Courses

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Descriptions of course offerings are included below. For advice on course selection be sure to speak with a faculty adviser.

Art Course Offerings

Introductory Studio Art.

Introductory Studio Art Students interested in commencing studio work are encouraged to enroll in the introductory studio courses in their first year. These courses are designed both for students with no previous background and with a limited background in the designated areas. Special emphasis is given to introducing media, exploring basic techniques, and problem solving. Studio courses require 138 hours of work per term for four credits. A studio fee may be required for studio courses to cover the expense of materials and equipment.

101. Drawing.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

An introduction to drawing in various media.

103. Life Study.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

An introduction to figure drawing in various media. A major component to the course is drawing from nude models.

105. Painting.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

An introduction to the fundamentals of acrylic painting, including its formal and conceptual properties.

107. Sculpture.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

Emphasis will be on the development of ideas as they relate to traditional and non-traditional approaches to making art. Students will develop skills in modeling, casting, wood working, and alternative media. This course situates students within the contemporary art world and challenges them to articulate thoughts and concepts through the art making process.

113. Digital Arts: Still Images.

Fall. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

An introduction to digital arts, focused on the exploration and production of still images, including but not limited to digital photography, through electronic media.

114. Digital Art: Moving Images

Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

Minor Elective: Film Studies

Students will make digital projects, including, but not limited to: narrative, documentary, and experimental filmmaking, and/or animation projects. Cameras and editing software are provided

166. Topics in Studio Art.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Topics will vary from year to year with the instructor. Course may be repeated as long as topics are different.

Intermediate Studio Art.

Students taking intermediate studio courses will explore issues concerning media and methods relevant to individually designated concepts and investigations. Students are expected to spend twelve hours per week on research and production. Students must have permission from the instructor before registration. Studio courses require 138 hours of work per term for four credits. A studio fee may be required for studio courses to cover the expense of materials and equipment.

201. Intermediate Drawing.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Prerequisites: Art 101, 103 or 105.

203. Intermediate Life Study.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

Figure drawing from life.

Prerequisites: Art 101, 103, or 105.

205. Intermediate Painting.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Prerequisites: Art 105.

207. Intermediate Sculpture.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Prerequisites: Art 107.

213. Digital Art: Intermediate Projects.

Fall. Credits: 4.

Minor Elective: Film Studies

Advanced studio work in digital arts, focused on creating electronic media-based projects geared toward individual student interests. Students can work with either still or moving images.

Prerequisites: Art 113 or 114.

266. Intermediate Topics in Studio Art.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

A studio, open to both majors and non-majors, on varying subjects. May be repeated for credit. Topics courses include landscape painting and figure painting.

Advanced Studio Art.

Students taking advanced studio courses will further explore issues concerning media and methods relevant to individually designated concepts and investigations. Students are expected to spend twelve hours per week on research and production. Directed Inquiries can be accommodated through any of the advanced studio offerings. Studio courses require 138 hours of work per term for four credits. A studio fee is required for every studio course to cover the expense of materials and equipment. A 300-level class may be repeated at the 400-level course designation, however, this is reserved for rare instances in which a student is already performing at a graduate school level. Permission of instructor is required.

366. Advanced Topics in Studio Art.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

A studio, open to both majors and non-majors, on varying subjects. May be repeated for credit as long as topics are different. Topics courses include landscape painting and figure painting.

301. Advanced Drawing.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Prerequisites: Art 201, 203, or 205.

305. Advanced Painting.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Prerequisites: Art 205.

307. Advanced Sculpture.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Prerequisites: Art 207.

313. Digital Art: Advanced Projects.

Fall. Credits: 4.

Minor Elective: Film Studies

Advanced studio work in digital arts, focused on creating electronic media-based projects geared toward individual student interests. Students can work with either still or moving images.

Prerequisites: Art 213.

460. Art/Architectural Internship.

Degree Requirements: F11.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 1-4.

Students are placed with local artists and/or regional galleries, design firms or architectural firms.

Prerequisites: Art major with junior or senior standing; successful completion of all one-hundred level courses and at least one 200-level course in the department of Art and Art History as required for the appropriate track; and approval of the department of Art and Art History. May be repeated for a total of six credits. Students may apply a maximum of four credits towards the Art major or minor.

485. Senior Seminar.

Fall. Credits: 4.

Individually designed creative projects or research undertaken with the approval and guidance of the art faculty. Students are required to propose a fifteen-week program of research, develop a relevant body of work and artist statement, meet weekly for critiques with the instructor, and maintain a digital portfolio of their work. In addition each student will participate in two formal critiques with art faculty and a peer group at midterm and final.

Prerequisites: Senior standing and successful completion of all 100- and at least two 200 -level courses required for the major.

486. Senior Thesis.

Spring. Credits: 4.

The continuation of the senior seminar in which students further develop and refine creative projects with the approval and guidance of the art faculty. This course culminates in a Thesis Gallery Exhibition.

Prerequisites: Art 485.

Art History

Introductory Courses

120. Classical Archaeology.

Fall. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5, F3.

Major Requirement: Ancient Studies (Prehistoric through Roman.)

