Interdisciplinary Study

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Interdisciplinary Programs

Interdisciplinary programs exist to provide an appropriate structure within which to offer study opportunities that do not fit within the bounds of existing departments, to bring together faculty and students from several disciplines to study areas of interest that cross traditional departmental lines and require an interdisciplinary approach, and to inform the campus community at large of the nature and importance of these areas.

Africana Studies
Archaeology
Asian Studies
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Environmental Sciences and Studies
Film Studies
Gender and Sexuality Studies
Latin American Studies
Neuroscience
Political Economy
Urban Studies
Interdisciplinary Majors
Self-Designed Interdisciplinary Majors
Humanities
Interdisciplinary Course Offerings

Africana Studies

Program Committee:
Charles McKinney, Department of History, Chair
Ernest Gibson, Department of English
Kendra Hotz, Department of Religious Studies
Luther Ivory, Department of Religious Studies
Susan Kus, Department of Anthropology/Sociology
Robert Saxe, Department of History, Associate Chair
Katheryn Wright, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures

Requirements for a Minor in Africana Studies

A total of twenty-four (24) credits as follows:

  1. History 242: African American History, or History 105: Selected Topics in African American History
  2. Five additional courses chosen from the following three categories. No more than three courses are to be chosen from either category A or B, one of which must be at the 300-level. Courses regularly offered include:
    1. Humanities and Fine Arts
      1. Art 265: Topics in Art History (when primary focus of course is related to Africana Studies)
      2. English 224: Introduction to African American Poetry in the United States
      3. English 265: Topics in English (when primary focus of course is related to Africana Studies)
      4. English 364: African American Literature
      5. English 375: Topics in Postcolonial Literature
      6. French 154: African Literatures of French Expression in Translation
      7. French 354: African Literatures in French
      8. History 105: Selected Topics in History (when primary focus of course is related to Africana Studies)
      9. History 205: Selected Topics in History (when topic is related to Africana studies)
      10. History 242: African American History
      11. History 243: The Civil Rights Movement
      12. History 247: The American South
      13. History 305: Selected Topics in History (when primary focus of course is related to Africana Studies)
      14. History 342: Slavery in the United States
      15. History 349: Black and White Women in the History of the South
      16. History 405: Topics in History (when topic is Africana studies)
      17. Music 105: Topics in Music (when primary focus of course is related to Africana Studies)
      18. Music 118: African American Music
      19. Philosophy 250: Topics in Philosophy (when topic is Africana studies)
      20. Philosophy 255: Philosophy of Race
      21. Religious Studies 232: Social Issues in Ethical and Religious Perspective (when primary focus of course is related to Africana Studies)
      22. Religious Studies 258: Topics in the History of Religions (when primary focus of course is related to Africana Studies)
      23. Religious Studies 259: Topics in the History of Christianity (when primary focus of course is related to Africana Studies)
      24. Religious Studies 451-452: Research in Religious Studies (when primary focus of course is related to Africana Studies)
    2. Social Sciences
      1. Anthropology/Sociology 211: Peoples of Sub-Sahara African and Madagascar
      2. Anthropology/Sociology 331: Race and Ethnicity in American Society
      3. Anthropology/Sociology 451/452: Research Seminar (when primary focus of course is related to Africana Studies)
      4. International Studies 251: Government and Politics of Africa
      5. International Studies 252: The Politics of African Unity
      6. International Studies 253: Ethnic Conflict in Africa
      7. International Studies 265: Topics in International Studies (when topic is Africana studies)
      8. Political Science 200: Urban Politics and Policy
      9. Political Science 230: Black Political Thought
      10. Psychology 105: Special Topics in Psychology (when topic is Africana studies)
      11. Psychology 408: Advanced Topics (when primary focus of course is related to Africana Studies)
    3. Internships (as approved by the departments and chair of the Africana Studies program committee) Students are strongly encouraged, but not required, to complete a semester-length internship at an approved site.
      1. Anthropology/Sociology 460
      2. History 360/461
      3. Music 460
      4. Political Science 460
      5. Psychology 460
      6. Urban Studies 460
      7. Religious Studies 460

Archaeology

Committee:
Dee Garceau, Department of History
David Jeter, Department of Chemistry
Kimberly Kasper, Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellow in Environmental Archaeology
Susan Kus, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
Jeanne Lopiparo, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
Milton Moreland, Department of Religious Studies, Chair
Kenny Morrell, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
Jon Russ, Department of Chemistry
Susan Satterfield, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
Francesca Tronchin, Department of Art

Requirements for a Minor in Archaeology

A total of twenty-four (24) credits as follows:

  1. Archaeology 210 or Anthropology 290: Learning from Things: Material Culture Studies.
  2. Archaeology 220 or Anthropology 254: Archaeological Methods.
  3. Three courses that deal with archaeological issues offered in various departments. At least two departments must be represented to satisfy this requirement. A list of current courses is available each semester. The following courses are representative offerings that satisfy this requirement.
    • Anthropology/Sociology 202: Understanding the Past: Archaeological Perspectives on Culture
    • Anthropology/Sociology 207: Archaeology of Sex and Gender
    • Anthropology/Sociology 221: North of the Rio Grande: Indigenous People of North America
    • Anthropology/Sociology 224: Latin America before 1492
    • Anthropology/Sociology 265: The Past, Present and Future of Southern Foodscapes
    • Anthropology/Sociology 271: Ecological Anthropology
    • Anthropology/Sociology 275: Food and Culture
    • Anthropology/Sociology 325: The Maya and Their World
    • Anthropology/Sociology 327: Gender and Power in Latin America
    • Art 265: Topics in Art (when subject matter pertains to Archaeology)
    • Art 318: Greek Art and Architecture
    • Art 319: Roman Art and Architecture
    • Art 320: Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt and the Near East
    • Chemistry 107: Chemistry and Archaeology
    • Chemistry 108: Chemistry and Art
    • Greek and Roman Studies 351: GIS and Mediterranean Archaeology
    • Religious Studies 260: Archaeology and the Biblical World
    • Religious Studies 286: Death and the Afterlife
  4. A choice of one course from the following three options.
    • Archaeology 120: Field Research in Environmental Archaeology
    • Archaeology 450: Archaeological Field School
    • Archaeology 460: Internship

Course Offerings

ARCE 120: Field Research in Environmental Archaeology

Summer, Credits: 4.

Degree Requirement: F7, F11.

This course and accompanying lab focus on a scientific understanding of the biological and geological methods and theories that are relevant to human/environmental interaction in pre-historic and historic sites of human occupation. Research questions to be discussed involve three major areas of study: 1) relationships between site formation processes, environmental change and human activity; 2) plant and animal domestication and exploitation; and 3) methods for dating artifacts. The class and lab are held in May and early June at the Ames Plantation in Tennessee. Enrollment is limited; students must apply for acceptance through the director of the Archaeology Program.

210. Learning from Things: Material Culture Studies.

Spring, Credits: 4.

While we are symbol users and inhabitants of imagined worlds, we are also tool makers whose hands are “dirtied” in manipulating the world. This course will focus attention on our “materiality” and our engagement with the material world. Examples of material culture studies will be drawn from such disciplines as archaeology, anthropology, geography, history, art history, folklore, popular culture, architecture, and museum studies. Material culture studies, while a rich source of information is also a challenging arena for the study of individuals, societies and cultures because objects neither “speak” unambiguously nor directly to us. Students will come to appreciate how astute observation underpinned by theoretical acumen and the clever framing of questions can allow us to “learn from things.” This course is cross-listed as Anthropology/Sociology 290.

220. Archaeological Methods.

Credits: 4.

This class will examine how we use archaeological materials to learn about past societies by studying the traces that their inhabitants left behind. Students will explore the range of methods used in the field, laboratory, and museum to find, record, date, preserve, contextualize, and interpret material culture. Basic methods of investigation and research will be discussed through the examination of site survey, excavation, and the analysis of artifacts. Students will be introduced to various systems of archaeological classification and analytical techniques for understanding objects such as lithic artifacts, pottery, human skeletal remains, and other historic and prehistoric artifacts. Artifact illustration, photography, cataloguing, and curating will also be discussed. This course is cross-listed as Anthropology/Sociology 254.

450. Archaeological Field School.

Summer, Credits: 4.

Degree Requirement: F11.

A supervised training course (ordinarily in the summer) in archeological methods at a controlled excavation. Students will live on the site and participate as crewmembers in the excavation, registration, restoration and publication of archaeological remains. Most students will participate in the Rhodes summer field school at the Ames Plantation, but alternative field schools in the USA or abroad are acceptable alternatives pending the approval of the chair of the Archaeology Program.

460. Internship.

Credits: 4.

A supervised learning experience involving archaeological and/or material culture studies out of state, abroad, or in the community outside of the college. This may include museums, laboratories, cultural resource management firms, cultural conservation projects, historical landmarks, surveying firms, etc. The student and the faculty advisor will devise the program of field work and submit it for approval to the chair of the Archaeology Program.

Asian Studies

Committee:
Chien-Kai Chen, Department of International Studies
Michael R. Drompp, Department of History, Dean of the Faculty
Li Han, Department of Modern Languages and Literature
John C. Kaltner, Department of Religious Studies
Seok-Won Lee, Department of History
David Mason, Department of Theatre
Mark W. Muesse, Department of Religious Studies, Chair
John E. Murray, Department of Economics
Chia-rong Wu, Department of Modern Languages and Literature
Lynn B. Zastoupil, Department of History

Requirements for a Minor in Asian Studies

A total of twenty (20) credits as follows:

  1. Asian Studies 150: Themes in Asian Studies
  2. Four additional courses (200-level or above) chosen from at least two different departments. One of these courses may take the form of a directed inquiry if approved by the Asian Studies Committee.

Courses currently being offered which meet this requirement are:

  • History

    History 105 Modern East Asian Revolutions
  • History 281: East Asia in the Modern World
  • History 282: Traditional China
  • History 283: Modern China
  • History 288: Japan Since 1800
  • History 293: Ancient and Medieval India
  • History 294: Modern India
  • History 391: Gandhi
  • History 481: Cold War in East Asia
  • International Studies

    International Studies 261: Government and Politics of China
  • International Studies 262: China’s Foreign Policy
  • International Studies 431-432: Topics in International Studies (when topic centers on Asia)
  • Modern Languages and Literatures

    Chinese 205: Modern Chinese Literature in English Translation
  • Chinese 210: Chinese Literary Heritage
  • Chinese 214: Introduction to Chinese Culture
  • Chinese 215: Images of Women in Chinese Literature and Film
  • Chinese 220: Contemporary Chinese Cinema
  • Religious Studies

    Religious Studies 255: Living Religions in Today’s World (when topic centers on Asia)
  • Religious Studies 258: Topics in the History of Religions (when topic centers on Asia)
  • Theatre

    Theatre 270: Introduction to Asian Theatre
  • Theatre 360: Introduction to Theatre in India

Course Offerings

150. Themes in Asian Studies.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

This introductory course examines the historical and cultural experiences of various peoples of Asia through a thematic approach. The course takes a comparative approach to a particular topic that reflects important forces that have had an impact throughout Asia. By examining a broad theme that has had resonance throughout Asia, the student will develop an appreciation for the complexity and diversity of Asian cultures while at the same time exploring common forces that have shaped those cultures. Such themes could include the development of Buddhism in Asia, comparative approaches to Asian theatre, and the history of Asian societies’ experiences with Western political and economic expansionism.

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Committee:
Terry Hill, Department of Biology
Loretta Jackson-Hayes, Department of Chemistry
Mary Miller, Department of Biology, Chair
Larryn Peterson, Department of Chemistry

Requirements for a Major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Leading to the B.S. Degree

Courses required for the BMB major that are appropriate for the fall semester of the first year include Chemistry 120-120L and Biology 130-131L. Students considering taking both Chemistry 120-120L and Biology 130-131L in the fall semester of the first year should consult a BMB advisor.

