Greek and Roman Studies

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Professors

Geoffrey W. Bakewell. 2011. B.A., Yale University; Ph.D., Brown University. (Tragedy, Athenian democracy, Greek and Latin languages and literatures.)

Associate Professors

Kenneth S. Morrell. 1993. B.A., Stanford University; M.A. and Ph.D., Harvard University. (Greek and Latin languages and literatures, information technology.)
David H. Sick. 1997. Chair. B.A., College of Wooster; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Minnesota. (Greek and Roman religion, Indo-European mythology, Roman social history, Greek and Latin languages.)

Assistant Professors

Joseph N. Jansen. 2007. B.A., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin. (Ancient history, economy, and historiography, Greek and Latin languages and literatures.)
Susan Satterfield. 2008. B.A., University of Alabama; Ph.D., Princeton University. (Roman history, religion, and historiography, Greek and Latin languages and literatures.)

Requirements for a Major in Greek and Roman Studies

Concentration in Classical Languages (Greek and/or Latin):

A total of thirteen courses (52 credits) as follows:

  1. Six courses (24 credits) of ancient Greek and/or Latin. Four of these courses must be above the 201 level, and the student must take at least two courses in each language.
  2. Greek and Roman Studies 275, 474, 475, and 476.
  3. Three courses (12 credits) on the culture and civilization of ancient Greece and Rome. The courses below count toward this requirement:
    • Art 120, 209, 210, 218, 219, 253, 365 (when appropriate)
    • European Studies: Art 836, Greek and Roman Studies 833, 834, History 830, Philosophy 835
    • Greek and Roman Studies: 150, 245, 250, 255, 260, 270, 283, 305, 315, 361
    • History 211, 311, 312, 313
    • Humanities (Search) 101, 102, 201 (Classical Track)
    • Philosophy 201
    • Political Science 311
    • Religious Studies 214, 280, 281, 282, 283, 285, 286
    • Theatre 280

Concentration in Classical Studies:

A total of thirteen courses (52 credits) as follows:

  1. Three courses (12 credits) of ancient Greek and/or Latin beyond 201. These may be in one language solely or a combination of the two.
  2. Greek and Roman Studies 275, 474, 475, and 476.
  3. Six courses (24 credits) on the culture and civilization of ancient Greece and Rome. The courses below count toward this requirement:
    • Art 120, 209, 210, 218, 219, 253, 365 (when appropriate)
    • European Studies: Art 836, Greek and Roman Studies 833, 834, History 830, Philosophy 835
    • Greek and Roman Studies: 150, 245, 250, 255, 260, 270, 283, 305, 315, 361
    • History 211, 311, 312, 313
    • Humanities (Search) 101, 102, 201 (Classical Track)
    • Philosophy 201
    • Political Science 311
    • Religious Studies 214, 280, 281, 282, 283, 285, 286
    • Theatre 280

Concentration in Material Culture:

A total of thirteen courses (52 credits) as follows:

  1. 1. One course (4 credits) of ancient Greek or Latin beyond 201.
  2. 2. Greek and Roman Studies 275, 474, 475, and 476.
  3. 3. Archaeology 220 or Anthropology 254: Archaeological Methods.
  4. 4. Three courses (12 credits) from the following courses:
    • Art: 120, 209, 210, 218, 219, 253, 365 (when appropriate)
  5. 5. Four courses (16 credits) from the following courses:
    • Anthropology 290/Archaeology 210
    • Chemistry 107
    • European Studies: Art 836, Greek and Roman Studies 833, 834, History 830
    • Greek and Roman Studies 150, 245, 250, 255, 260, 270, 283, 305, 315, 361
    • Humanities (Search) 101, 102, 201 (Classical Track)
    • History 211, 311, 312, 313
    • Religious Studies 260

Requirements for a Minor in Greek and Roman Studies

Concentration in Classical Languages (Greek and/or Latin)

A total of seven courses (28 credits) as follows:

