Music

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PROFESSOR

William M. Skoog. 2009. Chair. B.A., Gustavus Adolphus College; M.A., University of Denver; D.A., University of Northern Colorado. (Director of Choral Activities, Conducting, Voice.)

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

Carole Choate Blankenship. 1990. B.A., Rhodes College; M.M., D.M.A., University of Memphis. (Voice, Music Theory, Music Literature.)

Thomas E. Bryant. 1987. B.M., M.M., University of Georgia; D.M., Northwestern University. (Collaborative Piano, Music Literature.)

Courtenay L. Harter. 2000. B.F.A., Carnegie Mellon University; M.M., Northwestern University; Ph.D., University of Connecticut. (Music Theory, Oboe/English Horn, Chamber Music.)

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS

John B. Bass, III. 2010. B.M., University of Southern Mississippi; M.M., Ph.D., University of Memphis. (Guitar, Jazz Ensemble, Music History and Literature.)

Vanessa L. Rogers. 2010. B.M.E., Illinois Wesleyan University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Southern California, Los Angeles. (Musicology, Music History and Literature.)

ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS

Laurence Albert. B.M., Morehouse College. (Voice.)

Mike Assad. B.M., University of Kentucky; M.M., University of Memphis. (Percussion, World Drum Ensemble.)

David Carlisle. B.M., Eastman School of Music; M.M., University of Toronto. Memphis Symphony Orchestra. (Percussion, Percussion Ensemble.)

Sara Chiego. B.M., University of Memphis; M.M., Cincinnati Conservatory of Music. Memphis Symphony Orchestra. (Double Bass.)

James A. Cornfoot. B.A., Rhodes College; M.M., University of North Carolina-Greensboro. (Choral, Music History and Literature.)

Andrew Drannon. B.A., Rhodes College; M.M., University of Memphis. (Collaborative Pianist, Music Technology, Composition.)

Rena Feller. B.M., Oberlin College Conservatory of Music; M.M., The Juilliard School. Memphis Symphony Orchestra. (Clarinet.)

Sandra Franks. B.M., University of Mississippi; M.M., Louisiana State University; D.M.A., University of Mississippi. (Voice.)

Robert Gilbert. B.M., Indiana University. (French Horn.)

James O. Harr. B.A., Rhodes College; M.M., Washington University, St. Louis. (Voice.)

Mona B. Kreitner. B.M., Mansfield University; M.M., Eastman School of Music; Ph.D., University of Memphis. (Voice, Rhodes Women’s Chorus, Music History and Literature.)

David T. Lay. B.M., Lambuth University. (Guitar, Contemporary Commercial Music Ensemble.)

Gina Neupert. B.M., Indiana University; M.M., University of Southern California. (Harp.)

Brian Ray. B.M., University of Tennessee at Martin; M.M., University of Memphis; D.M.A., University of Memphis. (Piano, Department Collaborative Pianist.)

Jennifer Rhodes. B.M., Eastman School of Music; M.M., D.M.A., The Juilliard School. Memphis Symphony Orchestra. (Bassoon, Music History and Literature.)

John Ross. B.M., Northern Illinois University; M.M., Illinois State University. (Guitar, Guitar Ensemble.)

Jane Gerard-Schranze. B.M., Eastman School of Music; M.M., New England Conservatory. (Viola, Violin.)

Christopher T. Skitch. B.M., University of Toronto; Licentiate in Music, McGill University-Montreal. Memphis Symphony Orchestra. (Flute.)

Debra H. Smith. B.M., Mississippi College; M.M., University of Memphis. (Piano, Organ, Music Literature and Theory.)

Gerald Stephens. B.F.A., Commercial Music/Recording Technology, University of Memphis. (Jazz Piano, Jazz Combo.)

Kate Stimson. B.A., Hollins College; M.M, University of Memphis. (Piano.)

Lester Robert Sunda, Jr. (Jazz Bass Guitar.)

