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Announcing New Faculty 2011-2012 . . .

Publication Date: 8/8/2011

As Rhodes prepares for the arrival of new students, the college is happy to announce the following new faculty.

Ermanno Affuso joins the Department of Economics as Associated Colleges of the South Environmental Fellow. He expects to receive his Ph.D. in applied economics from Auburn University in January 2012 and has a master’s degree in civil environmental engineering from Bari University of Technology in Italy. His research interests include, but are not limited to, renewable resources, energy economics, bioeconomics, and spatial econometrics.

Geoffrey Bakewell joins the Department of Greek and Roman Studies as professor and director of the Search for Values in Light of Western History and Religion Program. He received his Ph.D. in classical philology from Brown University, and most recently was with Creighton University in the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Studies. Also at Creighton, he spent one summer as director of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, and four years as director of the Honors Program. He currently has a manuscript under review at the University of Michigan Press titled Aeschylus’ Suppliant Woman: the Tragedy of Immigration. In 2006 he received the Award for Excellence in College Teaching from the Classical Association of the Middle West and South.

Michael Bogucki, assistant professor of English, received his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His teaching and research interests include, but are not limited to, late 19th- and early 20th-century British, Irish and anglophone literature, modern drama and contemporary performing arts, and performance theory. Most recently he was a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of English at UNC, Chapel Hill.

Catherine Burris, assistant professor of religious studies, was most recently a visiting instructor at the University of North Florida. She received her Ph.D. in religious studies from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill in May 2011. Her research interests include, but are not limited to, the reception and transmission of textual and iconographic traditions in late ancient Christianity, issues of gender and the body, and magical practices in late antiquity.

Carlos Costa, assistant professor of international studies, expects to receive his Ph.D. in political science from Washington University in Saint Louis in 2011. He received his M.A. in political science from Louisiana State University, and his research interests include comparative politics, Latin American politics and comparative political economy. He most recently taught courses in Comparative Voting and Comparative Politics at Washington University.

Laura Field joins the Department of Political Science as a Jack Miller–Veritas Fund Post-Doctoral Fellow. She expects to receive her Ph.D. in government from the University of Texas, Austin in fall 2011. Her dissertation is titled “Writing in Blood: Compassion, Character, and Popular Rhetoric in Rousseau and Nietzsche.” Her research interests include, but are not limited to, rhetoric, ancient and modern political psychology, literature and politics, human agency, multiculturalism and constitutionalism.

Lindsay Flynn, assistant professor of political science, expects to receive her Ph.D. in government from the University of Virginia, Charlottesville in summer 2011. Her dissertation is titled “Laboring at Work and at Home: How States Encourage Moms To Do Both.” Courses she has taught include The Politics of the Policy Process, Politics of Western Europe, and Great Powers- Grand Strategy. Her research interests revolve broadly around public policy and the development of the American welfare state.

Sarah Hansen, assistant professor of philosophy, received her M.A. and Ph.D. in philosophy as well as a graduate certificate in gender studies from Vanderbilt University. Her research interests include continental philosophy and feminist theory. She has taught courses in critical theory, logic, and the meaning of life. She most recently taught at Vanderbilt.

Aaron Herold joins the Department of Political Science as a Jack Miller–Veritas Fund Post-Doctoral Fellow. He most recently served as the Jack Miller–Veritas Fund Visiting Assistant Professor at Boston College. With a Ph.D. in government from the University of Texas at Austin, he counts his research interests as religion and liberal democracy, early modern liberal political thought and its critics, the problem of statesmanship in modern political life, and theoretical problems in international relations.

Rachel Jabaily, assistant professor of biology, received her B.S. from the University of Wyoming and Ph.D. in Botany from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research interest explores the evolution of plant lineages through geologic time and geographic space. She recently completed a postdoctoral research position at Old Dominion University.

Jonathan Judaken joins the Department of History as professor and Spence L. Wilson Chair in the Humanities. He received his M.A and Ph.D. in history from University of California, Irvine and then spent two years as a postdoctoral fellow at Hebrew University, Jerusalem. His teaching and research interests focus on European cultural and intellectual history, specifically representations of Jews and Judaism and race and racism, as well as on existentialism. He most recently taught at the University of Memphis where he was also the director of the Marcus Orr Center for the Humanities. In 2006, he published Jean-Paul Sartre and the Jewish Question: Anti-Semitism and the Politics of the French Intellectual (Nebraska, “Texts and Contexts” series). His edited volume, Race After Sartre: Antiracism, Africana Existentialism, Postcolonialism (SUNY, “Philosophy and Race” series) came out in 2008 followed by Naming Race, Naming Racisms (Routledge, 2009). Most recently he co-edited Situating Existentialism with Robert Bernasconi, due out at Columbia University Press within the year.

Kimberly Kasper joins the Department of Anthropology and Sociology as a faculty fellow for environmental studies. In summer 2011, she is expected to receive her Ph.D. in Anthropology with a specialization in Environmental Archeology from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She received her first M.Sc. in Anthropology at Florida State University and a second in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoecology from Sheffield University, England.  

Elliott King, assistant professor of art, received his Ph.D. in art history and theory from the University of Essex. He has published two books on Dali’s art after 1940 and recently curated an exhibition, “Dali: The Late Work” at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta. He comes from a position at Colorado College where he taught classes in surrealism and art history.