  1. Four courses (16 credits) of ancient Greek and/or Latin. Three of these courses must be above the 201 level, and the student must take at least one course in each language.
  2. Greek and Roman Studies 275.
  3. Two courses (8 credits) on the culture and civilization of ancient Greece and Rome. The courses below count toward this requirement:
    • Art 120, 209, 210, 218, 219, 253, 365 (when appropriate)
    • European Studies: Art 836, Greek and Roman Studies 833, 834, History 830, Philosophy 835
    • Greek and Roman Studies: 150, 245, 250, 255, 260, 270, 283, 305, 315, 361
    • History 211, 311, 312, 313
    • Humanities (Search) 101, 102, 201 (Classical Track)
    • Philosophy 201
    • Political Science 311
    • Religious Studies 214, 280, 281, 282, 283, 285, 286
    • Theatre 280

Concentration in Classical Studies

A total of seven courses (28 credits) as follows:

  1. Two courses (8 credits) of ancient Greek and/or Latin beyond 201. These may be in one language solely or a combination of the two.
  2. Greek and Roman Studies 275.
  3. Four courses (16 credits) of courses on the culture and civilization of ancient Greece and Rome. The courses below count toward this requirement:
    • Art 120, 209, 210, 218, 219, 253, 365 (when appropriate)
    • European Studies: Art 836, Greek and Roman Studies 833, 834, History 830, Philosophy 835
    • Greek and Roman Studies: 150, 245, 250, 255, 260, 270, 283, 305, 315, 361
    • History 211, 311, 312, 313
    • Humanities (Search) 101, 102, 201 (Classical Track)
    • Philosophy 201
    • Political Science 311
    • Religious Studies 214, 280, 281, 282, 283, 285, 286
    • Theatre 280

Concentration in Material Culture

A total of seven courses (28 credits) as follows:

  1. 1. One course (4 credits) of ancient Greek or Latin beyond 201.
  2. 2. Greek and Roman Studies 275
  3. 3. Archaeology 220 or Anthropology 254: Archaeological Methods.
  4. 4. Two courses (8 credits) from the following courses:
    • Art 120, 209, 210, 218, 219, 253, 365 (when appropriate)
  5. 5. Two courses (8 credits) from the following courses:
    • Anthropology 290
    • Chemistry 107
    • European Studies: Art 836, Greek and Roman Studies 833, 834, History 830
    • Greek and Roman Studies 150, 245, 250, 255, 260, 270, 283, 305, 315, 361
    • Humanities (Search) 101, 102, 201 (Classical Track)
    • History 211, 311, 312, 313
    • Religious Studies 260

Honors in Greek and Roman Studies

Detailed information about graduating with honors in Greek and Roman Studies is available from the department. Only students with a minimum overall GPA of 3.5 and a GPA within GRS of 3.7 by the end of the fall semester of their junior year will be eligible to pursue honors. In addition to fulfilling the requirements for the major with a concentration in either Greek, Latin, Classical Studies, or material culture, students seeking honors will be expected to complete the following additional work:

  1. GRS 495-496: Honors Tutorial. (GRS 496 will count as GRS 475-6 for students attempting to graduate with honors.)
  2. An honors thesis or project that demonstrates an exceptional understanding of one or more aspects of the ancient world. Such a project might take the form, for example, of a written thesis, an analysis of archaeological fieldwork, or the production of a tragedy or comedy.

Programs Abroad

To help students experience the artifacts of the Greeks and Romans and other Mediterranean cultures in the areas where they lived, GRS offers a number of opportunities for travel-study abroad. As described below in the descriptions for GRS 305 and Latin 232, the department regularly offers courses that involve travel and study in Greece, Italy, and other countries in the Mediterranean and Middle East. Faculty members also contribute to collaborative initiatives that provide opportunities for research, for example, in archaeological excavations and surveys during the summer. European Studies features course work at the University of the South and Oxford in conjunction with visits to sites in Great Britain, Italy, Greece, and Turkey. (More information about European Studies is available in the catalog in the section on “Opportunities for Study Abroad and Off-Campus Study.”) Finally, the college is a member of the American School of Classical Studies in Athens and the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome, which operate centers for study and research in Greece and Italy respectively.

The F10 Degree Requirement. The degree requirement in languages may be met by the successful completion of any appropriate four-credit course numbered 201 or higher or by demonstrating proficiency through placement into a language course at a level above 201 and approval by the appropriate language faculty. Students who take 201 (or higher) or the equivalent at another institution can earn transfer credit, but must still demonstrate proficiency in the specific language before the degree requirement is satisfied. This policy pertains to languages that are taught at Rhodes. Students for whom English is a second language may have this requirement waived.