Mark Vail. B.M., University of North Texas. Memphis Symphony Orchestra. (Trombone, Low Brass.)

Yukiko Whitehead. B.M., University of Tennessee; M.M., D.M.A., University of Memphis; Yamaha Music Foundation Suzuki Piano Teachers Certificate, Suzuki Association of America. (Piano.)

Susanna Whitney. B. M., Cleveland Institute of Music; Artist Diploma, Cleveland Institute of Music. Memphis Symphony Orchestra. (Bassoon, Chamber Music.)

Carl R. Wolfe. U.S. Navy Chief Musician (ret.); U.S. Armed Forces School of Music. Memphis Jazz Orchestra. (Saxophone.)

Wen-Yih Yu. Diploma, National Academy of Arts, Taiwan; M.M., Mannes College of Music. Memphis Symphony Orchestra. (Violin, String Quartet.)

Iren Zombor. B.A., Franz Liszt Conservatory of Music, Hungary; M.A., University of Massachusetts-Amherst. Memphis Symphony Orchestra. (Cello, String Quartet.)

STAFF

Amy Wilson. Administrative Assistant. B.B.A., M.M., University of Memphis.

Dennis Holland. Piano Technician.

Becoming a Major in Music:

Students intending to major in music are required to pass an audition on their principal instrument. This audition will take place during their semester jury/exam, which can be as early as their first semester of study, but is recommended to occur no later than mid-sophomore year. They must complete a Declaration of Major form which includes: an outline of their proposed course of study, an essay which details why they wish to major in music, and consultation with their academic advisor.

Sophomore-Year Review

Music majors are required to undergo a sophomore-year review. This review includes assessment of all previous juries (at least three semesters of study on their principal instrument), and an interview with full-time music faculty, which will take place in January of the student’s sophomore year. This review helps assess academic and artistic progress, and helps focus direction for the remainder of their undergraduate studies in music.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN MUSIC:

A total of fifty-six (56) credits as follows:

  1. Three Music Theory Courses (12 credits)
    • Music 204, 205, 206.
  2. Three Music History & Literature courses (12 credits)
    1. Two from the survey sequence: Music 227, 228, 229.
    2. One F9 elective from Music 117, 118, 119, or selected 105 sections.
  3. Two 4-credit Music electives, not including Music 101. (8 credits) Courses from Music 160-199 do not fulfill this requirement.
  4. Performance (16 credits)
    1. Music 160-178. (8 credits on their principal instrument: 1 credit per semester for 8 semesters)
    2. Music 190-194. (8 credits in departmentally approved ensembles)
    3. Music 100. (0 credit: departmental convocation and concert attendance, every semester after the major is declared, a minimum of 4 semesters)
      • Note: A limited number of small ensemble credits (Music 195-198) may be substituted for large ensemble credits with departmental approval.
  5. Senior Experience (8 credits)
    • Music 414, 415, 485, 486.

Once declared, Music majors will have the Applied Music fees waived for up to eight (8) credits of their principal applied instrument. Music majors taking more than eight (8) credits of Applied Music and lessons taken prior to declaration of the major will be charged the applied fee for those credits.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN MUSIC:

A total of twenty-eight (28) credits as follows:

  1. Two of the following Music Theory courses (8 credits) as determined by placement:
    1. Music 103 and 204, or
    2. Music 204 and 205, or
    3. Music 205 and 206
  2. One of the Music History and Literature survey courses (4 credits):
    • Music 227, 228, 229.
  3. Performance (8 credits):
    1. Music 160-178. (4 credits)
    2. Music 190-194. (4 credits) Departmentally approved ensembles. A limited number of small ensemble credits (Music 195-198) may be substituted for large ensemble credits with departmental approval.
    3. Music 100. (0 credit: departmental convocation and concert attendance, every semester after the minor is declared, a minimum of 4 semesters)
  4. Music electives:
    • Two 4-credit music courses. (8 credits)
    • Note: Courses from Music 160-199 do not fulfill this requirement.

