Reserve Officer Training Programs

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Rhodes, in cooperation with the University of Memphis and the Departments of the Army and Air Force, participates in crosstown agreements that provide the opportunity for Rhodes students to enroll in Aerospace Studies (Air Force ROTC) and Military Science (Army ROTC) at The University of Memphis. Upon successful completion of the reserve officer training programs and the undergraduate degree at Rhodes, a student receives a commission as a second lieutenant in the appropriate military service.

The curriculum for the ROTC program is reviewed by the Faculty of Rhodes and the appropriate credits are assigned. The student who participates in the ROTC programs will have to complete all requirements as specified by the military service departments, including summer training camps, if the commission as an officer is to be granted.

A Rhodes student may earn a maximum of sixteen credits in the ROTC programs and apply fourteen of these credits to the 128 credits needed for a Rhodes degree. In addition, for each course completed in the ROTC program, the student will receive credit for one of the three half-semester courses in Physical Education that are required for graduation. Credit earned in ROTC is counted as elective credit, and it is listed on the student’s transcript as ROTC credit with the appropriate course titles. Credits enrolled in during a given semester are included in the count of credits for a normal course load. (The credit shown below applies to the 16-credit provision.) Although a student takes the ROTC courses at The University of Memphis, that student is a full-time student at Rhodes, and any financial assistance provided by the military services is based on tuition and fees at Rhodes.

Aerospace Studies

The Aerospace Studies program is in two parts. The first-year/sophomore-level program, the General Military Course, is open to all students. The junior/senior level program, the Professional Officer Course, is available only to selected, eligible students who desire to earn commissions as officers in the United States Air Force while pursuing their academic studies at Rhodes. Participants in the POC program and those in the GMC on AFROTC scholarships receive a monthly subsistence allowance from the Air Force. Graduate students who qualify are also eligible for POC enrollment.

Air Force ROTC scholarships which pay all or a portion of certain college costs (tuition, book allowance, and certain fees) are available on a competitive basis, to entering first-year students and to cadets participating in the AFROTC program. Details are available from the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid or from the Department of Aerospace Studies at the University of Memphis. Students wishing to participate should contact the Unit Admissions Officer, AFROTC Detachment 785, Department of Aerospace Studies, University of Memphis, at 678-2681. Students may also access AFROTC Detachment 785’s website at www.afrotc.memphis.edu and/or the AFROTC website at www.afrotc.com.

Course Offerings

General Military Courses.

111-112. Air Force Today.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 1-1.

Survey course designed to introduce students to the United States Air Force and Air Force ROTC. Topics include Air Force mission and organization, customs and courtesies, officer opportunities, problem solving, and communication skills. One class hour per week and one and one-half hours of Leadership Laboratory.

211-212. The Air Force Way.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 1-1.

Survey course designed to examine aspects of air and space power through a historical perspective. The course covers the time period from the first balloons and dirigibles to the space age global positioning systems of the Persian Gulf War. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets. One class hour per week and one and one-half hours of Leadership Laboratory.

Professional Officer Courses.

311-312. Air Force Leadership and Management.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 3-3.

Study of leadership, Air Force personnel and evaluation systems, management fundamentals, professional knowledge, leadership ethics, and communication skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Case studies are used to demonstrate and exercise practical application of concepts studied. Three class hours per week and one and one-half hours of Leadership Laboratory.

411-412. Preparation for Active Duty.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 3-3.

Examines the national security process, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Special topics include the military as a profession, officership, military justice, civilian control of the military, and preparation for active duty. Within this structure, continued emphasis is given to refining communication skills. Three class hours per week and one and one half hours of Leadership Laboratory.

Aerospace Studies.

301. Field Training.

Summer. Credits: 0.

Twenty-eight day course conducted during summer at active installation of USAF, consists of approximately 185 hours of instruction in Air Force base functions, leadership, physical training, Air Force environment, career orientation, and survival training. Students assigned to groups of twenty-five and individually counseled and evaluated on their performance. Emphasis on self initiated leadership activities.

302. Field Training.

Summer. Credits: 0.

Forty-two day course conducted during summer at active installation of USAF. Consists of approximately 258 hours of instruction on role of military forces, organization of Defense Department, instruments of national security, Air Force base functions, leadership, physical training and Air Force environment. Students are assigned to groups of approximately twenty-five and individually counseled and evaluated on their performance.

Leadership Laboratory.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 0-0.

Freshman/Sophomore level topics (supporting the General Military Course) include Air Force customs and courtesies, drill and ceremonies, issuing military commands, instructing, environment of the Air Force officer, and officer opportunities. Junior/Senior level topics (supporting the Professional Officer Course) include such advanced leadership experiences as planning and controlling cadet wing activities, preparing and presenting oral and written communication, and providing the guidance and information needed to train and motivate other cadets. One and one-half hours per week.