A total of fifty-three to fifty-six (53-56) credits as follows:

  1. Chemistry 120-120L (Foundations in Chemistry), 211, 212-212L (Organic Chemistry with laboratory), and 240-240L (Analytical Chemistry with laboratory)
  2. Biology 130-131L (Biology I with laboratory)
  3. Biology 325-325L (Molecular Biology with laboratory) and Biology 307(Cell Biology)
  4. Chemistry 414 (Biochemistry)
  5. BMB 310 (Methods in Biochemistry and Cell Biology)
  6. BMB 485 or 486 (Senior Seminar)
  7. Three of the following courses:
    • Biology 204-204L (Mechanisms of Development with laboratory)
    • Biology 301-301L (Microbiology with laboratory)
    • Biology 304-304L (Genetics with laboratory)
    • Biology 330 (Virology/Immunology)
    • Biology 380 (Topics in Biomedical Science)
    • Chemistry 311 (Physical Chemistry)
    • Chemistry 406 (Instrumental Analysis)
    • Chemistry 416 (Mechanism of Drug Action)
    • BMB 451 or 452 (Research with affiliated faculty - 4 credits only may satisfy one elective; must be approved by the BMB committee)

Any one of the following: Computer Science 141 (Programming Fundamentals) OR Math 121 (Calculus I) OR one course in probability and statistics. Courses that would be appropriate in the area of probability and statistics include Math111, Psychology 211, Economics 290.

For students seeking admission to graduate school, the following courses are recommended:

  • BMB 451 or 452
  • Biology 140-141L for programs in the biological sciences.
  • Chemistry 312-312L for programs in biochemistry.
  • Mathematics 121, 122
  • Physics 111-111L, 112-112L

For students seeking admission to programs in the health professions, please visit the Health Professions Website: http://www.rhodes.edu/academics/3981.asp.

Of the following courses: Cell Biology, Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Methods in Biochemistry and Cell Biology; no more than one may be transferred into Rhodes from another institution to satisfy the requirements for the BMB major. No more than one of the three required courses listed in item #7 above may be transferred into Rhodes from another institution to satisfy the requirements for the BMB major.

Students seeking a double major must have at least four upper level courses for the BMB major that are not used to satisfy requirements for the other major.

Honors in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

  1. Courses required: those listed for the B. S. degree in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology as well as the Honors Tutorial (BMB 495 and BMB 496).
  2. Permission of the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Program Committee.
  3. An original investigation of some problem in the area of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. This project is usually related to work being carried out by members of the faculty affiliated with the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Major. The project may also be carried out off campus, with the careful guidance of a BMB faculty member liaison for the project.
  4. A credible thesis must be presented at the end of the project. The honors project and thesis must be approved by the student’s honors committee, which should be comprised of at least three members of the faculty affiliated with the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Major.

Course Offerings

310. Methods in Biochemistry and Cell Biology.

Fall. Credits: 4.

This course provides instruction in the theory and application of a variety of research techniques dealing with the structure and function of proteins in biological systems. Students will gain practical laboratory experience in procedures including chromatographic separation of proteins, spectrophotometric protein assays, kinetic characterization of enzymes, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, antibody production, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), immunoblotting, and fluorescence microscopy. Additional experience will be gained in the practical application of computer-based bioinformatics tools for characterizing proteins based on their amino acid or gene sequences, as well as on mass-spectrometric analysis of peptide fragment fingerprints. This course can count as laboratory credit to accompany Biology 307 or Chemistry 414 or both. One hour of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week plus independent work.

Prerequisites: Chemistry 120-120L 211 and Biology 130-131L; or the permission of the instructor.

451-452. Research in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 1–4.

Qualified students may conduct original laboratory research in biochemistry and molecular biology. A student may use four credit hours of research to satisfy one of the upper level requirements in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Interested students should consult a Biochemistry and Molecular Biology committee member. Prerequisites: the permission of a sponsoring faculty member and the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology committee. At least three hours of lab work per week per credit, weekly conferences with faculty sponsor, written report at the end of the semester.

460. Internship.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 1-4.

The Internship Program is designed to introduce students to practical applications of their academic work. Students may work off campus under professional supervision in fields related to the biochemical and molecular biological sciences, such as in bioinformatics and biotechnology. Students will be required to integrate academic and work experiences in an oral and/or written report at the end of the internship. No more than 4 credits per semester for no more than two semesters. Pass/Fail credit only. This course does not satisfy an upper level course requirement for the major.

Prerequisites: Permission of the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Committee chair.

485-486. Senior Seminar.

Spring. Credits: 4.

All Biochemistry and Molecular Biology majors are required to enroll in Senior Seminar during one semester of their senior year. Senior Seminar is intended to be a broad, integrative experience in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, requiring both oral and written work.

Prerequisites: Completion of the required courses or the permission of the instructor.

495-496. Honors Tutorial.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4-8.

Open to candidates for honors in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Includes supervised honors research and instruction in an appropriate field of study. Prerequisites: Permission of the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Committee and Minimum GPA of 3.5.

Environmental Studies and Sciences

Committee:
Tait Keller, Department of History, Director
Erin Bodine, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science
Sarah Boyle, Department of Biology
Michael Collins, Department of Biology
Mary Doherty, Department of Biology
Eric Gottlieb, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science
Kyle Grady, Department of Philosophy
Jeffrey Jackson, Department of History
Kimberly Kasper, Department of Anthropology/Sociology
Scott Newstok, Department of English
Jon Russ, Department of Chemistry
Jennifer Dabbs Sciubba, Department of International Studies
David Shankman, Environmental Studies and Sciences Program

Policy on Advanced Placement Credit

Students who have received a 5 on the Advanced Placement Environmental Science examination may count that credit as one introductory Environmental Sciences elective course in the Environmental Studies and Sciences majors and minors.

Requirements for a Major in Environmental Studies

A total of fifty-two (52) credits and one additional environmental experience as follows:

  1. Four Introductory Courses:
    1. ENVS 150: Environment and Society.
    2. Two introductory Environmental Studies courses from the following list (these two courses may not also be used to fulfill Environmental Studies electives):
      1. ANSO 201: Human Evolution.
      2. HIST 207: Global Environmental History.
      3. INTS 340: Global Ecopolitics.
      4. PHIL 230: Environmental Philosophy.
    3. One introductory Environmental Sciences course from the following list (this course may not also be used to fulfill Environmental Sciences elective):
      1. BIOL 120: Introduction to Environmental Science.
      2. ENVS 111: Physical Geology.
      3. ENVS 116: Introductory Topics in Earth Science.
      4. ENVS 120: Introduction to Earth and Atmospheric Science.
      5. ENVS 170: Rocky Mountain Ecology Field Research. (at Teton Science Schools)
  2. ECON 100: Introduction to Economics.
  3. Four Environmental Studies electives from the following list; courses must come from at least two departments; additional courses may be designated by the Environmental Studies and Sciences program:
    1. ANSO 201: Human Evolution.
    2. ANSO 203: Becoming Human: Domesticating the World.
    3. ANSO 221: North of the Rio: Indigenous People of North America.
    4. ANSO 265: Selected Introductory Topics in Anthropology and Sociology. (i.e. Southern Foodscapes, or other environmentally-related topic approved by the director of the program)
    5. ANSO 271: Ecological Anthropology.
    6. ANSO 273: Gender and the Environment.
    7. ANSO 275: Food and Culture: You Are What You Eat.
    8. ART 166: Topics in Studio Art: Sculpture, Trees, and the Life of Wood
    9. CHIN 214: Intro to Chinese Culture: Material Culture and Chinese Gardens.
    10. ECON 349: Environmental and Natural Resource Economics.
    11. ECON 360: Urban Economics.
    12. ENGL 332: Advanced Shakespeare Studies: Green Shakespeare.
    13. ENGL 336: Literature & Landscape.
    14. ENVS 205: Topics in Environmental Studies. (when approved by the director of the program)
    15. FYWS 151: Overton: Memphis and the History of Urban Parks.
    16. HIST 105: Disease & Epidemics.
    17. HIST 207: Global Environmental History.
    18. HIST 305: U.S. Cities and Suburbs.
    19. HIST 307: Nature and War.
    20. HIST 309: Natural Disasters.
    21. HUM 201: Search for Values. (Jackson’s section only)
    22. INTS 340: Global Ecopolitics.
    23. INTS 341: Comparative Ecopolitics.
    24. INTS 375: Population and National Security.
    25. PHIL 230: Environmental Philosophy.
    26. POLS 206: Urban Politics and Policy.
    27. RELS 101: The Bible. (Hotz’s section only)
    28. RELS 220: Topics in Theology: Environmental Theology.
    29. URBN 201: Introduction to Urban Studies.
  4. Two additional Environmental Sciences courses from the following list; additional courses may be designated by the Environmental Studies and Sciences program:
    1. No Prerequisites:
      1. BIOL 120: Introduction to Environmental Science.
      2. CHEM 120(L): Foundations of Chemistry. (Environmentally-themed section preferred)
      3. ENVS 111: Physical Geology.
      4. ENVS 116: Introductory Topics in Earth Science.
      5. ENVS 120: Introduction to Earth and Atmospheric Science.
      6. ENVS 170: Rocky Mountain Ecology Field Research. (at Teton Science Schools)
      7. MATH 115: Applied Calculus.
      8. MATH 214: Discrete Mathematical Modeling with Biological Applications.
    2. Prerequisites: BIOL 120 or ENVS 120 and CHEM 120:
      1. ENVS 206(L): Topics in Environmental Sciences. (when approved by the director of the program)
      2. ENVS 220(L): Physical Geography of the Southeastern United States.
    3. Prerequisites: BIOL 120 and CHEM 120 or BIOL 130-131 and 140-14:
      1. BIOL 212 and 214 (taken together): Environmental Issues in Southern Africa and Environmental Field Study in Namibia.
      2. BIOL 315(L): Ecology.
      3. BIOL 320(L): Conservation Biology.
      4. BIOL 345(L): Ornithology.
      5. BIOL 365: Advanced Topics in Biology. (i.e. Plants and People, or other environmentally-related topic approved by the director of the program)
    4. Prerequisites: BIOL 130-131 and 140-141
      1. BIOL 200(L): Evolution.
      2. BIOL 201(L): Mycology.
      3. BIOL 202: Vertebrate Life.
      4. BIOL 207(L): Animal Behavior.
      5. BIOL 220: Parasitology.
      6. BIOL 253(L): Plant Genetics and Diversity.
      7. BIOL 301(L): Microbiology.
    5. Prerequisite: Chemistry 120
      1. CHEM 206: Environmental Chemistry.
      2. CHEM 211: Organic Chemistry I.
    6. Prerequisite: Chemistry 211
      1. CHEM 240(L): Analytical Chemistry.
  5. INTD 225: Geographic Information Systems.
  6. ENVS 486: Senior Seminar.
  7. Experiential Learning. Each student in the major will be required to complete an environmentally-oriented experience in which he or she will have a substantial engagement with environmental issues outside the Rhodes campus. There are several ways to complete this requirement, some of which are credit-bearing, but others are not. As with the College’s F11 requirement, students are not required to receive academic credit.
    1. Students may enroll in one of the following:
      • ARCE 120: Field Research in Environmental Archaeology.
      • ARCE 450: Archaeological Field School.
      • BIOL 212 and 214 (taken together): Environmental Issues in Southern Africa and Environmental Field Study in Namibia.
      • ENVS 160: Rocky Mountain Ecology. (at Teton Science Schools)
      • ENVS 170: Rocky Mountain Ecology Field Research. (at Teton Science Schools)
      • ENVS 450: Field Experience in Environmental Studies and Sciences.
      • ENVS 460: Internship in Environmental Studies and Sciences.
      • ENVS 490: Independent Research in Environmental Studies and Sciences.
    2. Experiences other than those listed above must be approved by the director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences Program and will require a substantial essay, evaluated by the director of the program, which links the student’s experience with what he or she has learned in the classroom. Experiences may include organized service projects at Rhodes with faculty or staff oversight (such as the Summer Service Fellowships), or study abroad experiences approved by Rhodes with significant environmental content as determined by the director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences program. Students should submit the form on the program’s website to petition for such experiences.

