Courses

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Descriptions of course offerings are included below. For advice on course selection be sure to speak with a faculty adviser.

Course Offerings

101-102. Elementary Spanish.

101 Fall, 102 Fall, Spring. Credits: 4-4.

Pronunciation, fundamentals of grammar, composition, and reading of texts of graded difficulty.

201-202. Intermediate Spanish.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4-4.

Degree Requirement: F10 for 201.

Review and continuation of grammar; composition; training for oral proficiency. Reading of modern literary works of Spain and Spanish America.

Prerequisite: One year of Spanish in college or two years in high school.

205. Spanish in Spain.

Summer. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirement: F10, F11.

An intensive study of Spanish at Estudio Sampere, Universidad de Deusto, or other host institutions.

Prerequisite: One year of college-level Spanish.

209. Spanish in Latin America.

Summer. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirement: F10, F11.

An intensive study of Spanish at Estudio Sampere’s Cuenca, Ecuador location or other host institutions. This course satisfies the proficiency requirement in foreign languages, as well as the foundation requirement for experiential learning beyond the Rhodes campus.

Prerequisite: One year of college-level Spanish.

301-302. Advanced Spanish Language and Civilization.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4-4.

Degree Requirement: F2 for 302.

A study of the most difficult aspects of the Spanish language with emphasis on the four skills of speaking, understanding, writing, and reading. Special attention is given to the idiomatic character of the language. Text materials deal with civilization and current events. Aural comprehension and oral production are stressed in 301; composition is stressed in 302, a writing intensive course. These courses need not be taken in sequence. While students may take both courses, either one will satisfy a minor/major requirement. Students who have previously taken Spanish 305 or Spanish 309 have in most cases already gained the competencies stressed in 301 and should enroll in 302 if they need a course at this level.

Prerequisite: Spanish 202 or the equivalent.

303. Survey of Peninsular Spanish Literature.

Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F4.

Reading and analysis of selected works of Peninsular Spanish literature from a range of genres. Beginning with a brief introduction to Spain’s multicultural past, the course will provide students with a panoramic survey of the major periods in Spanish cultural and literary history from the 11th through the 21st centuries. Emphasis given to the fundamentals of literary research and analysis. Ideally, this course should be taken early in the minor/major, shortly after completing 301 or 302.

Prerequisite: Any of the following: 301, 302, 305, 309, or permission of the instructor.

305. Spanish in Spain.

Summer. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirement: F11.

A study of the most difficult aspects of the Spanish language with emphasis on the four skills of speaking, understanding, writing, and reading. Special attention is given to the idiomatic character of the language. The course is offered in conjunction with Estudio Sampere or Universidad de Deusto.

Prerequisite: Two years of college-level Spanish.

306. Survey of Spanish American Literatures and Cultures.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F4.

A panoramic overview of literary and cultural movements from the pre-Columbian era to the present. Emphasis given to the fundamentals of literary research and analysis. Ideally, this course should be taken early in the minor/major, shortly after completing 301 or 302.

Prerequisite: Any of the following: 301, 302, 305, 309, or permission of the instructor.

307. Oral Proficiency Practicum.

Spring. Credits: 1.

Discussion of contemporary issues in Spanish-speaking communities with emphasis on improving oral proficiency.

Prerequisite: Any of the following: 301, 302, 305, 309, or permission of the instructor.

309. Spanish in Latin America.

Summer. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirement: F11.

A study of the most difficult aspects of the Spanish language with emphasis on the four skills of speaking, understanding, writing, and reading. Special attention is given to the idiomatic character of the language. Text materials deal with civilization and current events. The course is offered in conjunction with Estudio Sampere (Cuenca, Ecuador) or IES (Buenos Aires, Argentina).

Prerequisite: Two years of college-level Spanish.

310. U.S. Latino Literatures and Cultures.

Fall. Credits: 4.

A course in which students read and analyze texts pertaining to the U.S. Hispanic experience as they work with agencies that work alongside Hispanic communities of Memphis.

Prerequisite: Any of the following: 301, 302, 305, 309, or permission of the instructor.

315. Literary Theory and Latin American Literature.

Spring. Credits: 4.

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the various schools of thought that set the grounds for modern literary and cultural criticism. Each school questions inherited views of the world postulated by its predecessors, and refashions the textual practices in literary and cultural studies. Through a reading and discussion of Latin American texts, this course examines how developments in theory alter our field of study and how the literary realm itself shapes the views of critics. Some of the theories to be studied are Formalism, Structuralism, Deconstruction, Reader-Response, Feminisms, Gender Theories, and Postcolonial Theory.