This course will address the material remains of the ancient Mediterranean, including Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Aegean, Greece, Etruria, and Rome. By examining the history of the rediscovery of the classical world we will come to understand “How do we know what we know about antiquity?” through the personalities and methodologies of more than two centuries of archaeological practice. We will also study ethical and legal questions related to classical archaeology and the broader question of “Who owns the past?” by looking into case studies of looting, theft, and museological issues.

151. History of Western Art.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5, F3.

A survey of Western art from prehistory to the twentieth century. In the first half of the semester emphasis is placed on examining art within the producing cultures of ancient Egypt, the Near East, classical Greece and Rome, the Byzantine world, and medieval Europe. The second half of the semester emphasizes the development and expansion of Renaissance ideals of art, and the reassessment of these ideals in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. Students will be exposed to the basic methods of art historical analysis as well as the major artists, movements and objects in the history of Western art. (Course offered every semester.)

152. Survey of Contemporary Art.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5, F3.

A comprehensive introduction to European and American art and art criticism since 1940. Movements and sensibilities to be studied include Abstract Expressionism, Pop, Minimal, Feminist, and Neoexpressionism. Themes examined will include modernism and postmodernism, mass culture, art and politics, gender, race, and other markers of identity. Artists include Pollock, Warhol, Spero, Chicago, and Ringgold.

Intermediate Courses

Before enrolling in these courses students are expected to have completed Art 151, earned AP credit, or obtained permission of instructor.

209. Art and Architecture of the Ancient Near East.

Spring. Credits: 4.

Major Requirement: Ancient studies (Prehistoric through Roman.)

A chronological study of the visual and material culture of the Ancient Near East. Students will be introduced to current scholarship on the art and architecture of the Ancient Near East and emphasis will be placed on understanding these forms in their social and political contexts. (Course offered every third year; scheduled for 2014-2015.)

210. Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt.

Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

Major Requirement: Ancient studies (Prehistoric through Roman.)
This course explores the art and architecture of ancient Egypt. The chronological survey will examine the material remains of these cultures with a significant emphasis on the social, political, and religious contexts in which they were created. The rediscovery and study of these cultures in the 19th and 20th centuries and museological issues related to this material will also be discussed. Students will approach ancient Egypt through the eyes of art historians, archaeologists, and anthropologists. (Course offered in alternate years; scheduled for 2014-2015.)

218. Greek Art and Architecture.

Fall. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

Major Requirement: Ancient studies (Prehistoric through Roman.)

This course evaluates the visual culture and archaeological remains of the Greek lands from the “Dark Age” to the end of the Hellenistic period. In this course, we not only examine the visual characteristics of the architecture, painting, and sculpture of ancient Greece, but also interpret those characteristics within their historical and cultural context. We study the major religious, funerary, and social rituals of the ancient Greeks and how the archaeological remains inform us of those activities. (Course offered in alternate years; scheduled for Fall 2013.)

219. Roman Art and Architecture.

Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

Major Requirement: Ancient studies (Prehistoric through Roman.)

This course is a chronological introduction to the art, architecture, and archaeology of the ancient Roman world from the Republic to the time of Constantine. We will investigate what the Romans themselves considered “art” the be and how to historically contextualize the variety of Roman visual culture, including not only sculpture and architecture, but also fresco painting, coins, gemstones, and urban infrastructure and design. Other topics to be considered include the propagandistic and ideological use of visual culture by Roman emperors, issues of gender and class in private patronage, domestic architecture, funerary art, and the art of the Roman provinces. (Course offered in alternate years; scheduled for Spring 2014.)

221. Art and Spirituality in the Middle Ages.

Fall. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

Major Requirements: Medieval through Baroque.

An examination of the visual arts in Europe during the period normally known as the Middle Ages, ca. 313-1348. Attention will also focus on the art emanating from the Byzantine east. Art works discussed will include both secular and religious objects, and topics covered will include issues of aesthetics, iconography, style, functionality, and spirituality. (Course offered in alternate years; scheduled for 2014-2015.)

223. Italian Renaissance Art.

Fall. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

Major Requirements: Medieval through Baroque.

This course examines Italian art from about 1300-1580, with emphasis on the historical and social context. Such themes as patronage, functions, theory, materials and techniques, style, and the profession of the artist will be discussed. Artists treated include Giotto, Brunelleschi, Masaccio, Donatello, Botticelli, Leonardo, Bramante, Raphael, Michelangelo, Titian, and Palladio. (Course offered in alternate years; scheduled for 2015-2016.)

226. Northern Renaissance Art.

Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

Major Requirements: Medieval through Baroque.

An examination of painting, sculpture, and the graphic arts in the Netherlands, Germany, and France, from about 1400 to 1600, with emphasis on the historical and social context. Such themes as the status of the artist, art and mysticism, iconography, and the relationship of Northern European and Italian art and culture will be discussed. Artists include Jan van Eyck, Rogier van der Weyden, Hieronymus Bosch, Albrecht Dürer, and Pieter Bruegel. (Course offered in alternate years; scheduled for 2014-2015.)

228. Baroque Painting from Caravaggio to Rembrandt.

Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

Major Requirements: Medieval through Baroque.