Course Offerings

150. Language Study.

Fall, Spring. Credits: Variable.

This course allows students to receive credit for studying languages not regularly offered on campus. Information concerning these languages is available from the chair of the department.

245. Texts and Contexts.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F4.

Topics in Greek and Roman literature organized chronologically, thematically, generically, or by geographic region. Topics might include literature of the fourth century BCE, love and gender, the ancient novel, or Alexandrian authors. The course aims to introduce students to the basic methods of reading and writing critically but with an emphasis on the special qualities of ancient texts (production and reception, e.g.). Background in the cultures of Greece and Rome will be offered as necessary to understand the texts in their cultural context. Students may take this course more than once if topics change

250. Serving Gods: Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: Life Then and Now, F1.

This course will use documents and material artifacts to reconstruct the beliefs and rituals of the traditional religions of Greece and Rome. The approach will focus on particular shared aspects of the sacred among the Greeks and Romans. Topics will include Greco-Roman theology, sacrifice and its interpretation, hero cult, the afterlife, oracles and forms of prophecy, maintenance of sanctuaries, philosophical religion and emperor worship.

255. Myth in Ancient Greece and Rome.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: Life Then and Now, F1.

A study of the mythoi from ancient Greece and Rome as transmitted in a variety of multiforms in the literary and the plastic arts, including those from the ancient period and modern adaptations. The course aims to familiarize students with both the basic Greek and Roman myths as well as the major schools of myth interpretation. Interpretative traditions to be covered may include those of the myth and ritual school, the psychoanalysts, and the structuralists.

260. Poetry and Performance.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F4.

This course will examine the relationship between the evolution of poetic genres and the contexts of performance. The approach and range of topics will change from year to year. Examples of topics include Homeric poetry and the role of the oral tradition in the definition and maintenance of communities during the Archaic period; lyric poetry and the function of the persona loquens in the polis; Athenian tragedy and comedy as a reflection of the cultural, economic, and political concerns of Attika and the greater Greek-speaking world; Roman comedy and the interaction between Greek and Roman cultural norms. Students may take this course more than once if topics change.

270. Ancient Political Economy.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F3.

This course provides a broad survey of ancient political economy. The ancients played a very important role in the development of this area of inquiry: they not only invented the term, but were also the first to discover some of the most seminal economic concepts of the western tradition, such as the division of labor, marginal utility, and supply and demand. Perhaps more importantly, they were the first to understand how essential these ideas were for promoting the common good. In addition to examining the economic policies and systems of the major city-states and nations of antiquity and the changes they underwent over time, the course will investigate the political economic thought of the Greek and Roman philosophers, such as Xenophon, Plato, Aristotle, and Cicero.

275. Introduction to Classical Studies.

Spring. Credits: 4.

This course introduces students to the study of the ancient world and its documentary and non-literary domains. Within the former domain, topics of study will include the nature of ancient written texts, scholia, lexica, grammars, commentaries, interpretive analyses, bibliographies, manuscript traditions, and modern scholarly resources. With regard to the non-literary sources of information, students will become familiar with the types of material artifacts used to study the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome and the theoretical approaches to the study. Although students may take this course at any time, majors must take this course before they enroll in GRS 475, which they will normally take in the fall semester of the senior year. Course offered in alternate years; scheduled for 2012-13.

283. Introduction to Study in Europe, the Mediterranean, and the Near East.

Spring. Credits: 1.

This course prepares students to participate in Latin 232: Latin in Rome, GRS 305: Travel-Study in Europe, the Mediterranean, and the Near East, the classical track of European Studies, and other opportunities for travel-study, for example, archaeological field schools and trips to museum collections. This course generally focuses on one country or region (e.g. Egypt, Greece, Italy, or Turkey) each time it is offered. Weekly meetings will cover introductory material on a variety of topics that will prepare students for their travel-study experience. Students will be expected to complete a number of relevant readings, participate in discussions, and attend lectures and other cultural activities.

305. Travel-Study in Europe, the Mediterranean, and the Near East.

Summer. Credits: 4.

