Psychology

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Professors

Natalie K. Person. 1994. Chair. B.A., University of Mississippi; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Memphis. (Cognitive; learning technologies; educational psychology.)
Marsha D. Walton. 1979. B.A., M.A., and Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. (Developmental; narrative and social interaction.)

Associate Professors

Bette J. Ackerman. 1987. B.A., Eckerd College; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Florida. (Program evaluation; health psychology; social theories of self.)
Anita A. Davis. 1996. B.A., Rhodes College; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. (Clinical; community; interventions with minority populations; adolescent motherhood.)
Kimberly M. Gerecke. 2006. B.S., Muskingum College; M.S., University of Richmond. Ph.D. University of Alabama at Birmingham. (Neuroscience; exercise and neurodegeneration.)
Elizabeth Thomas. 1998. B.A., Georgetown University, Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. (Urban Studies; community psychology; psychology and the arts.)
Christopher G. Wetzel. 1982. B.A., M.A., and Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. (Social; social cognition; prejudice.)
Katherine White. 2009. B.A., Rhodes College; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Florida. (Cognitive and sensory processing; cognitive aging.)

Assistant Professors

Jonathan Cook. 2013. B.S., Andrews University; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Missouri. (Clinical; stigma and mental illness; media portrayal of mental illness.)
Jason Haberman. 2014. Ph.D, University of California at Davis, Psychology, 2010, MA, University of California at Davis, Psychology, 2007, BA, Colgate University, Double Major in Behavioral Neuroscience & Music, 2001
Jamie Jirout.B.A., University of Miami; M.A. and Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University. (Educational psychology: scientific curiosity and persistence; spatial processing.)
Rebecca Klatzkin. 2011. B.S., University of Richmond; M.A., and Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. (Neuroscience: behavioral endocrinology; stress-related psychopathology.)
Geoffrey Maddox. 2013. B.A., University of Missouri; M.A., and Ph.D., Washington University, St. Louis. (Cognitive: Aging and development.)

Staff

Christy Waldkirch. Departmental Assistant.

Requirements for Major in Psychology

A total of 11 courses or forty-four (44) credits in the major as follows:

  1. Psychology 150 to be taken as early as possible in the student’s course of study.
  2. Psychology 200 and 211 should be taken as early as possible. Ideally they should be completed by the spring semester of the sophomore year.
  3. One advanced methods course from among Psychology 350 – 352 or Neuroscience 350 (must be taken by the end of the junior year.)
  4. Three core content courses: Psychology 229, 323, 326, 327; one of the following may count as one core requirement: Neuroscience 270, Psychology 216, or 345.
  5. One community-based or independent investigation course: Psychology 229, 338, 451, 452, 460, 495, or 496; Education 460.
  6. Two other courses in psychology (only one 105 course may count.)
  7. Psychology 485 to be taken during the senior year.

Requirements for a Minor in Psychology

A total of 6 courses or twenty-four (24) credits as follows:

  1. Psychology 150.
  2. Psychology 200.
  3. Four additional psychology courses to be chosen in consultation with a departmental advisor and to be approved by the department chair. These will be selected to coordinate with the student’s major and career aspirations, and will normally include at least one 300- or 400-level course. Only one 105 course may count.

Major Essay

When declaring a major in psychology, students must submit an essay in which they articulate their educational goals. The essay should be four paragraphs, with one paragraph dedicated to each of the questions below (question 3 has two parts.)

  1. In your opinion, what are the defining characteristics of the discipline of Psychology?
  2. How do the requirements for the Psychology major complement your program of liberal arts study and support your career or life goals?
  3. As a Psychology major, how will you (a) build on your strengths and (b) address your weaknesses?

The entire essay should be between 250 and 1000 words and must accompany the Declaration of Major form when a student has the initial meeting with her/his major advisor. A student may choose to revise the essay after meeting with the advisor. Students will electronically submit the final, advisor approved, version of the essay as a Word document to the psychology departmental assistant so that it can be archived. The file name for the essay should be as follows: student’s last name, student’s first name, and graduation year. Each student will revisit the major essay in the senior seminar course.

Honors in Psychology

Members of the faculty of the Department of Psychology encourage students of exceptional academic accomplishment to pursue research with a departmental faculty sponsor that is of an in-depth, rigorous nature; this work will introduce the student to the quality of research one would normally experience in a graduate program. Because the level of involvement of the student and his or her faculty sponsor will be greater in Honors research than that in either a Tutorial or Directed Inquiry, the faculty of the Department of Psychology have established rules for student admission into the Departmental Honors Program. The policies are described on the department website. It is recommended that students interested in pursuing department honors enroll in Junior Seminar 399.