Esen Kirdis, assistant professor of international studies, is expected to receive her Ph.D. in political science from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. Her dissertation topic is “Between Movement and Party: A Comparative Study of Islamic Political party Formation in Turkey, Morocco, and Jordan.” Her research interests include, but are not limited to, comparative politics, comparative political parties, Islamic politics, and judicial politics in authoritarian states.

Rebecca Klatzkin, assistant professor of psychology, comes to Rhodes from the University of Richmond where she was a visiting assistant professor. She received her Ph.D. in psychology (behavioral neuroscience) from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and has taught classes in Biological Psychology, Drugs & Behavior, Psychopathology, Methods & Analysis, and others. Her previous research focused on stress- and pain-related mechanisms in women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder. She is currently studying cardiovascular and neuroendocrine responses to stress in women with binge eating disorder.

Seok-Won Lee, assistant professor of history specializing in East Asian history, received his master’s degree and Ph.D. in history from Cornell University. His dissertation was titled “Rationalizing Empire: Nation, Space and Community in Japanese Social Sciences, 1931-1945.” He was most recently at Fort Lewis College in Durango, CO, where he taught classes in East Asian Civilization, Modern China, Japan since 1800, and Japanese History Through Film.

Ariel Lopez joins the Department of Greek and Roman Studies as an assistant professor. He received his Ph.D. in philosophy in history from Princeton University. His research interests include late antique Egypt, economic history of the later Roman Empire, and monasticism and society in late antiquity. He has previously taught courses in the Rhodes History Department, and European Studies and Search programs.

Mary Molinary, assistant professor of English, received her M.F.A. in creative writing from The University of Memphis. As an adjunct professor at Memphis College of Art, she has taught courses in Creative Writing, Poetry, Text and Image: Art as a Document/ary, and Ethnopoetics. Recently she was awarded the 2010 Tupelo Press/Crazyhorse Award for a First or Second Book of Poetry for her manuscript, Mary & the Giant Mechanism. She has previously taught for the Rhodes Summer Scholars Writing Program.

Vanessa Mongey, assistant professor of history, most recently taught courses in Latino history and on Revolutions in the Caribbean at Eugene Lang College, The New School for Social Research. She received her Ph.D. in history from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. Her research and teaching interests include, but are not limited to, the Atlantic World; Early American History; Comparative perspective on the Americas; and issues of migration and diaspora.

John Murray joins the Department of Economics as the Joseph R. Hyde III Professor of Political Economy. He received his Ph.D. in cconomics from The Ohio State University in 1992 and was most recently with the University of Toledo where he taught undergraduate courses in micro and macroeconomics, American economy in the 20th century and world economic history, along with courses for graduate students in comparative economic systems, population economics and many more. In 2007, he published Origins of American Health Insurance: A History of Industrial Sickness Funds, and in 2009 co-edited Children Bound to Labor: The Pauper Apprentice System in Early America. His next book, A World of Children: The Charleston Orphan House, 1790-1860, is under contract with the University of Chicago Press.

Clara Pascual-Argente, assistant professor of modern languages and literatures, most recently taught in the Hispanic Studies Department at the University of Kentucky. She received her Ph.D. in Spanish literature and cultural studies from Georgetown University. Her teaching and research interests include medieval and early modern European literature and visual culture, memory studies, and all levels of Spanish language.

Larryn Peterson, assistant professor of chemistry, received her B.A. from Carroll College in Helena, Montana, and Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Southern California. Her research interests lie in the area of bioorganic chemistry. She comes from Stanford University where she was a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Chemistry.

Stephen V. Rice, visiting assistant of mathematics and computer science, has worked in the computer field for more than 30 years, including 19 years as a professional software developer and 9 years teaching computer science at the college level. He received his Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and his M.S. in computer science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Elizabeth Thomas joins the Department of Psychology as associate professor, director of the Urban Studies Program and holder of the Plough Chair of Urban Studies. She received her Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and has most recently served as associate director for Graduate Education in the Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences Program at the University of Washington Bothell, where she taught courses including Cultural Psychology, Approaches to Social Research, Community Psychology, and Psychology and the Visual Arts. She recently co-authored a text titled Community Psychology: Linking Individuals and Communities, and co-edited a special issue of the American Journal of Community Psychology titled “Children as Protagonists: Participatory Action Research With Children.” In 2006, she received a Worthington Academic Distinction Project Grant for a multiyear project titled:” Initiative for Community Based Learning and Scholarship.”

Daniel Ullucci, assistant professor of religious studies, received his Ph.D. and M.A. in religious studies from Brown University. His research focuses on the development of the New Testament and the interaction among early Christian groups and traditional Mediterranean religions. Most recently he taught courses in early Christianity and the New Testament at Wesleyan University in Connecticut.

Jenny Vaydich joins the Department of Psychology as assistant professor. She received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology and M.A. in Counseling Psychology from the University of Notre Dame and has taught courses in developmental and clinical psychology. The central theme of her research is child and adolescent emotional development. Most recently she taught at James Madison University.

Chia-rong Wu, assistant professor of modern languages and literatures, comes from Widener University in Pennsylvania. He received his Ph.D. in comparative literature from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and specializes in modern Chinese literature and cinema, Asian American literature, and psychoanalytic theory. His current research focus is on the representation of ghosts in relation to multiple dimensions of history, ethnoscapes, and gender politics.

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