This course offers an intensive introduction to the material culture of ancient Mediterranean and Middle Eastern countries. The course generally focuses on one country, e.g., Egypt, Greece, Italy, or Turkey) each time it is offered. Through visits to archaeological sites and museums, the course will cover the evolution of art, architecture, and other aspects of material culture beginning with the period of the earliest human presence and, depending on the region, working through societies of the first millennium CE. The course of travel and study generally lasts four weeks. If possible, students should enroll in at least one of the following courses as preparation for this course: Art 220, 231, 318, 319, 320, History 205 (when appropriate). Students may take this course more than once if the itinerary changes.

315. Fieldwork in Material Culture.

Summer. Credits: 2.

This course allows students to receive credit for participating in an off-campus internship or field school under professional supervision in areas that pertain to the discovery, recovery, preservation, and study of artifacts from ancient or medieval European, Mediterranean, and Near Eastern civilizations.

361. GIS and Mediterranean Archaeology.

Fall. Credits: 4.

This course introduces students to the methods, theories, and practices associated with primary (field or lab) and secondary (library) research in archaeological survey with an emphasis on the use of information technologies, primarily geographical information systems (GIS). Permission of the instructor is required for this course.

474. Introduction to Senior Seminar.

Spring. Credits: 1.

In the spring semesters of their junior years, majors in GRS will prepare for the capstone experience by consulting with members of the faculty to develop topics of inquiry and outline programs of research that will serve as a focus for their work in the discipline both during their senior years and the summers before.

Prerequisites: GRS 275 (Students may take GRS 275 concurrently.)

475. Senior Seminar.

Fall. Credits: 4.

This course represents the capstone experience for all majors in GRS. Although the specific topic of study will vary from year to year depending on the interests and goals of the participants, students will engage in a significant scholarly investigation into some aspect of the ancient world. The students’ work must reflect an engagement with primary materials and their familiarity with and ability to use secondary resources. Students are encouraged to select topics that reflect their interests and postgraduate plans and incorporate their work as majors and minors in fields other than GRS. Normally, the project will culminate in a research paper, but other products are possible, such as a creative work. Generally, seniors will present the results of their work in an oral presentation for other students and faculty members at an event scheduled on campus or at a conference for undergraduate research.

Prerequisites: GRS 474.

476. Senior Seminar: Dissemination

Spring. Credits: 1.

In the spring semester of their senior years, majors in GRS will complete their capstone experiences by working with faculty members on transforming their research into formats for public dissemination primarily as presentations for undergraduate conferences and symposia. They will be responsible for developing abstracts, adapting their projects, and presenting their research in public settings such as the Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity Symposium (URCAS) at Rhodes or the Sunoikisis Undergraduate Research Symposium.

Prerequisites: GRS 475.

495-496. Honors Tutorial.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4-4.

These courses are for students working on an honors project as described above. Permission of the advisor is required for enrollment in these courses.

Greek

101-102. Elementary Greek.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4-4.

This series of courses introduces students to the fundamentals of the ancient Greek language. Although the primary goal of the elementary sequence of courses through Greek 201 is to prepare students to use ancient Greek documents in a wide variety of academic contexts, students will develop all four language skills: reading, writing, listening, and speaking.

201. Intermediate Greek.

Fall. Credits 4.

Degree Requirements: F10.

This course concludes the elementary language sequence and prepares students for more advanced work in the language. During this course, students will make the transition from graded selections in the elementary texts to authentic ancient texts primarily from the fifth and fourth centuries BCE. In addition to developing their ability to comprehend and interpret ancient texts, students will continue to work on their aural-oral proficiency.

Prerequisites: Greek 102 or the permission of the instructor.

203. Koine Greek.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: Life Then and Now, F1, F10.

This course introduces students to koine Greek, the “common” dialect of the post-classical period from ca. 323 BCE to AD 300 and concentrates on the narrative and epistolary texts of the New Testament. Instructors may choose to read in addition some selections from the Greek translation of the Hebrew Scriptures (Septuagint), the Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha, Philo, and Josephus. Its primary aims are to help students improve not only their ability to read ancient Greek texts in the original but also to critically examine them, building upon the skills acquired in the Search and Life programs.

