Africana Studies Program

Structural Stigma and Health Inequalities: Mark Hatzenbuehler

Mark L. Hatzenbuehler, PhD, is Associate Professor of Sociomedical Sciences and Sociology at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health.  He has published over 110 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters on the role of stigma in shaping health inequalities.  His work has been published in leading journals, including American Psychologist, Psychological Bulletin, American Journal of Public Health, and JAMA Pediatrics, and has been cited in amicus curiae briefs for case on status-based discrimination.

Free Speech, Diversity, Inclusion: Is There a Balance?

A Conversation With:

Keegan Callanan, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Middlebury College; Noelle Chaddock, Associate Dean of Academic Affairs for Diversity and Inclusivity, Rhodes College; James R. Stoner, Jr., Hermann Moyse, Jr., Professor and Director of the Eric Voegelin Institute in the Department of Political Science, Louisiana State University

Moderated by: Daniel Cullen, Professor of Political Science, Rhodes College

Holograms and Microwaves: The Science of Black Music

The Africana Studies Program at Rhodes College is proud to welcome acclaimed scholar Shana L. Redmond. An interdisciplinary scholar of music, race, and politics, Redmond centers the sounds of the African diaspora within the global struggle for Black liberation. She offers groundbreaking and thought-provoking insights into how the practice of music-making has reflected and redirected the formation of racial identities and the resistance to colonialism and white supremacy.

Archives of Agency: Food in the Struggle for Black Liberation

 

In Black Liberation movements in the United States, food plays not only a biological
role but also a political one. In this talk, Dr. Ashanté Reese explores the ways in which
Black Liberation movements use food as a platform for mobilizing communities and
making connections between historical and contemporary movements, and also considers
how organizing around food demonstrates multifaceted resistance.

 

Baldwin Now Symposium: Keynote Lecture

This two-day symposium celebrates the life and legacy of James Baldwin. Baldwin’s work has become a touchstone in our present cultural moment. Baldwin is an intellectual forbearer of Ta-Nehisi Coates, Jesmyn Ward, and the #BlackLivesMatter movement, and a key reference for post-civil rights discussions of race in America. As such, Baldwin continues to be a cultural catalyst for American society.

Keynote lecture by Dwight McBride, author of Impossible Witness, Why I Hate Abercrombie and Fitch, and editor of James Baldwin Now.

Tanisha C. Ford

Professor Tanisha Ford, author of Liberated Threads: Black Women, Style and the Global Politics of Soul, will be giving a public lecture and signing copies of her new book on Tuesday, March 22 at 6pm in Blount Auditorium.

 

Co-sponsor : Office of External Programs

An Evening of Parisian Jazz

Rhodes will present an Evening of Parisian Jazz including a lecture by Making Jazz French author Jeffrey H. Jackson and music performed by local band Le Tumulte Noir. Free and open to the public, the event begins at 6 p.m. in Hardie Auditorium of Palmer Hall on campus. French themed hors d'oeuvres will be served.

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