Military Science

The Military Science program is divided into two courses each of two years’ duration. The first, the Basic Course, offers instruction in leadership skills, soldiering skills, and the role and use of armed forces.

The second, the Advanced Course, builds on the Basic Course, offers practical leadership experience, and prepares the student for commissioning as an Army officer. Students may apply for the four-year program (which can be completed in three years with department permission) or the two-year program.

The Basic Course is open to all students and involves classes of one or two hours per week. Enrollment in the basic course creates no military obligation.

The Advanced Course is available only to selected, eligible cadets who desire to earn a commission while pursuing their studies at Rhodes. Cadets enrolled in the Advanced Course receive a subsistence allowance of up to $1500 per year during the Junior and Senior years (paid at $150 per month).

Army ROTC Scholarships are available on a competitive basis. The scholarship pays up to $16,000 toward tuition and fees and provides an annual allowance for books and supplies. Scholarship students receive the subsistence allowance for the period of the scholarship. Scholarship applications for first year students must be submitted by November 15th.

Students desiring more information or wishing to participate in the program should contact Captain Gray in the Department of Military Science at The University of Memphis: www.armyrotc.net.

100. Leadership Laboratory.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 0.

Two laboratory hours per week.

Corequisite: Military Science 111 or 112.

111. Introduction to Military Science.

Fall. Credits: 1.

Introduction to Army ROTC with hands-on approach through several basic military skills. Lectures and practical exercises in following areas: rappelling, communications, weapons, first aid, and land navigation. There is no military obligation.

Corequisite: Military Science 100; there is no military obligation.

112. Principles of Leadership and Confidence Building.

Spring. Credits: 0.

Basic military first aid skills; lectures and practical exercises in basic emergency treatment for fractures, lacerations, heat and cold injuries; cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

Corequisite: Military Science 100; there is no military obligation.

200. Leadership Laboratory.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 0.

Two laboratory hours per week.

Corequisite: Military Science 210 or 211; two hours per week.

210. American Military History.

Fall. Credits: 3.

Developments since colonial period; emphasis on background and growth of national military and naval establishments; military and naval thought; difficulties accompanying modernization and assumption of global responsibilities; and problems of relationship between civilian and military naval sectors in democracy.

Corequisite: Military Science 200; there is no military obligation.

211. Fundamental Survival.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 0.

Basic Military Skills including map reading, military first aid skills and small unit leadership. One hour weekly classroom instruction.

Corequisite: Military Science 200; there is no military obligation.

214. Small Unit Tactics I.

Fall. Credits: 0.

Emphasis on preparation of the individual for combat. Preparation of potential leaders in combat through study of the knowledge and skills needed by an individual soldier. Skill developed in planning and organizing by combat patrols. This course includes series of field practica; there is no military obligation.

215. Small Unit Tactics II.

Fall. Credits: 0.

Advanced concepts in reconnaissance, raid, and ambush patrolling techniques, extended patrolling operations, and application techniques for specialized equipment; leadership skills through student led patrols. This course includes a series of field practica; there is no military obligation.

300. Leadership Laboratory.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 0.

Two laboratory hours per week.

Corequisite: Military Science 311 or 312; two hours per week.

311. Applied Leadership I.

Fall. Credits: 3.

Presentation, discussion, practical exercise, and field training on fundamentals of map reading and land navigation; development of skills in individual and small unit tactical planning and operations; and professional subjects in leadership, leadership assessment, and principles of war. Three lecture hours per week, three hours physical training per week, and field training exercises on two weekends during semester.

Prerequisite: Permission of the Professor of Military Science.

Corequisite: Military Science 300.

312. Applied Leadership II.

Spring. Credits: 3.

Continuation of first year advanced course.

Prerequisite: Permission of the Professor of Military Science.

Corequisite: Military Science 300.

400. Leadership Laboratory.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 0.

Two laboratory hours per week.

Corequisite: Military Science 411 or 412; two hours per week.

411. Seminar in Leadership and Planning.

Fall. Credits: 3.

Leadership and management skill development in specific areas of oral and written communications, training management, personnel evaluation and counseling, personnel management systems of Army, U.S. Army logistic systems, military justice, and familiarization with ethics of military professional. This course, in conjunction with ARMY 4121, completes the cadet’s preparation for commissioning as a Second Lieutenant in the Army Reserve or National Guard. Three lecture hours every week, three hours physical training each week, and field training exercises on two weekends during semester.

Prerequisite: Permission of the Professor of the Military Science.

Corequisite: Military Science 400.

412. Seminar in Organizational Leadership.

Spring. Credits: 3.

Continuation of second year advanced course.

Prerequisite: Permission of the Professor of Military Science.

Corequisite: Military Science 400.




PLEASE NOTE: This document reflects information as it was published in the 2014-15 Rhodes Catalogue. You may find more current information elsewhere on rhodes.edu.