Once declared, Music minors will have the Applied Music fees waived for up to four (4) credits of their principal applied instrument. Music minors taking more than four (4) credits of Applied Music and lessons taken prior to declaration of the minor will be charged the applied fee for those credits.

HONORS IN MUSIC

  1. Fulfillment of the requirements for a major in music.
  2. Intensive work in at least one of the following areas: music history, music theory, performance, conducting, or composition.
  3. A substantial in-depth thesis or creative project in one or more of the areas studied.

MUSIC THEORY PLACEMENT

A music theory placement test is given by the department to determine a student’s skill level. Any student demonstrating the appropriate degree of proficiency may start the theory sequence with either Music 204 or 205. Students may, alternatively, fulfill this prerequisite by taking Music 103 before beginning the theory sequence. Music majors and minors who encounter a closed music course in the registration process should contact the instructor to be admitted.

Course Offerings

100. Performance Attendance.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 0. 

Required for all declared music majors, interdisciplinary majors, and music minors. The students will attend select concerts on campus and in the Memphis community. Specific requirements vary from semester to semester. See Department Coordinator for details.

101. Music: A Sound Experience.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

This course is designed to increase knowledge of the history and traditions of Western art music. A primary goal of the course is to develop greater skill in active listening. While the focus of the course is the European classical tradition from 1600 to the present, discussions will also include early music, American traditions, and excursions into world music, to provide a greater appreciation of the larger musical world. This course is for students who are not music majors or minors.

103. Elements of Music.

Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

This course is designed for the student who is curious about how music is organized, as well as for the beginner who needs some extra work in fundamental topics. Through written, aural, and keyboard skills, students gain knowledge of pitch notation, rhythm and meter, scales, intervals, chords, simple harmonic progressions, and cadences.

105. Topics in Music.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5, F9 (some sections.)

Topics courses are designed to focus on special interest topics such as Women in Music, Music of Africa, Memphis Music, Sacred Music Traditions, Music and Drama of Eighteenth Century England, and Understanding Jazz Language.

117. Music Cultures of the World.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5, F9.

This course serves as an introduction to the variety of music genres found in cultures around the world outside the Western art music tradition. Students will be introduced not only to different musical styles, but also to their aesthetic foundations, relation to social and cultural contexts, historical developments, and cross-cultural interactions and influences.

118. African-American Music.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5, F9.

This course is a survey of African American musical traditions from colonial times to the present. Students will examine the development of these styles, paying particular attention to the way in which they fused cultures from around the globe. The influence of the music in the United States and around the world will also be studied.

119. The Music of Latin America.

Fall. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5, F9.

This course is a survey of the variety of indigenous, folk, and art music of Latin America. Emphasis is on the sound of the music and on the cultural and social contexts of various cultures and the historical development of music in Latin America from the colonial period to the present.

140. Music and Healing.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

This course examines the history of music and healing and explores current applications of music to healing—inside and outside the professional medical community. The course will explore healing rituals and methodologies of primitive cultures, applications of music to healing through music therapy, the incorporation of music into so-called “new age” healing, and the new field of “Medical Ethnomusicology” that has emerged as a means to understand similarities between these seemingly disparate disciplines. It offers students opportunities to experience the powerful connections that exist between music and human physiology and psychology through class activities like drum circles, music and meditation, guided imagery and music, song writing, and group improvisation; as well as opportunities to see music as an agent of healing with daycare children at Hope House and the elderly at The Parkview. No prior technical knowledge of music or medicine is required or assumed for students taking this course.

145. Psychology of Music.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

This course is an introduction to the multidisciplinary study of music in the human experience. There will be a review and critical analysis of traditional and emerging issues in this rapidly evolving field. In addition to developing a musical vocabulary and critical listening skills, the course will address the questions of what is music and how the mind responds to musical stimuli through the confluence of various disciplines, including anthropology, biology, education, musicology, neuroscience, philosophy, physics, psychology, and sociology.