Requirements for a Major in Environmental Sciences

A total of fifty four to fifty six (54-56) hours and one additional environmental experience as follows:

  1. Four Introductory Courses:
    1. ENVS 150: Environment and Society.
    2. Three introductory courses from the following list:
      1. BIOL 120: Environmental Science.
      2. CHEM 120: Foundations of Chemistry. (environmentally-themed section preferred)
      3. ENVS 111: Physical Geology.
      4. ENVS 116: Introductory Topics in Earth Science.
      5. ENVS 120: Introduction to Earth and Atmospheric Science.
      6. ENVS 170: Rocky Mountain Field Research. (at Teton Science Schools)
      7. MATH 214: Discrete Mathematical Modeling with Biological Applications.
  2. One statistics course from the following list:
    1. ECON 290: Statistical Analysis for Economics and Business.
    2. MATH 111: Introduction to Applied Statistics.
    3. PSYC 211: Statistical Methods.
  3. Four upper-level Environmental Sciences electives. Three courses must contain a lab component. Courses must come from at least two departments. Additional courses may be designated by the Environmental Studies and Sciences program.
    1. Prerequisites: BIOL 120 or ENVS 120 and CHEM 120
      1. ENVS 206(L): Topics in Environmental Sciences. (when approved by the director of the program)
      2. ENVS 220(L): Physical Geography of the Southern United States.
    2. Prerequisites: BIOL 120 and CHEM 120 or BIOL 130-131 and 140-141
      1. BIOL 212 and 214 (taken together): Environmental Issues in Southern Africa and Environmental Field Study in Namibia.
      2. BIOL 315(L): Ecology.
      3. BIOL 320(L): Conservation Biology.
      4. BIOL 345(L): Ornithology.
      5. BIOL 365: Advanced Topics in Biology. (i.e. Plants and People, or other environmentally-related topic approved by the director of the program)
    3. Prerequisites: BIOL 130-131 and 140-141
      1. BIOL 200(L): Evolution.
      2. BIOL 201(L): Mycology.
      3. BIOL 202: Vertebrate Life.
      4. BIOL 207(L): Animal Behavior.
      5. BIOL 220: Parasitology.BIOL 253(L): Plant Genetics and Diversity.
      6. BIOL 301(L): Microbiology.
    4. Prerequisite: Chemistry 120
      1. CHEM 206: Environmental Chemistry.
      2. CHEM 211: Organic Chemistry I.
    5. Prerequisite: Chemistry 211
      1. CHEM 240(L): Analytical Chemistry.
      2. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
      3. ENVS 490: Independent Research.
  4. Two Environmental Studies electives from the following list:
    1. ANSO 201: Human Evolution.
    2. ANSO 203: Becoming Human: Domesticating the World.
    3. ANSO 221: North of the Rio: Indiginous People of North America.
    4. ANSO 265: Selected Introductory Topics in Anthropology and Sociology. (i.e. Southern Foodscapes, or other environmentally-related topic approved by the director of the program)
    5. ANSO 271: Ecological Anthropology.
    6. ANSO 273: Gender and the Environment.
    7. ANSO 275: Food and Culture: You Are What You Eat.
    8. ART 166: Topics in Studio Art: Sculpture, Trees, and the Life of Wood.
    9. CHIN 214: Topics in Chinese Culture: Material Culture and Chinese Gardens.
    10. ECON 349: Environmental and Natural Resource Economics.
    11. ECON 360: Urban Economics.
    12. ENGL 332: Advanced Shakespeare Studies: Green Shakespeare.
    13. ENGL 336: Literature & Landscape.
    14. ENVS 205: Topics in Environmental Studies. (when approved by the director of the program)
    15. FYWS 151: Overton: Memphis and the History of Urban Parks.
    16. HIST 105: Disease & Epidemics.
    17. HIST 207: Global Environmental History.
    18. HIST 305: U.S. Cities and Suburbs.
    19. HIST 307: Nature and War.
    20. HIST 309: Natural Disasters.
    21. HUM 201: Search for Values. (Jackson’s Section only)
    22. INTS 340: Global Ecopolitics.
    23. INTS 341: Comparative Ecopolitics.
    24. INTS 375: Population and National Security.
    25. PHIL 230: Environmental Philosophy.
    26. POLS 206: Urban Politics and Policy.
    27. RELS 101: The Bible. (Hotz’s Section only)
    28. RELS 220: Topics in Theology: Environmental Theology.
    29. URBN 201: Introduction to Urban Studies.
  5. INTD 225: Geographic Information Systems.
  6. ENVS 486: Senior Seminar.
  7. Experiential Learning. Each student in the major will be required to complete an environmentally-oriented experience in which he or she will have a substantial engagement with environmental issues outside the Rhodes campus. There are several ways to complete this requirement, some of which are credit-bearing, but others are not. As with the College’s F11 requirement, students are not required to receive academic credit.
    1. Students may enroll in one of the following:
      1. ARCE 120: Field Research in Environmental Archaeology.
      2. ARCE 450: Archaeological Field School.
      3. BIOL 212 and 214 (taken together): Environmental Issues in Southern Africa and Environmental Field Study in Namibia.
      4. ENVS 160: Rocky Mountain Ecology (at Teton Science Schools).
      5. ENVS 170: Rocky Mountain Field Research (at Teton Science Schools).
      6. ENVS 450: Field Experience in Environmental Studies and Sciences.
      7. ENVS 460: Internship in Environmental Studies and Sciences.
      8. ENVS 490: Independent Research in Environmental Studies and Sciences.
    2. Experiences other than those listed above must be approved by the director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences Program and will require a substantial essay, evaluated by the director of the program, which links the student’s experience with what he or she has learned in the classroom. Experiences may include organized service projects at Rhodes with faculty or staff oversight (such as the Summer Service Fellowships), or study abroad experiences approved by Rhodes with significant environmental content as determined by the director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences program. Students should submit the form on the program’s website to petition for such experiences.

Requirements for a Minor in Environmental Studies

A total of twenty-four (24) credits and one additional experiential environmental experience as follows:

  1. ENVS 150: Environment and Society.
  2. One introductory course from the following:
    1. ANSO 201: Human Evolution.
    2. HIST 207: Global Environmental History.
    3. INTS 340: Global Ecopolitics.
    4. PHIL 230: Environmental Philosophy.
  3. Three of the following Environmental Studies courses from at least two departments. Additional courses may be designated by the Environmental Studies and Sciences program.
    1. ANSO 201: Human Evolution.
    2. ANSO 203: Becoming Human: Domesticating the World.
    3. ANSO 221: North of the Rio: Indigenous People of North America.
    4. ANSO 265: Selected Introductory Topics in Anthropology and Sociology. (i.e. Southern Foodscapes, or other environmentally-related topic approved by the director of the program)
    5. ANSO 271: Ecological Anthropology.
    6. ANSO 273: Gender and the Environment.
    7. ANSO 275: Food and Culture: You Are What You Eat.
    8. ART 166: Topics in Studio Art: Sculpture, Trees, and the Life of Wood
    9. CHIN 214: Intro to Chinese Culture: Material Culture and Chinese Gardens.
    10. ECON 349: Environmental and Natural Resource Economics.
    11. ECON 360: Urban Economics.
    12. ENGL 332: Advanced Shakespeare Studies: Green Shakespeare.
    13. ENGL 336: Literature & Landscape.
    14. ENVS 205: Topics in Environmental Studies. (when approved by the director of the program)
    15. FYWS 151: Overton: Memphis and the History of Urban Parks.
    16. HIST 105: Disease & Epidemics.
    17. HIST 207: Global Environmental History.
    18. HIST 305: U.S. Cities and Suburbs.
    19. HIST 307: Nature and War.
    20. HIST 309: Natural Disasters.
    21. HUM 201: Search for Values. (Jackson’s section only)
    22. INTS 340: Global Ecopolitics.
    23. INTS 341: Comparative Ecopolitics.
    24. INTS 375: Population and National Security.
    25. PHIL 230: Environmental Philosophy.
    26. POLS 206: Urban Politics and Policy.
    27. RELS 101: The Bible. (Hotz’s section only)
    28. RELS 220: Topics in Theology: Environmental Theology.
    29. URBN 201: Introduction to Urban Studies.
  4. One Environmental Sciences course from the following list. Additional courses may be designated by the Environmental Studies and Sciences program.
    1. No Prerequisites:
      1. BIOL 120: Introduction to Environmental Science.
      2. CHEM 120(L): Foundations of Chemistry. (Environmentally-themed section preferred)
      3. ENVS 111: Physical Geology.
      4. ENVS 116: Introductory Topics in Earth Science.
      5. ENVS 120: Introduction to Earth and Atmospheric Science.
      6. ENVS 170: Rocky Mountain Ecology Field Research. (at Teton Science Schools)
      7. MATH 115: Applied Calculus.
      8. MATH 214: Discrete Mathematical Modeling with Biological Applications.
    2. Prerequisites: BIOL 120 or ENVS 120 and CHEM 120:
      1. ENVS 206(L): Topics in Environmental Sciences. (when approved by the director of the program)
      2. ENVS 220(L): Physical Geography of the Southeastern United States.
    3. Prerequisites: BIOL 120 and CHEM 120 or BIOL 130-131 and 140-141:
      1. BIOL 212 and 214 (taken together): Environmental Issues in Southern Africa and Environmental Field Study in Namibia.
      2. BIOL 315(L): Ecology.
      3. BIOL 320(L): Conservation Biology.
      4. BIOL 345(L): Ornithology.
      5. BIOL 365: Advanced Topics in Biology. (i.e. Plants and People, or other environmentally-related topic approved by the director of the program)
    4. Prerequisites: BIOL 130-131 and 140-141
      1. BIOL 200(L): Evolution.
      2. BIOL 201(L): Mycology.
      3. BIOL 202: Vertebrate Life.
      4. BIOL 207(L): Animal Behavior.
      5. BIOL 220: Parasitology.
      6. BIOL 253(L): Plant Genetics and Diversity.
      7. BIOL 301(L): Microbiology.
    5. Prerequisite: Chemistry 120
      1. CHEM 206: Environmental Chemistry.
      2. CHEM 211: Organic Chemistry I.
    6. Prerequisite: Chemistry 211
      1. CHEM 240(L): Analytical Chemistry.
  5. Experiential Learning. Each student in the minor will be required to complete an environmentally-oriented experience in which he or she will have a substantial engagement with environmental issues outside the Rhodes campus. There are several ways to complete this requirement, some of which are credit-bearing, but others are not. As with the College’s F11 requirement, students are not required to receive academic credit.
    1. Students may enroll in one of the following:
      1. ARCE 120: Field Research in Environmental Archaeology.
      2. ARCE 450: Archaeological Field School.
      3. BIOL 212 and 214 (taken together): Environmental Issues in Southern Africa and Environmental Field Study in Namibia.
      4. ENVS 160: Rocky Mountain Ecology. (at Teton Science Schools)
      5. ENVS 170: Rocky Mountain Field Research. (at Teton Science Schools)
      6. ENVS 450: Field Experience in Environmental Studies and Sciences.
      7. ENVS 460: Internship in Environmental Studies and Sciences.
      8. ENVS 490: Independent Research in Environmental Studies and Sciences.
    2. Experiences other than those listed above must be approved by the director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences Program and will require a substantial essay, evaluated by the director of the program, which links the student’s experience with what he or she has learned in the classroom. Experiences may include organized service projects at Rhodes with faculty or staff oversight (such as the Summer Service Fellowships), or study abroad experiences approved by Rhodes with significant environmental content as determined by the director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences program. Students should submit the form on the program’s website to petition for such experiences.

N.B.: Although not required, INTD 225: Geographic Information Systems, is strongly recommended.

