Rhodes Study Abroad Programs

ShareThis
Translate

European Studies

European Studies is a sixteen-week program offered jointly by Rhodes and The University of the South (Sewanee) that takes place from mid summer through early Fall. It is a full semester of study abroad and offers the unique experience of studying in a variety of locations in Europe in a special and quite different learning environment. The program begins in July with three weeks of study at The University of the South with Rhodes and Sewanee faculty. The students then travel to England where there is a seven day practicum of archaeology and field work conducted by British tutors at York and the University of Durham, followed by six weeks with British and European instructors at Lincoln College, Oxford. The program closes with five weeks of travel in Western Europe, accompanied by British tutors in Art History.
European Studies offers two academic options or “tracks.” The first track, “Ancient Greece and Rome: The Foundations of Western Civilization,” is a comprehensive study of the thinking and achievement of Ancient Greece and Rome and their importance to Western Civilization. The second track, “Western Europe in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance,” is an integrated cultural portrait of Western Europe in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. They both provide a highly enjoyable experience of other cultures and other academic methods that enriches study back on the Rhodes campus. The experience culminates with extensive, student-authored academic journals that integrate what has been learned in the five weeks of study and travel.

Students in the European Studies program pay their tuition and fees to Rhodes and receive need-based financial aid as granted by Rhodes. Aid is limited to the amount that would be granted in support of a semester’s study at Rhodes. The credits are applied directly to degree requirements and are factored into the Rhodes grade point average.

This curriculum will be offered for the Fall 2014 European Studies program. A total of 18 credits is earned for the successful completion of this program. Courses are approved as meeting major, general or foundational degree requirements in the appropriate department or division as noted. Since courses are developed annually, some variation in topics may occur from year to year although the departments and general fields of study remain constant.

Course Offerings

Track One. Ancient Greece and Rome: The Foundations of Western Civilization.

Greek and Roman Studies 833. From Pericles to Caesar.

Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F1, F3.

This team-taught cross-disciplinary course traces the history of the Mediterranean world from 5th century Athens to the rise of the Roman Empire. Special attention will be given to ancient biography, historiography, and philosophy. The first half of the course, “Pericles and Athens”, will include the study of Plutarch and Thucydides’s accounts of the lives of Pericles and Alcibiades as well as Plato’s Apology and Symposium. In the second half of the course, “The Rise of Rome”, works by Aristotle, Plutarch, Caesar, Cicero and Tacitus will be considered. Common sessions will be followed by individual colloquium sessions.

History 830. War and Society in Classical Greece and Rome.

Credits: 4

Degree Requirements: History major, 200-level course.

This course explores war and society from the Greek Archaic Age in the 8th century BCE to the ‘Crisis’ of the Roman Empire in the 3rd century CE. We shall be looking at changes in the groups who fight wars, and the ways these relate to larger social, economic, and political movements, as well as how war was thought about by participants and non-combatants, and shifts in these attitudes over time. Archaeology is very relevant; the most important evidence, however, is provided by reading literary texts: ranging from the very familiar, such as Homer, Thucydides and Plato, to introductions to the fascinating but lesser known, such as Aeneas Tacitus and Frontinus. Artistic evidence, both public and private, will also be central to this course.

Greek and Roman Studies 834. Ancient Greek and Roman Literature: Greek Lyric Poetry, Tragedy and Comedy, Roman Drama and Love Poetry.

Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: English majors, 200-level course, F4.

This course consists of two parts. Part I traces the development of Greek poetry from the first personal poems of Archilochus and Sappho to the lyric splendor of the Theban Pindar, then the flowering of drama in fifth-century Athens. Plays of each of the three great classical tragedians, Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides are read, as well as Aristophanes’ comedies that extracted humor from subjects surprisingly similar to those that agonized the audiences of tragedy. Part II traces Roman comedy, including the comic poets Plautus and Terence, and the rise of Roman tragedians like Seneca.

Philosophy 835. Plato, Aristotle and the Legacy of Ancient Philosophy.

Credits: 2.