The course investigates European art ca. 1580-1750. Students will be introduced to the major artists, subjects, and stylistic developments during this time period. Additional emphasis will be placed on issues such as patronage, collecting, technique, women artists, and recent discoveries. Artists covered include Caravaggio, Bernini, Gentileschi, Rembrandt, Vermeer, Velasquez, and Rubens. (Course offered in alternate years; scheduled for 2015-2016.)

234. American Art.

Fall. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

Major Requirements: Modern.

A thematic examination of art produced in the United States from the colonial period to WWII with special emphasis on the place of art and artists within a democracy. Themes include the relationship between political and visual representation, landscape as metaphor, race and ethnicity in art, and the tension between private and public patronage. Artists include Thomas Jefferson, Stuart Davis, and Frank Lloyd Wright. (Course offered in alternate years; next scheduled for Fall, 2015.)

241. Modern Art I.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

Major Requirements: Modern.

A survey of the major European art movements from about 1760 to 1880. Special emphasis is given to the interplay between politics and the emergence of new styles and subject matter in painting. Artists covered include David, Goya, Constable, Delacroix, Friedrich, Courbet, Manet, and Monet. (Course offered in alternate years; next scheduled for Fall 2014.)

242. Modern Art II.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

Major Requirements: Modern.

A survey of European art from 1880 to 1960. Themes examined include primitivism, the tension between modern art and mass culture, the attempt to combine radical politics with formal innovation, and the development of non-objective styles of painting. Movements discussed include symbolism, fauvism, cubism, futurism, dada, surrealism, and abstract expressionism. (Course offered in alternate years; next scheduled for Spring 2015.)

245. Guernica and Antiwar Art

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5, F3.

Major Requirements: Modern.

This course investigates how modern artists have opposed war over the past two centuries. It begins with a focus on Pablo Picasso’s monumental painting, Guernica, considers the historical precedents from which he drew inspiration, acknowledges the prevalence of war reporting and propaganda in shaping public opinion of combat, and then traces the legacy of his example. Much of the art under consideration was produced in the United States, so the course will provide one perspective on the so-called American Century. In addition to developing the skills of close looking, students will read both primary and secondary sources, as well as critical theory. All of this will help us to consider the efficacy of such art, especially that produced in a democracy. (Course offered in alternate years; next scheduled for Fall 2015.)

253. Art and Life in Pompeii.

Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

Major Requirement: Ancient studies (Prehistoric through Roman.)

This course will focus on Pompeii and Herculaneum, also addressing material from sites like Stabiae, Boscoreale, Boscotrecase, and Oplontis. To complete a picture of Roman urbanism in Italy, we will also touch upon Ostia—Rome’s port city at the mouth of the Tiber River—as well as the Urbs itself (Rome.) (Course offered in alternate years; next scheduled for Spring 2015.)

260. Gallery Management.

Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F11.

This course is a one semester class designed to teach students the basics of running a gallery as well as examining theoretical issues including but not limited to: the mission of a gallery, understanding a gallery’s audience, and the role of exhibition spaces in a community. Working with the gallery director students may be involved in: crating, shipping, publicizing, printing, preparing and designing of exhibits, proper handling of works of art, hanging, lighting, labels, receptions, security, etc. for all exhibits during the spring semester year. The class is only open to juniors and seniors or with permission of the instructor.

265. Topics in Art History.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Topics will vary from year to year with the instructor. Course may be repeated as long as topics are different.

ADVANCED COURSES

356. Michelangelo.

Spring. Credits: 4.

Major Requirements: Medieval through Baroque.

An examination of the life and art of Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564). Special attention will be paid to stylistic, interpretive, and methodological issues, as well as the many controversies that have surrounded his life and art from the Renaissance to the present. Works studied will include painting, sculpture, architecture, drawings, and poetry. Class will combine both lecture and seminar formats. Either Art History 151 or Art History 223 is strongly recommended but not required. (Course offered every third year; scheduled for 2014-2015.)

365. Advanced Topics in Art History.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4. A seminar, open to both majors and non-majors, on varying subjects. May be repeated for credit so long as topics are different.

399. Tutorial for Honors Candidates.

Spring. Credits: 1.

Students interested in reading for honors in the department of Art and Art History are required to enroll in a preparatory tutorial in the spring semester of their junior year. Successful completion of the tutorial does not necessarily guarantee acceptance into the Honors Program.

461. Museum/ Gallery Internship.

Degree Requirements: F11.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 1-4.An internship with a gallery or museum with a focus on the visual arts. Prerequisites: Approval of department Chair and offer of placement from an approved gallery or museum. Normally open only to Art majors and minors with junior or senior standing. Students may apply a maximum of four credits towards the Art major or minor.

485. Senior Seminar.

Fall. Credits: 4.

Art History Track. Advanced seminar involving theory, methodology, and historiography. Students will submit a major research paper and conduct an oral presentation. Topics vary with instructor. Required of all majors in the art history track. Prerequisites: Art History 151, 152, and at least three 200-level Art History courses.

495-496. Honors Tutorial.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4, 4.