Requirements for a Minor in Environmental Sciences

A total of twenty-four (24) credits and one additional environmental experience as follows:

  1. ENVS 150: Environment and Society.
  2. One of the following introductory courses in Environmental Sciences:
    1. BIOL 120: Environmental Science.
    2. CHEM 120(L): Foundations of Chemistry.
    3. ENVS 111: Physical Geology.
    4. ENVS 116: Introductory Topics in Earth Science.
    5. ENVS 120: Introduction to Earth and Atmospheric Science.
    6. MATH 115: Applied Calculus.
    7. MATH 214: Discrete Mathematical Modeling with Biological Applications.
  3. Three of the following Environmental Sciences courses from the following list. At least one must be taken from outside student’s major department. Additional courses may be designated by the Environmental Studies and Sciences program.
    1. No Prerequisites:
      1. BIOL 120: Introduction to Environmental Science.
      2. CHEM 120(L): Foundations of Chemistry. (Environmentally-themed section preferred)
      3. ENVS 111: Physical Geology.
      4. ENVS 116: Introductory Topics in Earth Science.
      5. ENVS 120: Introduction to Earth and Atmospheric Science.
      6. ENVS 170: Rocky Mountain Ecology Field Research. (at Teton Science Schools)
      7. MATH 115: Applied Calculus.
      8. MATH 214: Discrete Mathematical Modeling with Biological Applications.
    2. Prerequisites: BIOL 120 or ENVS 120 and CHEM 120:
      1. ENVS 206(L): Topics in Environmental Sciences. (when approved by the director of the program)
      2. ENVS 220(L): Physical Geography of the Southeastern United States.
    3. Prerequisites: BIOL 120 and CHEM 120 or BIOL 130-131 and 140-14:
      1. BIOL 212 and 214 (taken together): Environmental Issues in Southern Africa and Environmental Field Study in Namibia.
      2. BIOL 315(L): Ecology.
      3. BIOL 320(L): Conservation Biology.
      4. BIOL 345(L): Ornithology.
      5. BIOL 365: Advanced Topics in Biology. (i.e. Plants and People, or other environmentally-related topic approved by the director of the program)
    4. Prerequisites: BIOL 130-131 and 140-141
      1. BIOL 200(L): Evolution.
      2. BIOL 201(L): Mycology.
      3. BIOL 202: Vertebrate Life.
      4. BIOL 207(L): Animal Behavior.
      5. BIOL 220: Parasitology.
      6. BIOL 253(L): Plant Genetics and Diversity.
      7. BIOL 301(L): Microbiology.Prerequisite: Chemistry 120
      8. CHEM 206: Environmental Chemistry.
      9. CHEM 211: Organic Chemistry I.
    5. Prerequisite: Chemistry 211
      1. CHEM 240(L): Analytical Chemistry.
  4. One additional Environmental Studies elective from the following list. Additional courses may be designated by the Environmental Studies and Sciences program.
    1. ANSO 201: Human Evolution.
    2. ANSO 203: Becoming Human: Domesticating the World.
    3. ANSO 221: North of the Rio: Indigenous People of North America.
    4. ANSO 265: Selected Introductory Topics in Anthropology and Sociology. (i.e. Southern Foodscapes, or other environmentally- related topic approved by the director of the program)
    5. ANSO 271: Ecological Anthropology.
    6. ANSO 273: Gender and the Environment.
    7. ANSO 275: Food and Culture: You Are What You Eat.
    8. ART 166: Topics in Studio Art: Sculpture, Trees, and the Life of Wood
    9. CHIN 214: Intro to Chinese Culture: Material Culture and Chinese Gardens.
    10. ECON 349: Environmental and Natural Resource Economics.
    11. ECON 360: Urban Economics.
    12. ENGL 332: Advanced Shakespeare Studies: Green Shakespeare.
    13. ENGL 336: Literature & Landscape.
    14. ENVS 205: Topics in Environmental Studies. (when approved by the director of the program)
    15. FYWS 151: Overton: Memphis and the History of Urban Parks.
    16. HIST 105: Disease & Epidemics.
    17. HIST 207: Global Environmental History.
    18. HIST 305: U.S. Cities and Suburbs.
    19. HIST 307: Nature and War.
    20. HIST 309: Natural Disasters.
    21. HUM 201: Search for Values. (Jackson’s section only)
    22. INTS 340: Global Ecopolitics.
    23. INTS 341: Comparative Ecopolitics.
    24. INTS 375: Population and National Security.
    25. PHIL 230: Environmental Philosophy.
    26. POLS 206: Urban Politics and Policy.
    27. RELS 101: The Bible. (Hotz’s section only)
    28. RELS 220: Topics in Theology: Environmental Theology.
    29. URBN 201: Introduction to Urban Studies.
  5. Experiential Learning. Each student in the major will be required to complete an environmentally-oriented experience in which he or she will have a substantial engagement with environmental issues outside the Rhodes campus. There are several ways to complete this requirement, some of which are credit-bearing, but others are not. As with the College’s F11 requirement, students are not required to receive academic credit.
    1. Students may enroll in one of the following:
      1. ARCE 120: Field Research in Environmental Archaeology.
      2. BIOL 212 and 214 (taken together): Environmental Issues in Southern Africa and Environmental Field Study in Namibia.
      3. ARCE 450: Archaeological Field School.
      4. ENVS 160: Rocky Mountain Ecology. (at Teton Science Schools)
      5. ENVS 170: Rocky Mountain Field Research. (at Teton Science Schools)
      6. ENVS 450: Field Experience in Environmental Studies and Sciences.
      7. ENVS 460: Internship in Environmental Studies and Sciences.
      8. ENVS 490: Independent Research in Environmental Studies and Sciences.
    2. Experiences other than those listed above must be approved by the director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences Program and will require a substantial essay, evaluated by the director of the program, which links the student’s experience with what he or she has learned in the classroom. Experiences may include organized service projects at Rhodes with faculty or staff oversight (such as the Summer Service Fellowships), or study abroad experiences approved by Rhodes with significant environmental content as determined by the director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences program. Students should submit the form on the program’s website to petition for such experiences.

N.B.: Although not required, INTD 225: Geographic Information Systems, is strongly recommended.

Course Offerings

111. Physical Geology.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4

Degree Requirements: F7

Introduction to the composition and structure of the earth and processes that create modern landscapes. Topics include plate tectonics, the formation of minerals and rocks, weathering, erosion, and crustal deformation. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week, plus optional week-end field trips.

116. Introductory Topics in Earth Science.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4

This course offers students an introduction to various topics in the field of earth sciences. Varies with instructor.

120. Introduction to Earth and Atmospheric Science.

Fall. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F7.

This course provides an introduction to the Earth’s physical landscape including climate, landforms, and vegetation, and the processes that link them. The first section of the course examines atmospheric processes and the distribution and characteristics of the Earth’s climatic regions. The second section of the course focuses on processes at or near the Earth’s surface and gives special attention to volcanic and tectonic landforms; weathering and erosion; fluvial, aeolian and glacial processes; and the landforms they produce. The main objective of the course is for students to gain a basic understanding of the interaction between climate and the physical and biological systems at the earth’s surface.

150. Environment and Society.

Fall. Credits: 4.

This course is an introduction to contemporary environmental issues. Topics may include over-population pressures, climate change, energy consumption, water availability, biological diversity decline, sustainability practices, agricultural land-use, and global environmental governance, among other major global environmental challenges. Faculty from the natural sciences and humanities/social sciences in the Environmental Studies and Sciences program sometimes team-teach this course. Using an interdisciplinary approach, students will learn the science behind these issues, as well as the economic, political and cultural factors that influence environmental change and shape our responses to it. This course is required for both the Environmental Studies and Environmental Sciences majors and minors.

160. Rocky Mountain Ecology.

Maymester. Credits: 2.

Degree Requirements: F11.

This field course, taught by faculty at the Teton Science Schools in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, is focused on community ecology of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE). Ecology topics include: regional geology, influence of topography and climate on vegetation; community interaction of plants and animals including herbivory; predation and competition, community dynamics, succession, disturbance, identification of plants, insects and birds. The course will also familiarize students with basic field data collection and research techniques. The course will connect students with the other programming areas of Teton Science Schools as well as other professionals in the environmental science field in the context of professional opportunities after college. This course fulfills the Environmental Experience required for Environmental Studies and Sciences majors and minors. Requires separate application process and payment of additional tuition.

170. Rocky Mountain Field Research

Maymester. Credits: 4

Degree Requirements: F7 and F11

This field course, taught by faculty at the Teton Science Schools in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, is focused on community ecology of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE). This course also contains a substantial research component in which students will participate in a long-standing TSS program in order to develop skills in research design and data collection. Then students will create and complete their own research projects. The course will connect students with the other programming areas of Teton Science Schools as well as other professionals in the environmental science field in the context of professional opportunities after college. This course fulfills the Environmental Experience required for Environmental Studies and Sciences majors and minors. Requires separate application process and payment of additional tuition.

205. Selected Topics in Environmental Studies.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Introduction to selected topics in Environmental Studies. Topics vary with instructor. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Not offered every year.

206, 206L. Selected Topics in Environmental Sciences.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4 or 4, 1.

Introduction to selected topics in Environmental Sciences. Topics vary with instructor. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Course offering may or may not have a laboratory credit associated with the class. Not offered every year. Course may include the equivalent of 3 hours of laboratory each week.

Prerequisites: BIOL 120 or ENVS 120 and CHEM 120 or permission of instructor.

220. Physical Geography of the Southeastern United States.

Spring, Credits: 4

This course examines the physical landscapes in the southeastern United States. This is the non-glaciated, humid-subtropical region of eastern North America that includes the southern Appalachian Mountains, Coastal Plain, Interior Low Plateaus, and the Ozark and Ouachita Mountains. The primary focus is on the geological setting, geomorphic features, climate, soils, and vegetation. Students will examine the interrelationships of these factors in addition to human activities that shape the landscape.

Prerequisites: BIOL 120 or ENVS 120 and CHEM 120 or permission of instructor.

450. Field Experience in Environmental Studies and Sciences

Fall or Spring. Credits: 1-4.

Students may take part in independent field work under a faculty member’s supervision. Must be approved by the director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences program. With approval, this course will fulfill the Environmental Experience required for Environmental Studies and Sciences majors and minors.

460. Internship.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F11.

The Environmental Studies and Sciences internship enables students to make connections between what they have learned in the classroom and the world around them by applying their knowledge to real-world settings. Interns can work with a variety of local environmental agencies or organizations. Students must be approved by the Office of Career Services and have the permission of the Director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences program. This course fulfills the Environmental Experience required for Environmental Studies and Sciences minors.

490. Independent Research in Environmental Studies and Sciences

Fall or Spring. Credits: 1-4.

Students may take part in independent research under a faculty member’s supervision. Must be approved by the director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences program.

486. Senior Seminar

Spring. Credits: 4.

This senior capstone experience allows Environmental Studies and Environmental Sciences majors to make interdisciplinary connections between topics and themes which they have studied throughout their coursework. Assignments may include substantial reading, research projects, and oral presentations.