What is knowledge? How should we live? Can I trust my powers of reasoning? What is the nature of mind/soul? These, and other connected questions, were searchingly examined by Plato and Aristotle, and subsequently by Hellenistic thinkers of the Epicurean, Stoic and Neoplatonist schools living in an unsettled period of history. Each year will offer a special topic in philosophy relevant to the ancient world. This course will be taught in the format of an Oxford tutorial with smaller groups of students meeting each week to discuss assigned readings and present short papers.

Art 836. Greece, the Eastern Aegean, and Italy: Art History: Ancient and Byzantine Art and Architecture.

Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: Fine Arts; F5

The travel-study portion of Track One includes a month-long tour of the Continent including Crete, Athens, Delphi, Didyma, Istanbul, Troy, Naples, Pompeii, Herculaneum, Rome and the Vatican City, ending in the final week in London. During the tour, each student keeps a daily academic journal. Most students will never have thought seriously about art, architecture and city structure before going on this program but, by the end of it, each student should have the wherewithal to look at a building or a sculpture and understand its period, its aims, the way it was produced and what the artist intended by it.

F11 credit is granted for satisfactory completion of the entire sequence.

F1 credit is granted for Hist/Phil in Sewanee in combination with Phil course in Oxford.

Track Two. Western Europe in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.

History 834 or Religious Studies 830. History and Religion in Medieval Europe.

Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F1, F3. Humanities (History); Life (Rel. Studies)

This course covers the history of Europe during the Middle Ages, roughly from 500-1500 CE. It is also intended to introduce students to the rise of Christianity as a world religion within the Roman Empire, leading to its eventual domination in Western Europe, and to its interaction with medieval Judaism and emerging Islam. The course combines the study of religion with that of history, precisely because one of the features of the Middle Ages was the centrality of religion to politics, society, and culture. Common sessions will be followed by individual colloquia.

History 844. European Life in the late Middle Ages and Renaissance.

Credits: 2.

This tutorial will examine various aspects of life in the late Middle Ages and Renaissance. Each year will offer a special topic relevant to the period. This course will be taught in the format of an Oxford tutorial with smaller groups of students meeting each week to discuss assigned readings and present short papers. This course does not count towards credits for the History major.

English 841. Arthurian Literature, Shakespeare and the Elizabethan Theatre: from Allegory to Inwardness.

Credits: 4.

Degree Requirement: F4.

This course will begin with the exploration of the history and literary development of the greatest medieval hero – Arthur, king of the Britons – with special concentration on the trials of heroic identity in medieval literature. The study goes from the first story of Arthur in Geoffrey of Monmouth’s History of the Kings of Britain through the development of the legend in French courtly and spiritual literature, to Thomas Malory’s Morte D’Arthur. The second part of the course will address the representation of the trials of heroic character found in English Renaissance literature. Plays to include Marlowe’s Dr. Faustus and Jew of Malta, and Shakespeare’s Hamlet and Merchant of Venice.

Art 843. Western Europe: Middle Ages and the Renaissance.

Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

This course, in two parts, provides a broad-based, chronological survey of the art and architecture of Western Europe in the Middle Ages from the fourth century to the Renaissance. It introduces many of the themes and works of art that are explored further on the Continental tour. Slide lectures trace the general developments of styles throughout the period, set within their historical contexts, as well as focusing on individual buildings, manuscripts, pieces of sculpture, metalwork or paintings as case studies of technique or patronage. Visits to the Bodleian Library and Ashmolean Museum enable students to view examples of the objects studied in the course first hand.

Art 833. Artistic Centers of Western Europe: Their Art and Architecture, Museums and Monuments.

Credits: 4.

The travel–study portion of Track Two includes a month–long tour of the Continent including Paris, Beaune, Rome, Florence, Venice, Ravenna, Nürnberg, Munich, Bruges, Ghent, and concludes in Londonduring the final week of the program. During the tour, each student keeps a daily academic journal. Most students will never have thought seriously about art, architecture and city structure before going on this program, but, by the end of it, each student should have the wherewithal to look at a building or a sculpture and understand its period, its aims, the way it was produced and what the artist intended by it.

F11 is granted for the satisfactory completion of the entire sequence




PLEASE NOTE: This document reflects information as it was published in the 2014-15 Rhodes Catalogue. You may find more current information elsewhere on rhodes.edu.