Prerequisites: Greek 102 or the permission of the instructor.

265. Topics in Greek Literature.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 1-4.

Degree Requirements: F4, F10.

In this course advanced students of ancient Greek will read and analyze texts from major works of literature. It will feature materials organized thematically, generically, by period, or by author. Texts in this course will generally represent significant documents for the study of the cultural and literary history of the Greek society and may also be the subjects of study in other courses offered at Rhodes both by GRS and other disciplines. The course will help students develop greater reading fluency and expand their understanding of interpretative approaches. The course will generally be taught as a four-credit course. Students in special circumstances may take the course for one, two, or three credits with the permission of the instructor. The course may be repeated for credit if the topic differs.

Prerequisites: Greek 201 or the equivalent.

291/391. Homeric Poetry.

Fall. Credits: 4.

This course, making extensive use of resources available via the internet, focuses on the earliest literary documents in the Greek language, the poems attributed to Homer. Readings will come primarily from the Iliad and Odyssey, but students should expect to do some work with the Hymns and the Hesiodic corpus as well. Students will participate in a weekly webcast lecture, an on-line discussion moderated by faculty members from institutions that participate in Sunoikisis (www.sunoikisis.org), and weekly tutorials with faculty members at Rhodes. This course is specifically designed for advanced students and will include a rigorous study of the cultural and historical context during the Archaic Period of Greek history as well as the issues of composition and transmission. Students will also become familiar with current interpretative approaches to the material.

Prerequisites: Greek 265 or equivalent. Some familiarity with Greek history is strongly advised.

292/392. Greek Lyric Poetry.

Fall. Credits: 4.

This course, making extensive use of resources available via the internet, focuses on the evolution of major types of Greek poetry, including elegy, monodic lyric, and choral lyric. Students will participate in a weekly webcast lecture, an on-line discussion moderated by faculty members from institutions that participate in Sunoikisis (www.sunoikisis.org), and weekly tutorials with faculty members at Rhodes. This course is specifically designed for advanced students and will include a rigorous study of the cultural and historical context of the Archaic Period. Students will also become familiar with current interpretative approaches to the material.

Prerequisites: Greek 265 or equivalent. Some familiarity with Greek history and Homeric poetry is strongly advised.

293/393. Greek Comedy.

Fall. Credits: 4.
This course, making extensive use of resources available via the internet, focuses on the work of the Athenian comic playwrights. Students will participate in a weekly webcast lecture, an on-line discussion moderated by faculty members from institutions that participate in Sunoikisis (www.sunoikisis.org), and weekly tutorials with faculty members at Rhodes. This course is specifically designed for advanced students and will include a rigorous study of the cultural and historical context during the 5th and 4th centuries BCE. Students will also become familiar with the current interpretative approaches to the material.

Prerequisites: Greek 265 or equivalent. Some familiarity with Greek history, Homeric poetry, the work of the lyric poets, and the literature of the 5th century is strongly advised.

294/394. Literature of the 4th Century BCE.

Fall. Credits: 4.

This course, making extensive use of resources available via the internet, focuses on the work of the Athenian historians, orators, and philosophers who were active in the 4th century BCE. Students will participate in a weekly webcast lecture, an on-line discussion moderated by faculty members from institutions that participate in Sunoiksis (www.sunoikisis.org), and weekly tutorials with faculty members at their home institutions. This course is specifically designed for advanced students and will include a rigorous study of the cultural and historical context during the 4th century BCE. Students will also become familiar with the current interpretative approaches to the material.

Prerequisites: Greek 265 or equivalent. Some familiarity with Greek history, Homeric poetry, the work of the lyric poets, and the literature of the 5th century is strongly advised.

295/395. Hellenistic Literature.

Fall. Credits: 4.

This course, making extensive use of resources available via the internet, focuses on the evolution of Greek literature during the Hellenistic period, which begins with the conquest of Alexander the Great and the founding of the Museum at Alexandria by Ptolemy I Soter. Students will read and study the works of the major authors of the period: Callimachus, Theocritus, and Apollonius of Rhodes as well as epigrams from other writers including Meleager, Philodemus, and Posidippus. Students will participate in a weekly webcast lecture, an on-line discussion moderated by faculty members from institutions that participate in Sunoikisis (www.sunoikisis.org), and weekly tutorials with faculty members at Rhodes. This course is specifically designed for advanced students and will include a rigorous study of the cultural and historical context of the Hellenistic Period. Students will also become familiar with current interpretative approaches to the material.