Film Studies

Committee:
Elizabeth Daggett, Department of Art
Michelle Mattson, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
Valeria Z. Nollan, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
Rashna Wadia Richards, Department of English, Chair

Requirements for a Minor in Film Studies

A total of twenty (20) credits as follows:

  1. English 202: Introduction to Cinema
  2. English 382: Film Theory
  3. Three courses to be chosen from a list of offerings in various departments. One of these requirements may be satisfied by a directed inquiry or an internship (on approval of the Film Minor Committee). Courses regularly offered include:
    1. Art 114: Digital Art
    2. Art 213: Digital Art: Intermediate Projects
    3. Art 313: Digital Art: Advanced Projects
    4. Chinese 220: Contemporary Chinese Cinema
    5. English 190: Shakespeare on Screen
    6. English 204: Introduction to Screenwriting
    7. English 241: History and Criticism of American Cinema
    8. English 242: World Film
    9. English 245: Special Topics in Film
    10. English 381: Advanced Topics in Film
    11. French 334: French and Francophone Cinema
    12. German 240/340: German Cinema
    13. History 105: British Empire through Film
    14. History 105: History of Latin America through Film
    15. Russian 400: Russian Film

Gender and Sexuality Studies

Affiliated Faculty:
Mark Behr, Department of English
Elizabeth Bridges, Department of Modern Languages
Kathleen Doyle, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
Angela Frederick, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
Dee Garceau-Hagen, Department of History
Rhiannon Graybill, Department of Religious Studies
Judith Haas, Department of English, Chair
Li Han, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
Leigh Johnson, Department of Philosophy
Kimberly Kasper, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
Mona Kreitner, Department of Music
Susan Kus, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
Jeanne Lopiparo, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
Laura Loth, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
Shira Malkin, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
Michelle Mattson, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
David McCarthy, Department of Art
Gail Murray, Department of History
Valeria Z. Nollan, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
Evie Perry, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
Leslie Petty, Department of English
Rashna Richards, Department of English
Amy Risley, Department of International Studies
Vanessa Rogers, Department of Music
Marsha Walton, Department of Psychology

Requirements for a Minor in Gender and Sexuality Studies

A total of twenty-four (24) credits as follows:

  1. Gender and Sexuality Studies 200. Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies.
  2. Gender and Sexuality Studies 400. Feminist and Queer Theory.
  3. Four courses selected from the Gender and Sexuality Studies curriculum.

Two of these courses must come from fields outside of one’s major. For one of these four courses, students are encouraged to consider an Internship or a Directed Inquiry. In order to receive academic credit for either the Internship or the Directed Inquiry, students must write a proposal, in consultation with a faculty mentor and submit the proposal for approval by the director of Gender and Sexuality Studies.

  • Gender and Sexuality Studies courses regularly offered include, but are not limited to:
  • Anthropology/Sociology 207: Women in Prehistory
  • Anthropology/Sociology 231: Gender and Society
  • English 225: Region, Race, Gender and Class in Southern Literature
  • English 380: Queer Theory and Literature
  • French 323: Travel, Gender, and Identity
  • History 349: Black and White Women in the South
  • History 445: Gender in the American West
  • International Studies 432: Women in World Politics
  • Music 105: Women in Music
  • Psychology 232: Psychology of Gender and Sexuality
  • Religious Studies 301: Gender and Sexuality in the Hebrew Bible
  • Spanish 350: Short Fiction by Spanish Women Writers

Course Offerings

200. Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

An interdisciplinary course designed primarily for first and second year students. This course explores the construction of gendered ideologies from a variety of disciplinary perspectives.

400. Feminist and Queer Theory.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

An interdisciplinary seminar in contemporary feminist and queer thought for advanced students. Students will examine the contributions of feminist scholars in fields including political theory, literary criticism, psychology, anthropology, sociology, and philosophy. Junior or senior standing recommended. Prerequisite: GSST 200 or the permission of the instructor.

460. Internship.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 1-4

Degree Requirements: F11.

A directed internship in which students integrate their academic study of gender or sexuality issues with practical experience in off-campus organizations, agencies, or businesses. To be eligible, students must have a G.P.A. of 2.5 or higher.

Pass/Fail only.

Latin American Studies

Committee:
Amy Risley, Department of International Studies, Chair
Eric Henager, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
David Jilg, Department of Theatre
Michael LaRosa, Department of History
Jeanne Lopiparo, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
Laura Luque de Johnson, Department of Biology
Elizabeth Pettinaroli, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
Alberto del Pozo Martinez, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures

Requirements for a Major in Latin American Studies

A total of forty-two to forty-four (42-44) credits as follows:

  1. Latin American Studies 200: Introduction to Latin American Studies.
  2. Latin American Studies 485: Senior Seminar.
  3. Nine of the following courses from at least four different departments. No more than three courses in any one department may count toward the major:
    1. Anthropology/Sociology 224: Latin America Before 1492.
    2. Anthropology/Sociology 325: The Maya and Their World.
    3. Anthropology/Sociology 327: Gender and Power in Latin America.
    4. Anthropology/Sociology 365: Cultural Motifs. (when the topic focuses on Latin America)
    5. Anthropology/Sociology 379: Anthropology of Social Change. (when the topic focuses on Latin America)
    6. Biology 160: An International Experience in Health Care.
    7. Economics 100: Introduction to Economics.
    8. History 261: Colonial Latin America.
    9. History 262: Modern Latin America.
    10. History 363: History of US-Latin American Relations.
    11. International Studies 200: Introduction to Comparative Politics.
    12. International Studies 265: Topics in International Studies. (when the topic focuses on Latin America)
    13. International Studies 266: Topics in International Studies. (when the topic focuses on Latin America)
    14. International Studies 273: Government and Politics of Latin America.
    15. International Studies 274: Issues in US-Latin American Relations.
    16. International Studies 310: Comparative Political Economy.
    17. International Studies 311: International Political Economy.
    18. Latin American Studies 460. (4 credits)
    19. Spanish 306: Introduction to Latin American Cultures and Literatures.*
    20. Spanish 309: Spanish in Latin America.
    21. Spanish 310: US-Latino Literatures and Cultures.
    22. Spanish 320: Spanish American Drama.
    23. Spanish 330: Spanish American Poetry.
    24. Spanish 340: Colonial and Global Visions in Spanish American Literatures.
    25. Spanish 360: Gender in Spanish American Literature.
    26. Spanish 365: Special Topics in Spanish. (when the topic focuses on Latin America)
    27. Spanish 370: Contemporary Southern Cone Literature.
    28. Spanish 405: Literature of Mexico after 1911.
    29. Spanish 406: Contemporary Novel of Spanish America.
    30. Spanish 408: Spanish American Short Story.
    31. Spanish 426: Imperial Discourses of the Hispanic World.

Requirements for a Minor in Latin American Studies

A total of twenty-two to twenty-four (22-24) credits as follows:

  1. Latin American Studies 200.
  2. Five of the following courses from at least four different departments
    (Latin American Studies 460 does not count toward the four-department
    distribution.)
    1. Anthropology/Sociology 224.
    2. Anthropology/Sociology 325.
    3. Anthropology/Sociology 379. 
    4. Biology 160.
    5. History 261.
    6. History 262.
    7. International Studies 200.
    8. International Studies 273.
    9. International Studies 274.
    10. Latin American Studies 460.
    11. Spanish 306.*

*Notes: prerequisite for Spanish 306: course or courses required to achieve skill competency for literature courses, usually Spanish 202 and 301 or 302.

Honors in Latin American Studies

  1. Completion of all requirements for the Latin American Studies major.
  2. Completion of Latin American Studies 495-496.
  3. Completion and public presentation of a substantial research project.

Project proposal must be approved by the Latin American Studies Committee by April of the junior year.

Course Offerings

200. Introduction to Latin American Studies.

Fall. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F9.

An introduction to the diverse cultural, social, and political realities of Latin America and the Caribbean. The region is examined from an interdisciplinary perspective that draws on the fields of literature, anthropology, sociology, history, and international studies. Major topics covered in the course include gender, ethnicity, religion, magical realism, immigration, revolution, dictatorship, and human rights. The course is intended as a broad overview of Latin American studies.

460. Latin American Studies Internship.

Fall, Spring. Credit: 1-4.

Degree Requirements: F11.

A work experience at one of several local non-profit organizations and other entities whose missions intersect with the Latin American Studies curriculum. Prior to enrolling in the course, students should research placement options with Career Services and Latin American Studies faculty. The course is conducted under the joint supervision of a Latin American Studies faculty member and a representative of the partner organization. Students who enroll in the course for less than four credits may repeat the course for up to four total credits.

485. Senior Seminar.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Senior Seminar is an interdisciplinary research project from the following departments: Anthropology/Sociology; History; International Studies; Modern Languages and Literatures (Spanish), Theatre, Biology. Students must combine two disciplines in their research and work under the supervision of faculty members of the Latin American Studies Committee.

495-496. Honors Tutorial.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4-8, 4-8.

Neuroscience

Committee:
Mauricio Cafiero, Department of Chemistry
Kelly Dougherty, Department of Biology
Kim Gerecke, Department of Psychology, Chair
Jason Haberman, Department of Psychology
David Kabelik, Department of Biology
Rebecca Klatzkin, Department of Psychology
Katie White, Department of Psychology

Requirements for a Major in Neuroscience Leading to the B.S. Degree

A total of fifty-three to fifty-six (53-56) credits as follows:

  1. Eight (8) core requirements:
    1. Chemistry 120-120L
    2. Biology 130-131L
    3. Biology 140-141L
    4. Psychology 150
    5. Psychology 211
    6. Neuroscience 270
    7. Neuroscience 350
    8. Neuroscience 485/486
  2. Two (2) depth requirements:
    1. Biology 375 or Biology 376; AND either Neuroscience 318 or Psychology 345
  3. Three (3) breadth courses from the following:
    1. Biology 204, 207, 303 or 304+304L, 307, 325, 340
    2. Chemistry 414, 416
    3. Neuroscience 451-452 (4 credits total)
    4. Psychology 216, 220, 224, 306, 327, 353
    5. Philosophy 328
  4. A third depth course
  5. Courses recommended but not required:
    1. Chemistry 211-212
    2. Computer Science 141
    3. Mathematics 115
    4. Physics 111-112 (with laboratory)
    5. Political Science 216

Honors in Neuroscience

In addition to maintaining a cumulative and major GPA of at least 3.5, honors candidates are required to enroll in Neuroscience 399 in the Spring of their junior year. By the start of the senior year, the candidate must submit a proposal for an independent research project for approval by the Program Committee. Up to 8 credits of Neuroscience 495-496 are taken each semester of the senior year. In addition to submitting a written report, the candidate is required to make an oral presentation at the conclusion of the research project. The honors degree in Neuroscience is contingent upon committee acceptance of the research manuscript.

COURSE OFFERINGS

270. Neuroscience.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.

This course examines the structure and function of the nervous system. Topics range from communication within individual neurons to higher order brain functions such as learning, memory, perception, states of consciousness, language and the regulation of motivation and emotion. Psychiatric and neurological disorders will also be discussed. Particular attention will be given to methods and research design in the Neurosciences.

Prerequisites: Biology 130 and 140, or Psychology 150.

318. Neuroscience of Brain Disorders.

Spring. Credits: 4.

Human brain dysfunction can produce a wide variety of neurological and psychiatric illnesses. While there have been many advances in understanding the underlying mechanisms of these disorders there are few preventative or therapeutic interventions, making these disorders among the most important health problems in our society. This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the neuroscientific literature that addresses the causes and treatments of several brain disorders at the cellular, molecular and genetic levels.  

Prerequisites: Neuroscience 270.  

350. Neuroscience Research Methods.

Spring. Credits: 4.

This laboratory methods course is designed to expose students to a wide range of neuroscience techniques including electrophysiology, stereotaxic surgery, behavioral pharmacology, tissue fixation and sectioning, histology, immunohistochemistry, western blotting, blood and salivary hormone analysis, and various psychophysiological measures. The class will comprise short lectures accompanying longer laboratory exercises.

Prerequisites: Neuroscience 270.  

399. Junior Honors Tutorial.

Spring. Credits: 1.

Junior Neuroscience majors who are considering pursuing honors research are required to enroll in this preparatory tutorial.

Prerequisite: Permission of the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the honors candidate’s research.

451-452. Research in Neuroscience.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 1–4.

Qualified students may conduct laboratory research in neuroscience. Four credits of research may be used to satisfy one of the three breadth requirements for the Neuroscience Major. Requirements include at least three hours of work per week per credit, regular meetings with the faculty sponsor, and a formal presentation of the research product upon completion. Interested students should consult the Neuroscience Program committee.

Prerequisite: Permission of the sponsoring faculty member and the Neuroscience Committee.

485-486. Senior Seminar.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.

All Neuroscience majors are required to enroll in Senior Seminar during one semester of their senior year. Senior Seminar is intended to be a capstone academic experience that involves student presentations and discussions of current primary literature in Neuroscience. Students will also prepare a research paper on a current topic in the field.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

495-496. Honors Tutorial.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4-8.