Course Offerings

105. Special Topics in Psychology.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F2, F8 (some sections.)

This course is designed for the non-psychology major and will examine a different general-interest topic each time it is taught. Students will be exposed to the five major theoretical perspectives and to research methods as they pertain to a thematic topic such as ‘close relationships,’ ‘psychology of the self,’ ‘drugs, brain, and behavior,’ etc.

150. Introduction to Psychological Science.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F8.

Students will focus on major themes that underlie and define the discipline of psychology. The aim of this course is to foster an appreciation of the role of scientific reasoning in refining our common sense notions about human behavior and experience. Students will be introduced to the major theoretical perspectives and to the basic principles of psychological methods.

200. Research Methods and Statistics.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.

Students will be taught critical thinking and scientific reasoning skills. Topics include: philosophy of science and the scientific method, measurement theory (reliability and validity), the basics of research design (control variables, rival hypotheses, and confoundings), and elementary statistical analysis.

Prerequisite: Psychology 150 or the permission of the instructor.

211. Statistical Methods.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F6.

Statistical methods are an integral part of social sciences, particularly psychology, as they provide the tools that are needed to reveal patterns in complex behavior. Students will develop an appreciation of the role of statistics and knowledge of the major tests that demonstrate differences and relationships. Math 111 cannot be substituted for this course.

Prerequisite: Psychology 150 or the permission of the instructor.

216. Perception and Sensation.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

A survey of theories and research concerning sensation and perception focusing on how we construct an internal representation of the external world from the evidence of our senses.

Prerequisite: Psychology 150 or the permission of the instructor.

220. Psychology of Health.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

The knowledge base and methodology of psychology will be applied to an understanding of health and illness. Topics to be covered will include risk factors, behaviors impacting specific illnesses, health delivery systems, and health maintenance.

Prerequisite: Psychology 150 or the permission of the instructor.

222. Educational Psychology.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

A study of thoughts and actions as they relate to how we teach and learn, particularly in school settings. Emphasis will be placed on the use of theory to guide practical instruction and the use of assessment to determine instructional effectiveness. Cognitive processes, individual differences, strategies for instruction, motivation, critical thinking, and self-regulation of learning will be stressed.

Prerequisite: Psychology 150, or Education 201, or the permission of the instructor.

224. Psychological Disorders.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

The phenomenology, etiology, and treatment of the major forms of psychological disorders, including schizophrenia, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and personality disorders. We will evaluate theories and research concerning these disorders from psychobiological, behavioral, cognitive, sociocultural, and psychodynamic perspectives.

Prerequisite: Psychology 150 or the permission of the instructor.

229. Developmental Psychology: Infancy and Childhood.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F11 (some sections.)

A study of developmental principles, focusing on research relevant to prenatal development, infancy, and childhood. Theories of emotional, cognitive, and personality development will be examined. Students will consider the implications of developmental research for social and educational policy that affects the welfare of children. F11 sections include a 10-hour community-based learning requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 150, Education 210, or the permission of the instructor.

230. Adolescent and Early Adult Development.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Theories and research on adolescent and early adult development will be applied to educational and social policy issues pertaining to identity work and the accomplishment of other developmental tasks typically undertaken during the teens and twenties.

Prerequisite: Psychology 150, or Education 201, or the permission of the instructor.

232. Psychology of Gender and Language.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Students will consider research and theory on the ways that gender is established and enacted in language structures and in discourse practices. We will critically examine research on gender differences in language use and we will play with linguistic forms and speaking styles that seem to be gendered in some cultural communities. Students will collect data on their own and their classmates’ speech habits and will endeavor to develop discourse skills that allow them to be intentional about appropriating and resisting gender norms, as the situation demands.

Prerequisite: Psychology 150, or Gender and Sexuality Studies 201, or any Theatre course.

250. Community Psychology.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

This course provides an introduction to community psychology, focusing on historical foundations, theory, methods, and practice. In this course, students will learn about the basic theories and concepts that define community psychology while becoming familiar with examples of effective community action and research. Students will have the opportunity to examine the potential relevance of community psychology for addressing social problems.

Prerequisite: Psychology 150, or Urban Studies 240, or the permission of the instructor.

270. Neuroscience.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.

This course examines the structure and function of the nervous system. Topics range from communication within individual neurons to higher order brain functions such as learning, memory, perception, states of consciousness, language and the regulation of motivation and emotion. Psychiatric and neurological disorders will also be discussed. Particular attention will be given to methods and research design in the Neurosciences.

Prerequisites: Biology 130 and 140, or Psychology 150.

306. Language and Communication.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

A discussion of recent theory and research on human language. Topics to be covered include language development, the relationship between language and thought, and the relationship between language and culture.

Prerequisites: Psychology 150 and junior or senior standing, or permission of the instructor. Non-psychology majors with a special interest in language or theatre are welcomed in this course.

309. Judgment and Decision Making.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

An examination of how people make judgments about themselves and others, attribute causation to human behavior, and make judgments or decisions about courses of action.