Prerequisites: Greek 265 or equivalent. Some familiarity with Greek history, Homeric poetry, the work of the lyric poets, and the literature of the 5th century is strongly advised.

415. Tutorial Assistantship.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 2.

Under the direction of the instructor, the tutorial assistant will be responsible for helping plan and conduct the tutorial sessions for elementary students. Assistants will also develop a familiarity with issues concerning second language acquisition and assist in the evaluation of language courses. This course is open only to advanced students and by permission of the instructor.

Hebrew

101-102. Elementary Hebrew.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4-4.

An introduction to classical (biblical) Hebrew. This series of courses will introduce students to the fundamentals of classical Hebrew, focusing on translation and recognition of grammatical forms and syntax. The sequence of courses through Hebrew 201 will prepare students to read and interpret ancient texts for a variety of academic and vocational contexts. Offered in alternate years.

201. Intermediate Hebrew.

Fall. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F10.

An intermediate course in classical (biblical) Hebrew. The course will focus on translation and interpretation of grammatical forms and syntax in narrative prose. The sequence of courses through Hebrew 201 will prepare students to read and interpret ancient texts for a variety of academic and vocational contexts. Offered in alternate years.

Prerequisite: Hebrew 102 or permission of the instructor.

415. Tutorial Assistantship.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 2.

Under the direction of the instructor, the tutorial assistant will be responsible for helping to plan and conduct tutorial sessions for elementary students. Assistants will also be introduced to best practices for language instruction. This course is open only to advanced students and by permission of the instructor.

Latin

101-102. Elementary Latin.

Spring, Fall. Credits: 4-4.

This series of courses introduces students to the fundamentals of the Latin language. Although the primary goal of the elementary sequence of courses through Latin 201 is to prepare students to use Latin documents in a wide variety of academic contexts, students will develop all four language skills: reading, writing, listening, and speaking.

201. Intermediate Latin.

Fall, Spring Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F10.

This course concludes the elementary language sequence and prepares students for more advanced work in the language. During this course students will begin making the transition from graded selections in the elementary texts to authentic ancient texts from a variety of Latin authors and genres from antiquity to the modern period. In addition to developing their ability to comprehend and interpret ancient texts, students will continue to work on their aural-oral proficiency.

Prerequisite: Latin 102 or permission of the instructor.

202. Latin Rhetoric.

Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F2i, F10.

In keeping with the pedagogy of the ancient schools of rhetoric, this course will provide an analytic and comprehensive review of the structures of the language. Students will work toward fluency in reading, composition, and conversation.

232. Latin in Rome.

Summer. Credits: 4.

An intensive reading course examining works of Latin literature pertinent to the study of the topography of Rome. Selections will come from Roman historians, poets, orators, and inscriptions. Class meetings will take place in the city of Rome. Students will visit and analyze sites described in the primary literature; inscriptions review in situ where possible, and study the textual tradition through available manuscripts.

265. Topics in Latin Literature.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 1-4.

Degree Requirements: F4, F10.

In this course advanced students of Latin will read and analyze texts from major works of literature. It will feature materials organized thematically, generically, by period, or by author. Texts in this course will generally represent significant documents for the study of the cultural and literary history of Roman society and may also be the subjects of study in other courses offered at Rhodes both by GRS and other disciplines. The course will help students develop greater reading fluency and expand their understanding of interpretative approaches. The course will generally be taught as a four-credit course. Students in special circumstances may take the course for one, two, or three credits with the permission of the instructor. The course may be repeated for credit if the topic differs.

Prerequisites: Latin 201 or the equivalent.

291/391. Latin Literature from the Early Republic.

Fall. Credits: 4.