Note: Students who have had MUSC 204 or MUSC 205 should register for Music 305.

201. American Music: Twentieth-century American Music.

Learning Community first-year students only.

Fall. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F2-writing intensive, F5.

This course will focus on the development of critical thinking and writing skills through the study of the American culture and its effect on the music, composers, and entertainers of the twentieth century. The student will consider the influence of the culture on Twentieth-century American music by reading about, listening to, and discussing classical and popular American music. The music of the Memphis Region will be a focus and will require group excursions to musically important sites in the city of Memphis. Students will be expected to express their own views both about the music being studied and the larger question of the role of music and art in American society.

204. Theory and Musicianship I.

Fall. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

This course develops written, aural, and keyboard skills as applied to common-practice musical traditions. Beginning with a review of music fundamentals, topics include diatonic harmony and functions, voice leading guidelines, phrase structure, and introductions to musical style and species counterpoint.

Prerequisite: Music 103 or a satisfactory score on the music theory placement test.

205. Theory and Musicianship II.

Spring. Credits: 4.

This course further develops written, aural, and keyboard skills as applied to common-practice musical traditions. As a continuation of Music 204, topics include diatonic harmony and functions, an introduction to chromatic harmony, and small formal designs.

Prerequisite: Music 204 or a satisfactory score on the music theory placement test.

206. Theory and Musicianship III.

Fall. Credits: 4.

This is an advanced course in written, aural, and keyboard skills as applied to common-practice musical traditions. As a continuation of Music 205, topics include chromatic harmony, extended tertian harmony, larger formal designs, and nineteenth-century genres.

Prerequisite: Music 205.

222. Music Technology.

Fall. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

This course is designed as an introduction to both utilitarian and creative concepts, which will assist students in developing practical and artistic applications in music technology. The course will develop a solid foundation for those wishing to use technology to enhance their musical understanding.

227. European Musical Heritage I.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F3.

This course traces the development of Western musical style from the time of its earliest written records to 1750. This development will be placed in dialogue with materials from social and intellectual history, literature, and other arts.

228. European Musical Heritage II.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F3.

This course traces the development of Western musical style from 1750 to 1900. This development will be placed in dialogue with materials from social and intellectual history, literature, and other arts.

229. European Musical Heritage III.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F3.

This course traces the development of Western musical style from 1900 to today. This development will be placed in dialogue with materials from social and intellectual history, literature, and other arts.

305. Advanced Topics in Music.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 1-4.

Content of the course varies with instructor. Selected topics may include Form & Analysis, Advanced Analysis, Advanced Musicianship, Music Theory Pedagogy, Introduction to Musicology, among others. This course may be repeated for credit as long as topics covered are different.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

306. Mathematical Music Analysis: Post-Tonal Theory.

Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F6.

This course examines analytical and compositional techniques through a survey of twentieth and twenty-first-century repertoire. Topics include, but are not limited to, modulo 12, pitch centricity, symmetry, set theory, combinatorics, inversional and transpositional equivalence, and serialism.

Prerequisite: Music 206 or the permission of the instructor.

322. Advanced Music Technology.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

This course continues the trajectory begun in MUSC 222, providing a deeper palette of technological resources to convey musical ideas. Students explore theoretical concepts of sound design/synthesis and algorithmic composition, and investigate the components of real world sounds, learning object oriented programming skills necessary to replicate them. Students also explore live electronic improvisation with Ableton Live, and learn the techniques of loop-based composition and performance, as well as methods of remixing and resampling. This course will delve further into the recording and mixing techniques learned in MUSC 222. Students will learn specific strategies for recording different instruments and sonic environments, as well as further ways to add detail, clarity, and interest to their mixes. Basic concepts of mastering will be introduced.

