Courses

ShareThis
Translate

Descriptions of course offerings are included below. For advice on course selection be sure to speak with a faculty adviser.

Course Offerings

101-102. Elementary Russian.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4-4.

Elementary grammar, reading, and conversation, supplemented by materials on Russian culture.

201-202. Intermediate Russian.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4-4.

Degree Requirement: F10 for 201.

Intermediate grammar and continued training in conversation and composition, supplemented by assignments in the Language Center. Reading of Russian texts of graded difficulty.

Prerequisites: Russian 101-102 or equivalent.

205. The Russian Mind.

Fall. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F4.

Study and analysis of the major intellectual currents of modern Russian history through literature, religious philosophy, and film. The study of these works is intended to identify some important attributes of the Russian national identity. Literary works will include those by Blok, Akhmatova, Soloukhin, Rasputin, and Petrushevskaya. Works of religious philosophy are by Soloviev, Florensky, Berdiaev, and Bulgakov. Films will include Dersu Uzala, The Barber of Siberia, and The Russian Ark.

209. Russian in Russia.

Summer. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F10 for 209, F11.

A 3-4 week guided encounter with the language and culture aimed at solidifying vocabulary and grammar previously acquired. A significant cultural component is part of the course. Takes place in May-June.

212. Masterpieces of Russian Literature in Translation.

Fall. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F4.

Reading of representative works by major Russian writers of the nineteenth century (including Pushkin, Pavlova, Gogol, Goncharov, Soboleva, Turgenev, Tolstoy, and Dostoevsky). The literary works include Eugene Onegin, supernatural tales by Gogol, Oblomov, The Cossacks, Notes from Underground, and Fathers and Children. These works will be studied for their individual merit, what they illuminate about nineteenth-century Russian society, and their contribution to the rise of the Russian novel. All works are read in translation.

215. Giants of Russia’s Silver Age: Soloviev, Blok, and Rachmaninoff.

Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5, F9.

Study of the aesthetic, thematic, and personal connections among three of Russia’s towering figures: Vladimir Soloviev, Alexander Blok, and Sergei Rachmaninoff. The course will examine in depth the creative works of the philosopher-poet Soloviev, the poet-dramatist Blok, and the composer-pianist Rachmaninoff (for whom poetry was second only to music). Master themes and global concepts linking the three creative artists include the yearning for harmony; exploration of Russian Orthodox religiosity; elevation of the –eternal feminineî of Sophia (the body of God); and connection between beauty and goodness. Representative philosophical, poetic, and musical works, respectively, of the three artists will be examined. Offered in alternate years. Scheduled for Spring, 2013.

Prerequisite: At least one course from the following departments or programs: Music, Philosophy, Religious Studies, or Russian Studies.

255. Catherine the Great and the Enlightenment: The Italian-Russian Connection.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5, F9.

In this course students investigate the Italian-Russian connections in three major areas of cultural production during the reign of Catherine the Great: music, literature, and architecture. Creative thinkers whose works will be studied include Bortnyansky, Paisiello, Casanova, Beccaria, Rastrelli, and Quarenghi. Students will learn features of the European and Russian Enlightenments, study the intricacies of Russian court culture, and explore the institution of patronage. The course aims to develop an understanding of cross-cultural fertilization and some major differences between Mediterranean and Slavic cultures. It is complemented by an optional, though highly recommended, three-week study trip to Italy and Russia (See Russian 256). Offered in alternate years. Scheduled for Fall, 2012.

256. Catherine the Great and the Italian-Russian Connection.

Summer. Credits: 0-1.

Degree Requirements: F11.

This Maymester program examines the musical, literary, and architectural connections between Italy and Russia during the reign of Catherine the Great. It takes participants to three cities: Rome, Milan, and St. Petersburg. In Rome students will attend lectures at LUMSA (university adjacent to the Vatican), attend a musical performance at the Teatro dell’Opera, visit places associated with Giacomo Casanova, and investigate architectural monuments by Italian architects whom Catherine attracted to Russia. In Milan participants will attend an opera at the Teatro all Scala and visit sites associated with Cesare Beccaria. In St. Petersburg students will attend performances in the Great Hall of the St. Petersburg Philharmonic and the Mariinsky Theatre, and will study major architectural ensembles. Takes place in May and June.

300. Dostoevsky.

Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F4.

This course explores selected works by Dostoevsky in the context of the rise of the Russian novel. The course will examine in depth several short works by the writer, as well as the novels The Idiot and The Brothers Karamazov. Concentration is on the major literary, philosophical, and religious issues Dostoevsky raises in his prose, as well as how these issues better enable us to understand the Russian mind. All works are read in translation.

301-302. Advanced Russian.

Fall ,Spring. Credits: 4-4.

Advanced grammar, with greater emphasis on the refinement of conversation and composition skills. Discussion of topics related to contemporary life in Russia.

Prerequisites: Russian 201-202 or equivalent.

309. Russian in Russia.

Summer. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F10 for 209, F11.

A 3-4 week guided encounter with the language and culture aimed at solidifying vocabulary and grammar previously acquired. A significant cultural component is part of the course. Takes place in May-June.

400. Russian Film: Film Theory.

Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

Introduction to the ideological and aesthetic forces that have shaped the development of Soviet/Russian film, with particular attention to various film theories. Films of major directors, such as Eisenstein, Pudovkin, Tarkovsky, Kulidzhanov, and Sokurov will be studied. All films are subtitled; course is taught in English. (Cross-listed with English 382.) Offered in alternate years.

410. Analytical Reading.

Fall. Credits: 4.

This course aims to teach students the strategies of understanding texts of high literary quality by analyzing elements of given texts in their complexity. While focusing mainly on psycho-poetic aspects of reading activity, the course also introduces formal approaches to text analysis, such as identifying the stylistic devices and expressive means employed by the authors.

486. Senior Seminar.

Spring. Credits: 4.

Students will be assigned individual research topics associated with the essential concept of the Russian Idea, give weekly progress reports, which will involve analytical discussion, and present their results orally and in writing at the end of the course. Special attention will be given to assigned readings from the Russian press and from Russian literature.

495-496. Honors Tutorial.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4-8, 4-8.