Courses

ShareThis
Translate

CHINESE

220. Contemporary Chinese Cinema.
Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: Humanities, F5.
An introductory course on contemporary Chinese cinema that combines film viewing with readings of film theory and criticism. The aim is to provide a window for students to glimpse the complexity of contemporary Chinese culture. Students will view selected Chinese films produced in mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong from the 1980’s to the present and be required to read essays of critical studies which explore the interrelations of various issues in Chinese society.
Prerequisites: None.

FRENCH

234. Hitchcock and Truffaut.
Spring. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: Humanities, F5. A study of films that exemplify the influence of French language and culture on Hitchcock and of Hitchcock on Truffaut. Taught in English. Does not satisfy the proficiency requirement in Foreign Languages.

334. French Cinema.
Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: Humanities, F5.
A study of prominent directors and movements of French cinema, this course emphasizes techniques and themes of French filmmaking from the silent era
through surrealism and the New Wave to the present. Taught in English. Counts toward the Film Studies minor.
Prerequisites: Students wishing this course to count toward the French minor or major should have completed French 301 and 321 or 322 and French 323 or 324 prior to taking 334. Credit toward the French major or minor will not be granted
retroactively.

GERMAN

240/340. German Cinema.
Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: Humanities, F5.
This course, examining important German films since the days of the Weimar Republic, places special emphasis on the historical and social background of each film as well as the aesthetic qualities of the works. It thereby seeks to contribute to a better understanding of recent German history and of films as an artistic medium. Filmmakers to be studied include Friedrich Murnau, Fritz Lang, Leni Riefenstahl, Volker Schlöndorff, Helma Sanders-Brahms, Wim Wenders, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, and Wolfgang Becker. All films are subtitled; the course is taught in English. Ger 340 will be reserved for majors and minors, who will do substantial portions of the work for the course in German.

RUSSIAN

400. Soviet/Russian Film.
Spring. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: Humanities.
Introduction to the ideological and aesthetic forces that have shaped the development of Soviet/Russian film, with particular attention to various film theories. Films of various directors, such as Eisenstein, Chukhrai, Daneliia, Tarkovsky, and Mikhalkov will be studied. All films are subtitled; course is taught in English and cross-listed with English 382.

Russian 214 - Dostoevsky in Literature and Film

HISTORY

History 205: History of Latin America through Film

ENGLISH

204. Introduction to Screenwriting.
Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.
An introduction to the basic three-act film structure. Students will read and view various screenplays and films, and develop their own film treatment into a full-length script.
Prerequisites: Must have taken a creative writing or film studies class.

235. World Drama.
Fall. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: Humanities, F4.
An introduction to the critical reading of dramatic texts, and to the various implications of the genre itself. The stage will be explored not only as the site for the enactment of literary themes but also as a cultural arena where the representation of cultural values and discourses becomes contested, subverted, reaffirmed, or celebrated. The issues will also be addressed in examining the translation of theater to film.
Prerequisites: English 151 or permission of instructor.

202. Introduction to Cinema.
Fall. Credits: 4
Degree Requirements: Humanities.
This course introduces students to the critical tools involved in the analysis of moving-image media such as film, video, and television. Students will compose essays that demonstrate a historically informed grasp of cinema’s formal techniques and how these produce meaning for spectators.
Prerequisites: Eng. 151 Or equivalent. All students must attend a weekly screening.

241. History and Criticism of American Cinema.
Fall. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: Humanities.
This course introduces students to the history of American cinema as art and industry. Although Hollywood film provides the focus, the course may also examine independent cinema. Students will compose essays that demonstrate their grasp of film history and analysis.
Prerequisites: English 151 or equivalent.

242. World Film.
Spring. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: Humanities.
A chronological survey of world film, focusing on the theoretical implications of developing technologies and changing social mores, and introducing the major critical approaches to a filmic text.
Prerequisites: English 151 or permission of instructor.

245. Special Topics in Film.
Fall. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: Humanities.
An introductory film course open to all students. Special topics may include alternative cinema (non-fiction and experimental cinema); issues of race, gender, and class; genre studies (comedy, film noir, melodrama); and histories of various technologies and media (the advent of sound film, television, video). Course may be repeated for credit with a different topic.
Prerequisites: English 151 or permission of instructor.

381. Advanced Topics in Film.
Spring. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: Humanities.
The focused exploration of a topic or genre that ties a body of films together in order to pursue issues of film criticism and theory in depth. Such topics as the following may be considered: gender and film, race and film, film adaptation, American genre films, the film auteur, screenplay writing. Includes the study of critical texts. Repeatable for credit with different topic.
Prerequisites: Any 200-level film class or permission of instructor.

382. Film Theory.
Spring. Credits: 4.
Degree Requirements: Humanities.
The study of appropriate films in connection with a selection of theoretical texts that elaborate the problem of meaning in film. Films and readings will be roughly chronological. Requirements include mandatory attendance at film screenings, to occur outside of scheduled class hours.
Prerequisites: Any 200-level film class or permission of instructor.