For seniors accepted into the Neuroscience honors research program.

Political Economy

Committee:
Stephen Ceccoli, Department of International Studies
Daniel Cullen, Department of Political Science
Marshall Gramm, Department of Economics
Teresa Beckham Gramm, Department of Economics
Robert Saxe, Department of History
John Murray, Department of Economics, Chair
Patrick Shade, Department of Philosophy
Stephen Wirls, Department of Political Science

Requirements for a Major in Political Economy

A total of 12 courses (48 credits) as follows:

  1. Economics 100 and 323; either Economics 201 or 202.
  2. International Studies 311.
  3. Political Science 110, 205, 218, 314.
  4. Political Economy 486.
  5. Tracks (choose one):
    • Global Track
      • Three electives (two of which must be outside of Economics) from Economics 310, 312; International Studies 264, 282, 310, 331, 340, 451.
    • Historical Track
      • Three electives from Economics 339; Greek and Roman Studies 270; History 255, 256, 351, 352, 436, 439.
    • Philosophical Track
      • Philosophy 301 and two electives (one of which must be outside of Political Science) from English 265 (Literature and Economics); Philosophy 255, 303, 355; Political Science 212, 214, 230, 411.
    • Policy Track
      • Either Economics 290 or Political Science 270.
      • Two electives from Economics 305, 310, 420; Political Science 209, 280, 284, 308; Psychology 309.

Course Offerings

486. Senior Seminar in Political Economy.

Spring. Credits: 4.

Senior Seminar offers students the opportunity to integrate and extend their understanding of the various areas of theory, history, politics, philosophy and policy studied as a Political Economy Major.

Prerequisites: Senior standing.

Urban Studies

Committee:
John Bass, Department of Music
Sarah Boyle, Department of Biology
Peter Hossler, Urban Studies Program
Kendra Hotz, Department of Religious Studies
Charles Hughes, Department of History
Heather Jamerson, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
Amy Jasperson, Department of Political Science
Gail Murray, Department of History
Evelyn Perry, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
Elizabeth Thomas, Department of Psychology and Director of Urban Studies

Requirements for a Major in Urban Studies

A total of forty four (44) credits as follows:

  1. Urban Studies 201: Introduction to Urban Studies
  2. Urban Studies 220: Research Methods in Urban Studies
  3. Political Science 206: Urban Politics and Policy
  4. One 4 credit course on Race and Ethnicity in the United States
    1. Race and Ethnicity in American Society (Anthropology/Sociology 331)
    2. African American History (History 242)
    3. Black Political Thought (Political Science 230)
    4. Black Theology (Religious Studies topics course)
    5. The Civil Rights Movement (History 243)
    6. Intercultural Knowledge and Competence (Urban Studies 250)
      (other courses may fulfill this requirement, but will require permission of the Director of Urban Studies)
  5. One 4 credit course that provides an Urban Field Experience
    1. Urban Studies 362: Urban Field Research
    2. Urban Studies 460: Internship
    3. Religious Studies 460: Health Equity Internship
      *Students in the Urban and Community Health Concentration must take Religious Studies 460.
  6. Urban Studies 485: Senior Seminar
  7. Urban Studies Concentration (typically five, 4 credit courses). The urban studies concentration may be student directed or may take the form of a more formal (transcripted) concentration with required courses specified below.
    *In each concentration, one course must address historical and/or comparative perspectives on the urban experience.
      1. Concentration in Urban and Community Health
        The following two courses are required as part of the concentration:
        1. Medical Sociology (Anthropology/Sociology 347) or Introduction to Urban and Community Health (Urban Studies 240)
        2. Community Psychology (Psychology 250) or Psychology of Health (Psychology 220)
          Three elective courses may be chosen from the following list. Each of the three electives must come from a different department. One of these courses must be must be taken at the 300 or 400 level (Urban Studies 460 and Urban Studies 362 do not satisfy this upper level requirement.)
          1. Geographic Information Systems (Interdepartmental 225)
          2. Biology of Medicine (Biology 105)
          3. Embryology (Biology 209)
          4. Parasitology (Biology 220)
          5. Genetics (Biology 304 with lab OR Biology 303 without lab)
          6. Molecular Biology (Biology 325)
          7. Virology/Immunology (Biology 330)
          8. Demography of Health (Anthropology/Sociology 265)
          9. Medical Sociology (Anthropology/Sociology 347)
          10. Music and Healing (Music 105)
          11. Medical Ethics (Philosophy 303)
          12. Statistical Methods (Psychology 211)
          13. Psychology of Health (Psychology 220)
          14. Community Psychology (Psychology 250)
          15. Pain, Suffering, and Death (Religious Studies 233)
          16. Faith, Health, and Justice (Religious Studies 232)
          17. Introduction to Urban and Community Health (Urban Studies 240)
          18. Urban Geography (Urban Studies 230)Global Health/Global Health Maymester (Biology 160)
          19. Note: Students who concentrate in Urban and Community Health and wish to pursue graduate study in Public Health or the medical professions should contact the Director of Health Professional Advising, in addition to working closely with an Urban Studies faculty advisor. Graduate study in Public Health, for example, typically requires the Introductory Biology Sequence and Statistics.
      2. Student-directed Concentration
        Five courses are selected from the Urban Studies Electives with the support of a faculty advisor in Urban Studies. These courses should support student interests and future goals.
        *At least one additional methods course is strongly encouraged. Only one additional methods course may count as an elective for the major.
        Additional Research Methods Courses:
        1. Introduction to GIS (Interdepartmental 225)
        2. Statistical Analysis for Economics and Business (Economics 290)
        3. Statistical Methods (Psychology 211)
        4. Urban Field Research (Urban Studies 362)
        5. Research Practicum (Urban Studies 451/452)

*No more than two electives may come from any one academic department.

*Two electives must be taken at the 300 or 400 level (Urban Studies 460 and Urban Studies 362 do not satisfy this upper level requirement)

Urban Studies Electives that are regularly offered are listed below. Urban Studies elective courses may be added during the school year, including topics courses as appropriate. During registration, check Banner Web or the Urban Studies Program office for a complete list of Urban Studies electives. Other courses may be used to fulfill the major requirement provided the courses: 1) contain an urban institutional or urban issues focus, and 2) are approved for major credit by the Director of Urban Studies.

Urban Studies Electives:

  • Race and Ethnicity in American Society (Anthropology/Sociology 331)
  • Medical Sociology (Anthropology/Sociology 347)
  • Sociology of Education (Anthropology/Sociology 341)
  • Urban Social Problems (Anthropology/Sociology 241)
  • Environmental Science (Biology 120)
  • Management of Organizations (Business 361)
  • Public Economics (Economics 305)
  • Foundations of Education (Education 201)
  • Environmental Geology (Geology 214)
  • African American History (History 242)
  • The Civil Rights Movement (History 243)
  • History of Poverty in the United States (History 249)
  • Urban History (History 205)
  • Black Political Thought (Political Science 230)
  • Community Psychology (Psychology 250)
  • Infant and Child Development (Psychology 229)
  • Health Equity Internship (Religious Studies 460)
  • Introduction to Urban and Community Health (Urban Studies 240)
  • Urban Geography (Urban Studies 230)
  • Intercultural Knowledge and Competence (Urban Studies 250)
  • Internship (Urban Studies 460)

Requirements for a Minor in Urban Studies

A total of 24 credits as follows:

  1. Introduction to Urban Studies (Urban Studies 201)
  2. Research Methods in Urban Studies (Urban Studies 220)
  3. One 4 credit course that provides an Urban Field Experience
    1. Urban Studies 362: Urban Field Research
    2. Urban Studies 460: Internship.
    3. Religious Studies 460: Health Equity Internship.

      Two of these courses may count toward the minor; only one is required. If two courses are taken, two additional courses should be selected from the urban studies curriculum rather than three courses as noted below.
  4. Three courses selected from the Urban Studies Curriculum (including Urban Studies major requirements and electives.) Two of these courses must come from fields outside of one’s major. No more than two courses may come from any one academic department. Two courses must be taken at the 300 or 400 level (the Urban Field Experiences courses do not satisfy this upper level requirement.)

Courses in the Urban Studies Major and Urban Studies Electives that are regularly offered are listed under the major. Urban Studies elective courses may be added during the school year, including topics courses as appropriate. During registration, check Banner Web or the Urban Studies Program office for a complete list of Urban Studies electives. Other courses may be used to fulfill the minor requirement provided the courses: 1) contain an urban institutional or urban issues focus, and 2) are approved for minor credit by the Director of Urban Studies.

Requirements for a Minor in Urban and Community Health

A total of 24 credits as follows:

  1. Introduction to Urban Studies (Urban Studies 201)
  2. Health Equity Internship (Religious Studies 460)
  3. Four electives courses chosen from the list below. No more than two courses may come from any one academic department. One elective course must be taken at the 300 or 400 level:
    1. Geographic Information Systems (Interdepartmental 225)
    2. Biology of Medicine (Biology 105)
    3. Embryology (Biology 209)
    4. Parasitology (Biology 220)
    5. Genetics (Biology 304 with lab OR Biology 303 without lab)
    6. Molecular Biology (Biology 325)
    7. Virology/Immunology (Biology 330)
    8. Demography of Health (Anthropology/Sociology 265)
    9. Music and Healing (Music 105)
    10. Medical Ethics (Philosophy 303)
    11. Statistical Methods (Psychology 211)
    12. Psychology of Health (Psychology 220)
    13. Community Psychology (Psychology 250)
    14. Pain, Suffering, and Death (Religious Studies 233)
    15. Faith, Health, and Justice (Religious Studies 232)
    16. Global Health/Global Health Maymester (Biology 160)

INTERNATIONAL STUDY

Many Urban Studies students spend a semester abroad and some of the courses may be eligible for Urban Studies credit. However, students must provide the program director with the course information before beginning the program. There are also some programs that are more appropriate for Urban Studies students such as IHP “Cities in the 21st Century” and DIS “Urban Studies in Europe.”

Course Offerings

201. Introduction to Urban Studies

Fall. Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F8, F11.

An interdisciplinary approach to examining issues and institutions in American cities; neighborhoods, downtowns, suburbs, housing, poverty, environmental justice, nonprofits and city politics; discussion of urban public and social policies; field trips or service learning will be used to do hands on analysis of urban issues.

220. Research Methods in Urban Studies

Fall. Credits: 4.

This course will examine different ways of undertaking urban research. One goal will be to link substantive research questions to appropriate research methods, including both qualitative and quantitative approaches. A second goal will be to develop a critical understanding of research on cities through analysis and practice.

230. Urban Geography

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4

Degree Requirements: F2i, F8

This course examines the history of urbanization from a geographic perspective. This entails an analysis of the historical development of cities and an investigation of the spatial theories utilized to understand the causes of urbanization and its impacts on everyday life. The course begins with a discussion of key concepts such as industrialization, urban political-economy, suburbanization, and the ghetto/inner city. The course then focuses on four inter-related urban processes: working in the city, governing the city, living in the city, and urban social movements. This course begins to tell a more complete story of the urban form and the way in which this mode of life continues to alter human institutions and social relations well beyond the boundaries of the city.

240. Introduction to Urban and Community Health

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4

Degree Requirements: F8

This course focuses on the production of health inequalities and the policy interventions proposed to reduce them, with an emphasis on US cities and Memphis. The course begins by examining the concept of health and its key social determinants. The remainder of the course focuses on applying these conceptual foundations to evaluate community health policies, including access to health care, obesity, gun violence, and environmental health. It uses Memphis as a case study through which to understand many of the challenges of urban health, as well as the potential policy interventions.

250. Intercultural Knowledge and Competence

Credits: 4

Degree Requirements: F9

This course focuses on helping students acquire the knowledge, attitudes, and skills necessary to interact effectively in diverse cultural contexts. Multiple pedagogical strategies are used to foster student growth including: (1) exposing students to interdisciplinary scholarship that contextualizes the experiences of people from diverse cultural backgrounds, (2) requiring students to continually reflect on how their own cultural identities have influenced their values, beliefs, and worldviews, and (3) providing multiple opportunities for students to practice and enhance their intercultural competence skills. Although the course focuses primarily on the experiences of diverse cultural groups within the US, the skills learned should be transferable across multiple contexts.