Prerequisite: Any of the following: 301, 302, 305, 309, or permission of the instructor.

320. Spanish American Drama.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

A study of the works of Spanish American dramatists from the colonial era to the present.

Prerequisite: Any of the following: 301, 302, 305, 309, or permission of the instructor.

330. Spanish American Poetry.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

A study of the major movements and representatives of Spanish American Poetry, from pre-Columbian era to the present.

Prerequisite: Any of the following: 301, 302, 305, 309, or permission of the instructor.

340. Colonial and Global Visions in Spanish American Literatures.

Fall. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F9.

The course focuses on the visual, literary, and cartographic production of the pre-Hispanic world and Spanish American Colonial culture and the re-imagination of the period in the last century. Some topics include: Inca and Mesoamerican maps, codices, and graffiti; contrasting narratives of conquest; the earliest elaboration of global worlds; the debate on the nature of Amerindians and early notions of Human Rights; imperial discourses; gender and race; and satire and humor. Authors include Pre-Hispanic poets and mapmakers, Cristobal Colón, Hernán Cortés, Fernando de Ixtlilxóchitl, Bartolomé de las Casas, Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Carlos Sigüenza y Góngora, and Juan de Valle Caviedes among others. Movies and contemporary texts on the Colonial past will serve to the study of the modern reception of this cultural production.

Prerequisite: Any of the following: 301, 302, 305, 309, or permission of the instructor.

350. Fiction by Spanish Women Writers.

Fall. Credits: 4.

This course aims to raise and examine issues associated with women’s literary expression through the study of works by some of the most prominent Spanish writers of the last two centuries. Questions of marginality (as related to gender, language and culture), female sexuality and creativity, and the challenge of writing under the watchful eye of state censors will be addressed.

Prerequisite: Any of the following: 301, 302, 305, 309, or permission of the instructor.

355. Medieval and Early Modern Women Writers.

Fall or Spring. Credits 4.

The primary focus is on women writers from the Middle Ages to the end of the seventeenth century. It explores how women writers in the Hispanic world, such as Florencia Pinar, Teresa de Jesús, Catalina de Erauso, Juana Inés de la Cruz, and María de Zayas, negotiate gender construction and its impositions through literature. For these women, literary production becomes the site of gender-related political resistance, and in some instances, gender redefinition or what could be called a Hispanic proto-feminism. The course deals with a variety of literary genres, such as poetry, short novel, theater, autobiography, and letters, as well as some oral tradition.

Prerequisite: Any of the following: 301, 302, 305, 309, or permission of the instructor.

360. Genders In Spanish American Literature.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

A study of gender in works by women and men writers. Topical units composed of texts representing various genres, regions, and periods.

Prerequisite: Any of the following: 301, 302, 305, 309, or permission of the instructor.

365. Special Topics in Spanish.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Emphasis on a particular genre or the literature of a specific Hispanic nation.

Prerequisite: Any of the following: 301, 302, 305, 309, or permission of the instructor.

370. Contemporary Southern Cone Literature.

Fall. Credits: 4.

A study of contemporary Southern Cone literature including short stories, novels, theatre, poetry, and essays.

Prerequisite: Any of the following: 301, 302, 305, 309, or permission of the instructor.

375. Contemporary Central American Literatures.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4

A study of major Central American fiction, poetry, drama, and essays. Particular attention to works published after 1950, although some selections from before 1950 may be included to develop understandings of cultural, literary, and socio-historical contexts.

Prerequisite: Any of the following: 301, 302, 305, 309, or permission of the instructor.

395. Spanish Medieval Masterpieces.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

A survey course of the literary manifestations of Spain during the Middle Ages. Some of the main texts that may be studied are Poema de Mio Cid, Milagros de Nuestra Señora, Libro de buen amor and La Celestina.

Prerequisite: Any of the following: 301, 302, 305, 309, or permission of the instructor.

405. The Literature of Mexico after 1911.

Fall. Credits: 4.

A study of major Mexican writers of the 20th and 21st centuries. May include works by Juan Rulfo, Rosario Castellanos, Elena Garro, Carlos Fuentes, Octavio Paz, and Carlos Monsiváis.

Prerequisite: Any of the following: 301, 302, 305, 309, or permission of the instructor.

