Daniel Ullucci

Associate Professor of Religious Studies, W.J. Millard Professor of Religious Studies

Dr. Ullucci received his Ph.D. and M.A. in Religious Studies from Brown University. His work focuses on the development of the New Testament and the interaction among early Christian groups and traditional Mediterranean religions. His past work has examined the ritual of animal sacrifice and the process by which some early Christian groups came to reject this practice. He is currently focused on types of religious experts in the ancient Mediterranean, the competitive practices of religious experts, and the ways in which this competition shaped early Christianity. His work draws on cognitive theory of religion, practice theory, papyrology, and ancient Mediterranean philosophical traditions, as well as more traditional New Testament studies. Other interests include the history of warfare and the development of artificial intelligence. He comes to Rhodes from the New England area where he taught at: Wheaton College, Holy Cross, Bowdoin College, Colby College, Wesleyan University, and the University of Massachusetts.

MEEMAN CENTER FOR LIFELONG LEARNING COURSES

Cognitive Theories of Religion

The Historical Jesus

Other Christianities

Paul the Philosopher

Roman Religion in the Time of Jesus
Social Networks: An Alternative View of Christian Origins

PUBLICATIONS

Books

2015      A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross S. Kraemer. Co-edited with N. DesRosiers, S. Lander, and J. Pastis. Brown Judaic Studies.

2013      “The One Who Sows Bountifully”: Essays in Honor of Stanley K. Stowers. Co-edited with C. Johnson Hodge, S. Olyan, and E. Wasserman. Brown Judaic Studies.

2012      The Christian Rejection of Animal Sacrifice. Oxford University Press.

Journal Articles

2015      “Sacrifice in the Ancient Mediterranean: Recent and Current Research” Currents in Biblical Research 13.3: 388-439.

2013      “A Loan of Wheat.” Bulletin of the American Society of Papyrologists 50.

2013      “Complicating Myth: A Review of Bruce Lincoln’s Gods and Demons, Priests and Scholars: Critical Explorations in the History of Religions.” Method and Theory in the Study of Religion 25: 197-208.

2010     “Prophets vs. Texts About Prophets.” Bibliana 1: 18-23.

2008    “Before Animal Sacrifice: A Myth of Innocence.” Religion & Theology 15: 357-374.

Chapters in Edited Volumes

f.c.       “Religious Experts and Popular Religion.” In Religious Competition in the Ancient Mediterranean, eds. N. DesRosiers and L. Vuong. Society of Biblical Literature Press. (Forthcoming, 2016)

f.c.       “Sacrifices and Votives.” In The Oxford Handbook of Early Christian Ritual, eds. R. Uro, J. Day, R. DeMaris, and R. Roitto. (Forthcoming, 2016)

2015      “Un-gendering Andrea.” In A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross S. Kraemer, eds. N. DesRosiers, S. Lander, J. Pastis, and D. Ullucci.

2014     “What Did He Say? The Ideas of Religious Experts and the 99%.” In Religious Competition in the Third Century C.E.: Jews, Christians, and the Greco-Roman World, eds. N. DesRosiers, J. Rosenblum, and L. Vuong. Vandenhoeck and Ruprecht.

2014     “Qualifying Rabbinic Ritual Agents: Cognitive Science and the Early Rabbinic Kitchen.” Co-authored with J. Rosenblum. In Religious Competition in the Third Century C.E.: Jews, Christians, and the Greco-Roman World, eds. N. DesRosiers, J. Rosenblum, and L. Vuong. Vandenhoeck and Ruprecht.

2013      “Towards a Typology of Religious Experts in the Ancient Mediterranean.” In “The One Who Sows Bountifully”: Essays in Honor of Stanley K. Stowers, eds. C. Johnson Hodge, S. Olyan, D. Ullucci and E. Wasserman. Brown Judaic Studies.

2011      “Contesting the Meaning of Animal Sacrifice.” In Ancient Mediterranean Sacrifice: Images, Acts, Meanings, eds. J. Knust and Z. Varhelyi. Oxford University Press.

Online Publications

2014     “Sacrifice in the New Testament, A Guide.” Oxford Biblical Studies Online. www.oxfordbiblicalstudies.com (Subscription required).

Education

Ph.D., Brown University
M.A., Brown University
B.A., Boston University