362. Urban Field Research

Spring. Credits: 4.

This course provides the opportunity for students to integrate academic understandings, research skills, and community based learning. Students, faculty, and community partners design and conduct field research addressing an urban challenge or issue.

Prerequisites: Two courses in Urban Studies or Urban Studies electives. Research Methods in Urban Studies preferred.

451/452: Research Practicum In Urban Studies: Research Practicum in Urban Studies

Fall, Spring. Credits: 1-4.

Students will work on a research project under the close supervision of a faculty member. Only 4 practicum credits may count toward the major. This is a pass/fail course.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

460. Urban Studies Internship

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F11.

A directed internship with an urban, social, governmental, or nonprofit agency. The courses integrate traditional academic work in Urban Studies with practical internship experience.

Prerequisites: Two courses in Urban Studies or Urban Studies electives.

485. Senior Seminar in Urban Studies

Spring. Credits: 4.

An investigation of subject areas in the discipline of Urban Studies that involves research collaboration between students and faculty.

Interdisciplinary Majors

Students interested in interdisciplinary study are encouraged to consider interdisciplinary majors. The following interdisciplinary majors have been approved by the Faculty, and the required courses have been defined as listed below. Students who wish to declare any of these established interdisciplinary majors may do so by filing the normal Declaration of Major form with the Office of the Registrar. Any deviation from the program of study outlined in the description must be approved by the chairpersons of the departments involved.

Biomathematics

  1. Required Mathematics and Computer Science courses (24 credits):
    1. Math 121, 122 (Calculus Sequence) + 251 (Differential Equations)
    2. CS 141 (Computer Science I: Programming Fundamentals)
    3. Math 214 (Discrete Math Modeling with Biological Applications)
    4. Math 315 (Continuous Math Modeling with Biological Applications)
  2. Required Biology courses (14 credits) :
    1. Biology 130, 131L, 140, 141L (Intro Bio Sequence)
    2. One of the following three courses:
      1. Biology 200 + 201L (Evolution)
      2. Biology 304 + 304L (Genetics)
      3. Biology 315 + 315L (Ecology)
  3. Math Electives (8 credits): Select 2 courses from the following list in consultation with the advisor (at least one at the 300 or 400 level):
    1. Math 201 (Transition to Advanced Math)
    2. Math 223 (Multivariable Calculus)
    3. Math 261 (Linear Algebra)
    4. Math 311 (Probability Theory)
    5. Math 312 (Math Statistics)
    6. Math 321 (Real Analysis)
    7. Math 352 (Partial Differential Equations)
    8. Math 465 (Special Topics when appropriate)
    9. CS 142 (Computer Science II: Object-Oriented Programming)
  4. Biology Electives (14 credits): Select 3 courses from the following list in consultation with the advisor (2 must have a lab):
    1. Biology courses at the 200 or 300 level [Biology 307 (Cell Biology) may combine with BCMB 310 (Methods in Cell Biology and Biochemistry) to satisfy a lab elective]
    2. Chemistry 414 (Biochemistry) [may combine with BCMB 310 (Methods in Cell Biology and Biochemistry) to satisfy a lab elective]
    3. Chemistry 416 (Mechanisms of Drug Action)
    4. Neuroscience 270 (Neuroscience) [may combine with Neuroscience 350 (Neuroscience Research Methods) to satisfy a lab elective]
  5. Senior Research (4 credits):
    Normally, students will have two advisors: one who advises the mathematical component of their senior research and one who advises the biological component of their research. Each student will take three semesters of seminar, one the spring of their junior year (1 credit), and one each semester of their senior year (2 credits fall, 1 credit spring).
    1. Math 386 (Junior Sem), 485-486 (Senior Seminar)
  6. Recommended Courses:
    1. If considering grad school in Ecology it is strongly recommended that students take Bio 315, CS 142, and Math 311.
    2. If considering grad school in Mathematics, Biomathematics, or Mathematical Ecology it is strongly recommended that students take Math 201, 261, and 321.
    3. Students should consider Bio 160, Bio 214, or EnvS 160 as a means of fulfilling their F-11 requirement.
    4. Physics 111 + 111L (Fundamentals in Physics I) as appropriate to career goals
    5. Some classes that may be of interest:
    6. Economics 407 (Game Theory)
    7. Geology 116 (Global Environmental Change)
    8. History 105 (Special Topics: Disease & Epidemics) F2i, F3
    9. History 270 (Global Environmental History) F3, F11
    10. History 374 (Nature & War) F3
    11. History 472 (Environmental Justice) F11
    12. International Studies 340, 341 (Global Ecopolitics, Comparative Ecopolitics) F8
    13. International Studies 375 (Population and National Security) F2i
    14. Philosophy 302 (Environmental Ethics)
    15. Philosophy 303 (Medical Ethics) F1

Economics/Commerce and Business

A total of sixty-four (64) credits as follows:

  1. Economics 100, 201, 202, 290, 420, 486.
  2. Business 241, 243, 351, 361, 371, 486.
  3. Four credits from Economics 250, 265, 305, 310, 311, 312, 317, 318, 323, 331, 339, 345, 349, 360, 407 465.
  4. One course from each of two of the following areas:
    1. Accounting: Business 341.
    2. Finance: Business 452, 454, 485.
    3. Management: Business 462, 463, 464, 466.
    4. Marketing: Business 472, 473, 485.
    5. Business 483.
  5. Mathematics 115 or 121.
  6. Recommended: Mathematics 107; Philosophy 304; Political Science 218; Interdisciplinary 240.

Economics and International Studies

A total of 15-16 courses (60-64 credits) as follows:

  1. Economics 100, 201, 202, 290, 310, 312; either Economics 486 or International Studies 485.
  2. Economics 407 or 420.
  3. International Studies 100, 190, 200, 300, plus one two-course sequence (other than 210-312.)
  4. Mathematics 115 or 121.
  5. An appropriate foreign language through completion of the second year (202.)

History and International Studies

A total of 12-13 courses (48-52 credits) as follows:

  1. History 300, and two additional courses from the following: 207, 215, 216, 217, 224, 225, 232, 233, 255, 256, 261, 262, 267, 275, 276, 281, 283, 288, 294.
  2. International Studies 100, 200, 300.
  3. Economics 100.
  4. A total of four additional courses, two in each department. Students must choose one of the following concentrations:
    1. Europe: History: 327, 395, 427, 428, 429; I.S. 281, 282, 283, 284, 285.
    2. Africa/Middle East: History 375, 395, 475; I.S. 243, 244, 245, 251, 252, 253
    3. Asia: History 391, 395, 481; I.S. 260, 261, 262, 263, 264, 395.
    4. Latin America: History 363, 364, 365; I.S. 273-274.
  5. I.S. 485. Senior paper to be written under the direction of one faculty member from each department. The senior paper should pertain to the student’s concentration.
  6. An appropriate foreign language through completion of the second year (202.)

Qualified students wishing to pursue Honors can do so by fulfilling the requirements of the interdisciplinary major and of the Honors Tutorial in either department.

Political Science and International Studies

A total of 12 courses (48 credits) as follows:

  1. International Studies: Two of the following: 100, 190, 200; both of the following: 300 and one two-course sequence.
  2. Political Science: 151, 340, 360; one of the following: 212, 214, 218, 314; and one additional course. (POLS 262,263, 264, do not count toward the Political Science and International Studies Interdisciplinary major.)
  3. Economics 100.
  4. International Studies 485 or Political Science 485.
  5. An appropriate foreign language through completion of the second year (202.)

Mathematics and Economics

A total of 15 courses (60 credits) as follows:

  1. Economics 100, 201, 202, 290, 407, 420.
  2. One course from Economics 305, 310, 331.
  3. Mathematics 121, 122, 201, 223, 251, 261.
  4. Mathematics 311 or 321.
  5. Economics 486 or Mathematics 485 and 486. Senior projects must have a faculty reader from both departments. The final presentation of the senior project must be made in the Senior Seminars of both departments.

Qualified students wishing to pursue Honors can do so by fulfilling the requirements of the interdisciplinary major and of the Honors Tutorial in either department.

Mathematics and economics majors seeking admission to graduate programs in economics, operations research, statistics, or mathematical finance are advised to also take Mathematics 312, Mathematics 431, Computer Science 141, Computer Science 142, and possibly Business 351.

Music and Psychology

A total of 16 courses (64 credits) as follows:

  1. Music Courses (6 courses, 8 performance credits = two 4-credit courses):
    1. Theory & Musicianship: MUSC 204, MUSC 205, MUSC 206.
    2. History & Literature: 1 course from MUSC 227 or MUSC 228.
    3. Performance:
      1. 4 semester of large ensembles (MUSC 190-194; 197= 1 credit each.)
      2. 4 semesters of lessons (MUSC 160-178 = 1 credit each.)
      3. 4 semesters of Performance Attendance (MUSC 100 = 0 credits.)
    4. Electives: Two 4-credit courses
      1. One music cognition/therapy topic course (MUSC 140-149 or MUSC 340-349.)
      2. Other courses should be selected from the following recommended list:
        1. MUSC 103 – Elements of Music.
        2. MUSC 117-119; 105 [F9] – World Music courses.
        3. MUSC 227-228 [F3] – European Musical Heritage courses.
        4. MUSC 414-415 – Conducting I & II. (applied concentration)
        5. MUSC 222 – Music Technology. (cognition concentration)
        6. MUSC 306 [F6] – Mathematical Musical Analysis.
  2. Psychology Courses (7 courses):
    1. Foundational Psychology Courses: PSYC 150, PSYC 200, PSYC 211.
    2. Perception: PSYC 216
    3. Advanced Research Methods: 1 course from PSYC 350-353.
    4. Two other courses chosen from one concentration:
      1. Cognition:
        1. PSYC 306 – Language and Communication.
        2. PSYC 327 – Cognitive Processes.
        3. PSYC 345 – Cognitive Neuroscience.
        4. PSYC 451-452 – Research Practicum. (4 credits)
        5. NEURO 270 – Neuroscience.
        6. NEURO 318 – Neuroscience of Brain Disorders.
      2. Applied:
        1. PSYC 220 – Psychology of Health.
        2. PSYC 222 – Educational Psychology.
        3. PSYC 224 – Psychological Disorders.
        4. PSYC 229 [F11] – Developmental Psychology: Infant and Childhood.
        5. PSYC 230 – Adolescent Development.
        6. PSYC 311 – Counseling Psychology.
        7. PSYC 326 – Learning and Motivation.
        8. PSYC 451-452 – Research Practicum. (4 credits)
  3. 3. Senior Experience (4 credits)
    1. Either MUSC 485-486 or PSYC 485 as recommended by advisor and topic availability. The culminating Senior Seminar research project is required to integrate the fields of Music and Psychology.
    2. Other suggested courses to complement this course of study include:
      1. EDUC 201 - Foundations of Education
      2. EDUC 460 [F11] – Internship in Education.
      3. FYWS 151 [F2s] – American Music and Politics.
      4. MUSC 160-178 – Lessons. Four additional semesters of lessons and ensembles are recommended. (especially guitar and/or voice for applied/therapy track)
      5. MUSC 190-198 – Ensembles.
      6. PHIL 270 [F11] – Philosophy of Education.
      7. PHIL 328 – Philosophy of Mind and Consciousness.
      8. PHYS 107 [F7] – Physics of Sound and Music.
      9. PSYC 338 – Psychological Assessment.
      10. PSYC 460 – Internship in Psychology.
      11. PSYC 495-496 – Honors Tutorial.
      12. 460 [F11] Other Internship.

