
Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.
An in-depth study of contemporary political thinking about such issues as: the culture of capitalism, the nature and limits of individual freedom, achieving equality in a diverse society, the challenges of biotechnology, rights in conflict, the evolution and endurance of American political principles. Topics vary from year to year.
Prerequisite: One 300 level course.

PSYCHOLOGY

309. Judgment and Decision Making.
Fall. Credits: 4.
An examination of how people make judgments about themselves and others, attribute causation to human behavior, and make judgments or decisions about courses of action.
Prerequisites: Psychology 211 or Math 111 or Economics 290 or permission of instructor.