Prerequisite: Psychology 211, or Math 111, or Economics 290, or the permission of the instructor.

323. Social Psychology.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Study of social behavior, including such topics as interpersonal attraction, altruism, aggression, conformity, group dynamics, leadership, intergroup conflict and negotiation, attitude change, person perception, and the social aspects of environmental and health psychology.

Prerequisites: Psychology 150 and either Psychology 200, Math 111, Economics 290, or the permission of the instructor.

324. Evidence-based Therapies.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.

This course is a survey of the empirical development, implementation, and dissemination of current practices of psychotherapy. In particular, the course will utilize scientific knowledge to answer the question, “For whom does this psychological intervention work, and under what conditions?” The importance of multicultural contributions and competencies will also be emphasized throughout the course. Case conceptualization skills will be learned and practiced, using DSM-5 diagnoses to inform selection and implementation of an indicated evidence-based therapy.

Prerequisites: Psychology 150, Psychology 224, must have Junior or Senior standing, or the permission of the instructor.

326. Motivation and Behavior Analysis.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

This course will introduce students to behavioral theories of animal and human learning. We will examine, classical conditioning, reinforcement, operant condition, the role of emotion in learning, and the relation between learning and motivation. Perspectives on motivation, including behavioral and social cognitive approaches will be discussed, especially as they relate to learning theory.

Prerequisites: Psychology 150 and 211, or the permission of the instructor.

327. Cognitive Processes.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

This course will provide a comprehensive account of recent cognitive theory and research on thinking and problem solving. Some of the topics that will be covered include language acquisition, inductive and deductive reasoning, problem solving, decision making, and text comprehension.

Prerequisites: Psychology 150 and Psychology 200 or 211, or the permission of the instructor.

338. Psychological Assessment.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F11.

Psychometric principles of test construction and issues of reliability and validity of contemporary psychological tests will be covered. Students will learn accepted practices and critical issues in the administration and interpretation of psychological tests.

Prerequisite: Psychology 211 or the permission of the instructor.

345. Cognitive Neuroscience.

Fall, Credits: 4.

This course examines the link between brain and behavior from the systems level. We will explore the major cognitive systems, including object recognition, attention, memory, language, emotion, social cognition, and executive function, as well as broad-based topics such as brain plasticity and cognitive perspectives on psychopathology.

Prerequisite: Neuroscience 270 or Psychology 327 or the permission of the instructor.

350. Advanced Topics in Research Methods: Randomized Experiments.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Students will conduct a laboratory or field research experiment on human participants. Note: Must be taken by the end of the junior year.

Prerequisites: Psychology 200 and 211, or the permission of the instructor.

351. Advanced Topics in Research Methods: Community/Program Evaluation.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Students will gain experience in program evaluation, community psychology, and with the design and collection of survey data. Counts as an applied psychology course. Note: Must be taken by the end of the junior year. Psychology 250 is strongly recommended prior to enrolling in this course.

Prerequisites: Psychology 200 and 211, or the permission of the instructor.

352. Advanced Topics in Research Methods: Observational/Qualitative.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Students will collect and/or analyze qualitative and/or observational research data. Note: Must be taken by the end of the junior year.

Prerequisites: Psychology 200 and 211, or the permission of the instructor.

399. Junior Seminar.

Spring. Credits: 1.

A survey of contemporary research on selected topics, to be taken in preparation for honors research. Open only to junior psychology majors.

Prerequisite: The permission of a faculty member who agrees to supervise the project.

408. Advanced Topics in Psychology.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 2-4.

An issue of current interest and importance in psychology will be explored in depth. Topics will be announced each time the course is offered.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

451-452. Research Practicum

Fall - Spring. Credits: 1-4.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

460. Internship in Psychology.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4-8.

Supervised experience in applying psychological knowledge and principles in a real-world setting for junior and senior psychology majors. Students prepare a research paper or a literature review on a topic related to the internship, work on a project with the off-campus supervisor, and keep a journal. Only 4 internship credits may count towards the major. This is a pass/fail course.

Prerequisites: Specific courses relevant to the internship project. Permission of the instructor and an off-campus supervisor is required. All internships must be approved and finalized in the semester prior to enrollment.

485. Senior Seminar.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.

Psychology majors are required to enroll in Senior Seminar during the senior year. Senior seminar is intended to be a capstone experience in Psychology, requiring both oral and written work.

Prerequisites: Senior standing, 32 credits of Psychology, including Psychology 200, 211, and an Advanced Methods course (Psychology 350-352 or Neuroscience 350.)

495-496. Honors Tutorial.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4-8.

Maximum of 12 hours credit. For students accepted into the honors program of the department to do independent research




PLEASE NOTE: This document reflects information as it was published in the 2014-15 Rhodes Catalogue. You may find more current information elsewhere on rhodes.edu.