345. Psychology of Music.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

This course is an introduction to the multidisciplinary study of music in the human experience. There will be a review and critical analysis of traditional and emerging issues in this rapidly evolving field. In addition to the further development of the musical vocabulary, critical listening skills and analytic skills, the course will address the questions of what is music and how the mind responds to musical stimuli through the confluence of various disciplines, including anthropology, biology, education, musicology, neuroscience, philosophy, physics, psychology, and sociology.

Prerequisite: MUSC 204 or MUSC 205.

414. Conducting I.

Fall. Credits: 2.

This course serves as an introduction to the fundamental skills of conducting. Seminar-style group lessons that emphasize reading, studying and communicating a score to an ensemble.

Prerequisite: Music major, minor or the permission of the instructor.

415. Conducting II.

Spring. Credits: 2.

The course serves to develop strategies for leading effective rehearsals. Students work regularly with the class ensemble to develop skills as a leader in rehearsal settings.

Prerequisite: MUSC 414.

460. Internship.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 1-4.

Degree Requirements: F11.

The internship program provides an experiential approach to the learning process and affords music students the opportunity to work in regional music organizations for academic credit (Memphis Opera, Memphis Symphony Orchestra, Church music programs, Memphis Playhouse, and the like). Internship placements are designed to complement learning goals and career plans by allowing the student to apply theoretical principles and skills learned in the traditional classroom. Placements are arranged by the Director of Career Services and work schedules are arranged by the student and on-site supervisor(s). Typically students work on specific projects related to their career interest and compatible with the goals and interests of the sponsoring organization. Other requirements of the internship include submission of a resume and application, interview with the on-site supervisor, participation in classroom seminars which focus on long-term career planning and job search skills, completion of written self-assessment assignments, and the like. Internships are available to second-semester junior and senior music majors with possible availability to majors from other departments. Arrangements for internships are made the semester prior to the actual experience. Under special circumstances, the number of credit hours may vary from 1-4, but under no circumstances will more than 8 credits be allowed to count toward the credits required for graduation.

Prerequisites: Courses appropriate to the specific internship experience.

485. Senior Seminar.

Fall. Credits: 2

This seminar provides a capstone experience for the Music Major through instruction in research and writing methods. This course will prepare the student for a public presentation in the spring semester (see Music 486.)

486. Senior Presentation. (in conjunction with 485)

Spring. Credits: 2

Each music major will design and present an appropriate portion of their senior research project in consultation with the music faculty, and will choose one of the following:

* A recital performance with program notes.

* A paper presentation based on original research.

* A performance of an original composition with program notes.

* A lecture-recital based on original research.

495-496. Honors Tutorial.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4-4.

APPLIED MUSIC

All applied music instruction is offered Fall and Spring semesters and meets the F5 requirements with four semesters of 1 credit each. Students enrolled in Applied Music will be charged an additional fee each semester for private lessons.*

  • 160. Piano/Classical
  • 160.2. Piano/Jazz
  • 161. Organ
  • 162. Harpsichord
  • 163. Voice
  • 164.1. Guitar/Classical
  • 164.2. Guitar/Commercial
  • 164.3. Guitar/Jazz
  • 165. Harp
  • 166. Violin
  • 167. Viola
  • 168. Cello
  • 169.1. Bass/Orchestral
  • 169.2. Bass/Jazz
  • 170. Flute
  • 171. Oboe
  • 172. Clarinet
  • 173. Bassoon
  • 174. French Horn
  • 175. Trumpet
  • 176. Trombone/Tuba
  • 177.1. Percussion/Orchestral
  • 177.2. Percussion/Jazz
  • 178. Saxophone
  • 179. Composition

* The Applied Music fee will be charged to each student every semester enrolled.

*APPLIED MUSIC FEES

Students enrolled in applied music will be charged a fee of $450.00 per credit for private lessons in every semester enrolled, unless one’s major or minor in music is officially declared. After the first applied music lesson, this applied lesson fee is nonrefundable.

Declared music majors are exempt from this fee for required lessons on their principal instrument (up to 8 credits total.)

Declared music minors are exempt from this fee for required lessons on their principal instrument (up to 4 credits total.)