406. The Contemporary Novel of Spanish America.

Fall. Credits: 4.

A study of major novelists since 1950. May include works by Alejo Carpentier, Roberto Bolaño, Mario Vargas Llosa, Cristina Peri Rossi, and Gabriel García Márquez.

Prerequisite: Any of the following: 301, 302, 305, 309, or permission of the instructor.

408. The Spanish American Short Story.

Fall. Credits: 4.

A study of Spanish American short story writers. May include works by Jorge Luis Borges, Augusto Monterroso, Luisa Valenzuela, Julio Cortázar, and Horacio Quiroga.

Prerequisite: Any of the following: 301, 302, 305, 309, or permission of the instructor.

410. Modern Spain: From Enlightenment to Realism.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

This course aims to give the student an overview of the literary development of Spain during the 18th and 19th centuries. Emphasis is given to the main cultural and literary movements: Enlightenment, Romanticism and Realism.

Prerequisite: Any of the following: 301, 302, 305, 309, or permission of the instructor.

412-413. Twentieth-Century Spain.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4-4.

Spanish 412 studies the generations of 1898 and 1927. Spanish 413 focuses on the literature of the Spanish Civil War, the Franco Regime, and the transition from dictatorship to democracy. These courses do not need to be taken in sequence.

Prerequisite: Any of the following: 301, 302, 305, 309, or permission of the instructor.

414. Cinema of Spain.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirement: F5

This course offers an in-depth look at some of the main films, genres, directors, and styles of Spanish cinema in the specific context of Spanish culture and history, as well as of wider European and world film history. In addition, it introduces students to key terms and concepts of cinematic analysis and film theory. In a given semester, the course may focus on a specific filmmaker, genre, or period.

Prerequisite: Any of the following: 301, 302, 305, 309, or permission of the instructor.

421. Poetry and Prose of the Golden Ages.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

This course focuses on 16th- and 17th-century poetry and prose. May include works by Quevedo, Góngora, Garcilaso de la Vega, Cervantes, Zayas, Teresa de Jesús, and Juan de la Cruz.

Prerequisite: Any of the following: 301, 302, 305, 309, or permission of the instructor.

423. Hispanic Golden Age Theater.

Fall or Spring. Credits 4.

This course will study major playwrights of the Golden Age such as Lope de Vega, Pedro Calderón de la Barca, Tirso de Molina, María de Zayas, Juana Inés de la Cruz and Juan Ruiz de Alarcón, amongmany others. Written and staged between the end of the 16th and the end of the 17th centuries—a period known for its literary and artistic activity both in the New World and Spain—these plays are important because of their themes, audience and treatment of critical issues such as gender definition, national identity, and conflicts of class.

Prerequisite: Any of the following: 301, 302, 305, 309, or permission of the instructor.

424. Exploring Don Quijote.

Fall or Spring. Credits 4.

This course aims to familiarize students with Miguel de Cervantes’s masterpiece, considered one of the classics of 17th-century Spanish literature. Questions of readership, authorship, and narrative, among others, will be examined.

Prerequisite: Any of the following: 301, 302, 305, 309, or permission of the instructor.

426. Imperial Discourses of the Hispanic World

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4

Degree Requirements: F9

The sixteenth and seventeenth centuries witnessed the rise of one of the earliest global powers in the Western Modern world: the Spanish Empire. This course examines the notion of Spanish Empire as it is expressed in the literary production of the times, and how this affects its consideration in the following centuries and up until today. Challenging the metageographies that inform the study of the field, we will adopt a transatlantic framework to promote comparisons, and explore interactions, between texts that are conventionally labeled as separate creations of Latin American vs. Peninsular literature. Using our framework, we seek to fashion a more complex panorama and achieve a deeper understanding of the discourses behind this early global phenomenon. Readings include Mesoamerican Poetry and the descriptions of the earliest Conquistadors; histories of the Incas and Moriscos in the Peninsula; contemporary short stories and their filmic representations among others. Through the study of these works we will inquire into concepts like nation, race, identity, empire and their role on the elaboration of the Hispanic imaginary.

Prerequisite: Any of the following: 301, 302, 305, 309, or permission of the instructor.

486. Senior Seminar.

Spring. Credits: 4.

An overview of major topics of Hispanic literatures and cultures. Emphasis is given to the process of conceiving and developing a substantial library of research, and to the elaboration of a major research paper and a formal academic presentation based upon the essay.

495-496. Honors Tutorial.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4-8,4-8.