This course, making extensive use of resources available via the internet, focuses on the earliest literary documents in the Latin language. Readings will come primarily from the comedies of Plautus and Terence, but students should expect to study other examples of archaic Latin such as the fragments of Ennius’ Annales. Students will participate in a weekly webcast lecture, an on-line discussion moderated by faculty members from institutions that participate in Sunoikisis (www.sunoikisis.org), and weekly tutorials with faculty members at Rhodes. This course is specifically designed for advanced students and will include a rigorous study of the cultural and historical context during the early Republic. Students will also become familiar with current interpretative approaches to the material.

Prerequisites: Latin 265 or equivalent. Some familiarity with Roman history and the literature of the Augustan period is strongly advised.

292/392. Latin Literature from the Late Republic.

Fall. Credits: 4.

This course, making extensive use of resources available via the internet, focuses on the literature of Rome during the Late Republic. Readings will come primarily from the work of Cicero, Catullus, Caesar, and Sallust. Students will participate in a weekly webcast lecture, an on-line discussion moderated by faculty members from institutions that participate in Sunoikisis (www.sunoikisis.org), and weekly tutorials with faculty members Rhodes. This course is specifically designed for advanced students and will include a rigorous study of the cultural and historical context during the Late Republic. Students will also become familiar with the current interpretative approaches to the material.

Prerequisites: Latin 265 or equivalent. Some familiarity with Roman history and the literature of the Augustan period is strongly advised.

293/393. Literature of the Neronian Period.

Fall. Credits: 4.

This inter-institutional collaborative course, making extensive use of resources available via the internet, explores the literature of the early Roman Empire, with a particular emphasis on the works of authors who were active during the period of Nero’s reign. These authors include Seneca, Lucan, and Petronius. Students will participate in a weekly webcast lecture, an on-line discussion moderated by faculty members from institutions that participate in Sunoikisis (www.sunoikisis.org), and weekly tutorials with faculty members at Rhodes. This course is specifically designed for advanced students and will include a rigorous study of the cultural and historical context during the early Principate.

Prerequisites: Latin 265 or equivalent. Some familiarity with Roman history and the literature of the Augustan period is strongly advised.

294/394. Roman Literature, 70-180 CE.

Fall. Credits: 4.

This course, making extensive use of resources available via the internet, explores the society of the Roman Empire through the works of authors who were active during the period beginning with the reign of Vespasian and extending to the death of M. Aurelius. These authors include Martial, Statius, Tacitus, Pliny the Younger, Juvenal, and Apuleius. Students will participate in a weekly webcast lecture, an on-line discussion moderated by faculty members from institutions that participate in Sunoikisis (www.sunoikisis.org), and weekly tutorials with faculty members at Rhodes. This course is specifically designed for advanced students and will require extensive reading in more than one genre of Latin literature and a rigorous study of the cultural and historical context of Rome in the late first and second centuries CE.

Prerequisites: Latin 265 or equivalent. Some familiarity with Roman history and the literature of the Augustan period is strongly advised.

295/395. Latin Literature from Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages.

Fall. Credits: 4.

This course examines the literature produced during and after the dissolution of the Roman empire, beginning approximately with the reforms of Diocletian and Constantine and concluding with the renaissance of secular education in the twelfth century. Texts will include selections from the work of Jerome, Augustine, Prudentius, Alcuin of York, Einhard, Hrotsvitha of Gandersheim, Abelard, Heloise, Hildegard of Bingen, and Walter of Chatillon. Students will participate in a weekly webcast lecture, an on-line discussion moderated by faculty members from institutions that participate in Sunoikisis (www.sunoikisis.org), and weekly tutorials with faculty members at Rhodes. This course is specifically designed for advanced students and will require extensive reading in more than one genre of Latin literature and a rigorous study of the cultural and historical context of Rome and the Latin-speaking world after 180 CE.

Prerequisites: Latin 265 or equivalent. Some familiarity with Roman history and the literature of the Augustan period is strongly advised.

415. Tutorial Assistantship.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 2.

Under the direction of the instructor, the tutorial assistant will be responsible for helping plan and conduct the tutorial sessions for elementary students. Assistants will also develop a familiarity with issues concerning second language acquisition and assist in the evaluation of language courses. This course is open only to advanced students and by permission of the instructor.




PLEASE NOTE: This document reflects information as it was published in the 2014-15 Rhodes Catalogue. You may find more current information elsewhere on rhodes.edu.