All students will be charged the fee for those credits beyond required lessons, and applied lessons taken prior to declaration of the major and/or minor.

ENSEMBLES

Ensembles are offered both fall and spring semesters and meet the F5 requirements with four semesters of 1 credit each. It is expected that participation in large ensembles will relate to the principle instrument of applied study.

190. Rhodes Singers.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 1.

Degree Requirements: F5.

Rhodes Singers is an auditioned concert choir which appears regularly in concerts on and off campus. They perform repertoire from all stylistic periods, both a cappella and accompanied. This ensemble has a rich history of touring the United States for over sixty years, and frequently tours abroad. Students who participate in this ensemble are expected to commit to a full academic year.

191. Rhodes Orchestra.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 1.

Degree Requirements: F5.

This ensemble is a full symphonic orchestra that presents several concerts on and off campus during the academic year with repertoire ranging from the Baroque period to the 21st century. This ensemble is open to students with previous instrumental experience. Students do not need to be music majors or minors to participate; however, an audition for the music director is required. Rental instruments are available.

192. Rhodes MasterSingers Chorale.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 1.

Degree Requirements: F5.

This ensemble comprises experienced singers from the campus and Greater-Memphis community and students. There are up to four concerts each year and the repertoire includes a variety of musical styles. They frequently perform with the Memphis Symphony Orchestra. Membership is by audition.

193. Rhodes Women’s Chorus.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 1.

Degree Requirements: F5.

This ensemble is open to female students, and repertoire is taken from a variety of musical genres. The ensemble presents a major concert each semester and makes several program appearances in the local community. Membership is by audition.

194. Rhodes Jazz Ensemble.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 1.

Degree Requirements: F5.

This ensemble, the college’s big band, performs multiple times per semester on campus and around Memphis. Students explore literature from all historic periods of jazz with most concerts centering on a theme. Concepts such as improvisation, interpretation, and ensemble technique are studied and put into practice, and students have access to renowned jazz musicians through concerts and clinics. The ensemble is open to all singers and instrumentalists, pending an audition with the director.

195. Collaborative Piano.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 1.

Degree Requirements: F5.

Competent players may earn credit for studio and/or recital accompanying of vocalists and instrumentalists.

196 and 198. Selected Chamber Ensembles.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 1.

Degree Requirements: F5.

Chamber ensembles include but are not limited to Brass Quintet, Chamber Singers, Commercial Music Ensemble, Fanfare Trumpets, Flute Ensemble, Guitar Ensemble, Harp Ensemble, Jazz Combos, Piano Trio, String Quartet, Woodwind Quintet and World Drum Ensemble. All ensembles are auditioned and coached by music faculty who are professional musicians.

197. Rhodes Men’s Chorus

Fall, Spring. Credits: 1.

Degree Requirements: F5.

This vocal ensemble is open to all male students at Rhodes College. Repertoire is taken from a variety of musical genres appropriate for the male voice. The ensemble presents at least one major concert each semester, and performs on and off campus. Membership is by audition.

  • 160. Piano/Classical
  • 160.2. Piano/Jazz
  • 161. Organ
  • 162. Harpsichord
  • 163. Voice
  • 164.1. Guitar/Classical
  • 164.2. Guitar/Commercial
  • 164.3. Guitar/Jazz
  • 165. Harp
  • 166. Violin
  • 167. Viola
  • 168. Cello
  • 169.1. Bass/Orchestral
  • 169.2. Bass/Jazz
  • 170. Flute
  • 171. Oboe
  • 172. Clarinet
  • 173. Bassoon
  • 174. French Horn
  • 175. Trumpet
  • 176. Trombone/Tuba
  • 177.1. Percussion/Orchestral
  • 177.2. Percussion/Jazz
  • 178. Saxophone
  • 179. Composition




PLEASE NOTE: This document reflects information as it was published in the 2013-14 Rhodes Catalogue. You may find more current information elsewhere on rhodes.edu.