Courses

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Descriptions of ENVS course offerings are included below. For other courses that count towards the majors and minors, refer to our partner Departments. For advice on course selection be sure to speak with a faculty adviser.

 

Course Offerings

 

111. Physical Geology.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4

Degree Requirements: F7

Introduction to the composition and structure of the earth and processes that create modern landscapes. Topics include plate tectonics, the formation of minerals and rocks, weathering, erosion, and crustal deformation. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week, plus optional weekend field trips.

 

116. Introductory Topics in Earth Science.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4

This course offers students an introduction to various topics in the field of earth sciences. Varies with instructor.

 

120. Introduction to Earth and Atmospheric Science.

Fall. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F7.

This course provides an introduction to the Earth’s physical landscape including climate, landforms, and vegetation, and the processes that link them. The first section of the course examines atmospheric processes and the distribution and characteristics of the Earth’s climatic regions. The second section of the course focuses on processes at or near the Earth’s surface and gives special attention to volcanic and tectonic landforms; weathering and erosion; fluvial, aeolian and glacial processes; and the landforms they produce. The main objective of the course is for students to gain a basic understanding of the interaction between climate and the physical and biological systems at the earth’s surface.

 

150. Environment and Society.

Fall. Credits: 4.

This course is an introduction to contemporary environmental issues. Topics may include over-population pressures, climate change, energy consumption, water availability, biological diversity decline, sustainability practices, agricultural land-use, and global environmental governance, among other major global environmental challenges. Faculty from the natural sciences and humanities/social sciences in the Environmental Studies and Sciences program sometimes team-teach this course. Using an interdisciplinary approach, students will learn the science behind these issues, as well as the economic, political and cultural factors that influence environmental change and shape our responses to it. This course is required for both the Environmental Studies and Environmental Sciences majors and minors.

 

160. Rocky Mountain Ecology.

Maymester. Credits: 2.

Degree Requirements: F11.

This field course, taught by faculty at the Teton Science Schools in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, is focused on community ecology of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE). Ecology topics include: regional geology, influence of topography and climate on vegetation; community interaction of plants and animals including herbivory; predation and competition, community dynamics, succession, disturbance, identification of plants, insects and birds. The course will also familiarize students with basic field data collection and research techniques. The course will connect students with the other programming areas of Teton Science Schools as well as other professionals in the environmental science field in the context of professional opportunities after college. This course fulfills the Environmental Experience required for Environmental Studies and Sciences majors and minors. Requires separate application process and payment of additional tuition.

 

170. Rocky Mountain Field Research

Maymester. Credits: 4

Degree Requirements: F7 and F11

This field course, taught by faculty at the Teton Science Schools in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, is focused on community ecology of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE). This course also contains a substantial research component in which students will participate in a long-standing TSS program in order to develop skills in research design and data collection. Then students will create and complete their own research projects. The course will connect students with the other programming areas of Teton Science Schools as well as other professionals in the environmental science field in the context of professional opportunities after college. This course fulfills the Environmental Experience required for Environmental Studies and Sciences majors and minors. Requires separate application process and payment of additional tuition.

 

205. Selected Topics in Environmental Studies.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Introduction to selected topics in Environmental Studies. Topics vary with instructor. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Not offered every year.

 

206, 206L. Selected Topics in Environmental Sciences.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4 or 4, 1.

Introduction to selected topics in Environmental Sciences. Topics vary with instructor. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Course offering may or may not have a laboratory credit associated with the class. Not offered every year. Course may include the equivalent of 3 hours of laboratory each week.

Prerequisites: BIOL 120 or ENVS 120 and CHEM 120 or permission of instructor.

 

220. Physical Geography of the Southeastern United States.

Spring, Credits: 4

This course examines the physical landscapes in the southeastern United States. This is the non-glaciated, humid-subtropical region of eastern North America that includes the southern Appalachian Mountains, Coastal Plain, Interior Low Plateaus, and the Ozark and Ouachita Mountains. The primary focus is on the geological setting, geomorphic features, climate, soils, and vegetation. Students will examine the interrelationships of these factors in addition to human activities that shape the landscape.

Prerequisites: BIOL 120 or ENVS 120 and CHEM 120 or permission of instructor.

 

450. Field Experience in Environmental Studies and Sciences

Fall or Spring. Credits: 1-4.

Students may take part in independent field work under a faculty member’s supervision. Must be approved by the director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences program. With approval, this course will fulfill the Environmental Experience required for Environmental Studies and Sciences majors and minors.

 

460. Internship.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F11.

The Environmental Studies and Sciences internship enables students to make connections between what they have learned in the classroom and the world around them by applying their knowledge to real-world settings. Interns can work with a variety of local environmental agencies or organizations. Students must be approved by the Office of Career Services and have the permission of the Director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences program. This course fulfills the Environmental Experience required for Environmental Studies and Sciences minors.

 

490. Independent Research in Environmental Studies and Sciences

Fall or Spring. Credits: 1-4.

Students may take part in independent research under a faculty member’s supervision. Must be approved by the director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences program.

 

486. Senior Seminar

Spring. Credits: 4.

This senior capstone experience allows Environmental Studies and Environmental Sciences majors to make interdisciplinary connections between topics and themes which they have studied throughout their coursework. Assignments may include substantial reading, research projects, and oral presentations.