Russian Studies and International Studies

A total of 16 courses (64 credits) as follows:

  1. Russian 202, 205, 410, 486.
  2. Two of the following: RUS 301, 302, 309.
  3. One course from: RUS 212, 215, or 255.
  4. International Studies 100, 190, 200, 300, 485.
  5. Two of the following: IS 284, IS 285, HIS 229.
  6. Economics 100.
  7. Political Science 151 or 214.

Self-Designed Interdisciplinary Majors

The option of a self-designed interdisciplinary major is available for those students whose academic goals may best be achieved by combining and integrating the work of two or more academic departments. Like the College’s other interdisciplinary programs, the self-designed interdisciplinary major exists to provide an appropriate structure for programs of study that do not fit within the bounds of existing departments and require an interdisciplinary approach.

The majors currently offered by the College’s academic departments and interdisciplinary programs are carefully designed and rigorously reviewed by the faculty for intellectual depth and coherence. Students who wish to propose a self-designed course of study should expect that their proposals will be held to the same standards. The self-designed interdisciplinary major petition process therefore requires a significant amount of time and reflection. Students wishing to pursue this option will work closely with their advising faculty in the relevant departments to construct their proposal and to see their study through to completion.

Students who wish to pursue a self-designed interdisciplinary major must complete the required “Declaration of Interdisciplinary Major” form. In completing that form, students should follow the steps below in order to meet the rigorous criteria for the proposed program of study.

  1. Consult with faculty members in the departments that will be combined in the major to determine the feasibility of the interdisciplinary major. Consultation with the Registrar is also recommended in order to secure an understanding of the approval procedure.
  2. Prepare, in consultation with those faculty members and departments, a petition requesting the College Faculty’s approval of the interdisciplinary major. This petition is addressed to the Chairperson of the Faculty Educational Program Committee. The petition must contain the following items:
    1. An essay that articulates the student’s rationale for the interdisciplinary major. Simply explaining how courses in different departments are related is not a sufficient rationale. The rationale must specifically explain why the academic goals of the self-designed major cannot be achieved through a combination of majors and minor(s). The petitioner must demonstrate that only by integrating work in the departments can those academic goals be realized. The importance of this essay cannot be overemphasized. It is not only a statement of the student’s reasons for choosing the proposed interdisciplinary major, but also a philosophical and practical statement of (i) how the new major meets the same rigorous standards as the College’s already-existing majors, (ii) how the proposed course-plan will include truly “interdisciplinary” study, (iii) how, if there are similar programs or majors at other comparable institutions, the proposed plan for interdisciplinary study compares to those.
    2. The Declaration of Interdisciplinary Major, including a complete listing of courses that comprise the interdisciplinary major, with numbers, titles, and dates when the courses are to be taken. Though it is customary that the number of courses in each department will be fewer than what is expected of a major in that department, it is essential that substantial advanced work is done in each department. The proposed program of study must include a complete description of how the “interdisciplinary” senior experience will be structured. It must be clear how the departments involved in the major will be integrated into the senior seminar, seminars, or capstone experience. Any self-designed capstone experience should be explained in detail and should be comparable in content, rigor, and methodology to the capstone experiences for existing majors.
  3. The Declaration of Interdisciplinary Major must be endorsed in writing by the chairpersons of the concerned departments. This endorsement must include a detailed assessment of the student’s rationale and of the student’s ability to undertake and complete successfully the work projected in the petition. The departmental endorsements should also specify who will serve as the principal faculty advisor for the student. If the student’s petition includes coursework or other projects outside of the participating departments’ normal course offerings, the chairpersons should also note their awareness of those elements of the proposal and give assurances that those or comparable opportunities will be available for the student.
  4. The entire Declaration of Interdisciplinary Major with the completed petition is submitted to the Registrar for review before it is sent to the Education Program Committee for a full review and final determination. Incomplete Declarations will be returned to the student without review.
  5. Interdisciplinary majors must be declared and receive approval no later than midterm of the spring semester of the junior year. It is expected that work on the petition, interviews with faculty, and consultation with the Registrar should begin as early as possible, but will take place no later than the fall semester of the junior year. The student who submits an interdisciplinary major petition will have already declared a major by midterm of the spring semester of the sophomore year. If the interdisciplinary major can be worked out in time for the sophomore year deadline for declaring a major, it should be submitted earlier.
  6. Any proposed deviation from an approved interdisciplinary major must have departmental approvals and the approval of the Education Program Committee before changes are made in the course of study.

First-Year Writing Seminar

The First-Year Writing Seminars (FYWS) are offered by different departments across the curriculum and fulfill the first component of the F2 Requirement.

Director of College Writing: Rebecca Finlayson, Department of English

151. First-Year Writing Seminar.

Fall, Spring. Credits 4.

Degree Requirement: F2s.

A course that develops the ability to read and think critically, to employ discussion and writing as a means of exploring and refining ideas, and to express those ideas in effective prose. Individual sections of the course will explore different topics in reading, discussion, and writing. Topics are selected by individual professors and are designed to help students develop transferable skills of analysis and argumentation, applicable to the various disciplines of the liberal arts and sciences. Several papers will be required, at least one of which will involve use of the library and proper documentation. The seminar will emphasize successive stages of the writing process, including prewriting, drafting, and revision, and will provide feedback from classmates and the instructor. Students may not take both FYWS 151 and FYWS 155.

155. First-Year Writing Seminar: Daily Themes.

Fall, Spring. Credits 4.

Degree Requirement: F2s.

An alternative to FYWS 151 offered to outstanding first-year writers, by invitation from the Director of College Writing. The course is limited to 12 students who meet as a class once a week and individually with the instructor or in small groups with the Writing Fellow once a week. Students will turn in 4 one-page themes each week. Some research will be required, and students will use their daily themes as the basis for two longer papers: one at mid term and the other at the end of the semester. Students may not take both FYWS 151 and FYWS 155.

Humanities

The Life program and the Search program described below offer alternative ways to fulfill the F1 Requirement in the College’s Foundation requirements.

Life: Then and Now.

Staff:
Thomas Bremer, Department of Religious Studies
Kyle R. Grady, Department of Philosophy
Patrick Gray, Department of Religious Studies
Stephen R. Haynes, Department of Religious Studies
Kendra G. Hotz, Department of Religious Studies
Luther D. Ivory, Department of Religious Studies, Director
John C. Kaltner, Department of Religious Studies
Steven L. McKenzie, Department of Religious Studies
Bernadette McNary-Zak, Department of Religious Studies
Milton C. Moreland, Department of Religious Studies
Mark W. Muesse, Department of Religious Studies
Mark P. Newman, Department of Philosophy
Susan Satterfield, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
Patrick A. Shade, Department of Philosophy
David Sick, Department of Greek and Roman Studies

In the first two courses of the Life: Then and Now program, the student is introduced to the major methodological approaches to the study of religion represented in the “Life” curriculum. The student selects the last course from a range of courses that apply these specific methodological approaches to different aspects of religion. Fuller course descriptions may be found in the departmental listings.

Religious Studies 101. The Bible: Texts and Contexts.

First Semester, First Year. Credits: 4.

The first in a two-course sequence that introduces the “Life” curriculum, this course focuses on introducing students to the academic study of the Bible. Students survey representative texts from each genre of biblical writing in the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible and the New Testament. Particular attention is paid to understanding the role of historical and cultural context in shaping biblical views on theological issues (God, sin and evil, Jesus’ significance, e.g.)

Religious Studies 102. The Bible: Texts and Contexts.

Second Semester, First Year. Credits: 4.

This course continues the introduction to the “Life” sequence begun in Religious Studies 101 by examining the development of central themes in the Christian theological tradition. The course begins with classical figures from the early and medieval periods, and follows the impact of modernity on Christian thought. The course concludes with major theological developments in the 20th and 21st centuries, including the advent of the comparative study of religion.

Final Courses.

The concluding courses in the “Life” curriculum allow the student to focus in particular areas of the study of religion or philosophy. See the departmental listings under “Religious Studies,” “Philosophy,” and “Greek and Roman Studies” for specific courses in the Life curriculum.

The Search for Values in the Light of Western History and Religion.

Staff:
Geoffrey Bakewell, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
Hannah Barker, Department of History
Rachel Bauer, Department of Modern Languages
Elizabeth Bridges, Department of Modern Languages
Daniel E. Cullen, Department of Political Science
Lori Garner, Department of English
Scott Garner, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
Kyle Grady, Department of Philosophy
Patrick Gray, Department of Religious Studies
Rhiannon Graybill, Department of Religious Studies
Judith P. Haas, Department of English
Stephen R. Haynes, Department of Religious Studies
Kendra G. Hotz, Department of Religious Studies
Timothy Huebner, Department of History
Jeffrey H. Jackson, Department of History
Joseph Jansen, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
Jonathan Judaken, Department of History
Ariel Lopez, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
Laura Loth, Department of Modern Languages
David Mason, Department of Theatre
Bernadette McNary-Zak, Department of Religious Studies
Milton C. Moreland, Department of Religious Studies
Kenneth S. Morrell, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
Gail S. Murray, Department of History
John Murray, Department of Economics
Michael Nelson, Department of Political Science
Scott Newstok, Department of English
Valeria Z. Nollan, Department of Modern Languages
Vanessa Rogers, Department of Music
Susan Satterfield, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
Patrick Shade, Department of Philosophy
David H. Sick, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
Francesca Tronchin, Department of Art and Art History
Daniel Ullucci, Department of Religious Studies
Stephen H. Wirls, Department of Political Science

Humanities 101-102-201. The Search for Values in the Light of Western History and Religion.

Fall-Spring-Fall. Credits: 4-4-4.

Degree Requirements: F1.

The Search for Values in the Light of Western History and Religion is an interdisciplinary study of the ideas, beliefs, and cultural developments that have formed Western culture. The first two courses of the sequence are taken in the fall (Humanities 101) and spring (Humanities 102) semesters of the first year. In these courses, students examine original documents in translation from the history and literature of the Israelites, the Greeks, the Romans, and the early Christians. Selected texts from the Hebrew Bible are read and discussed in conjunction with the ideas and themes of Mesopotamian and Greek culture. Students study the Gospels and selected letters from the New Testament in conjunction with Hellenistic and Roman history, life, and thought.

In the third semester of the sequence, students trace the roles of biblical and classical heritages in the shaping of the values, character, and institutions of Western culture and its understanding of self and world.

To this end, they read and discuss selections from the works of philosophers, theologians, political theorists, scientists, and literary artists from the Renaissance to the present. Courses in the second year are organized by discipline or other theme. Choices include biology, classical studies, history, literature, music, philosophy, politics, religious studies, and theatre.

Prerequisites: Humanities 101 is a prerequisite for Humanities 102. Humanities 102 is a prerequisite for Humanities 201. These prerequisites may be satisfied alternatively by the permission of the instructor.

Interdisciplinary Course Offerings

225. Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirement: F6

This course introduces students to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) through the analysis of spatial data. Students use deductive reasoning and logic to interpret data, draw conclusions based on numerical and spatial data, learn spatial statistics, and examine the different ways to represent data. Students also learn to construct, run and apply spatial models. An emphasis is made on the application of GIS to real-world situations.

240. Public Speaking

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.

This course provides students with frequent opportunities to practice oral communication skills. Students study the fundamentals of healthy and efficient voice production, as well as the use of the voice and body as instruments of expression and persuasion.

322. Geographic Information Systems Research Seminar.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 1-3.

This course is designed for students who have already been introduced to the analytical tools of GIS. Students will undertake a research project under the supervision of one of the faculty teaching this course. The research project will culminate in a paper and presentation. The seminar will meet in an ongoing basis to exchange ideas, report on progress, and share potential sources of information.

331. Theory and Practice of Scholarship Grant Writing.

Spring. Credits: 1.

This course is a workshop designed to assist students in the theoretical and practical aspects of writing successful grants for post-graduate scholarships and other competitive opportunities. Students learn about the various options available, read scholarly literature on grant writing, develop strategies for writing proposals and give and receive criticism on proposals and projects. By the conclusion of the course, students are prepared to compete for national postgraduate scholarships.

485, 486. Interdisciplinary Senior Seminar.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4.

This course is intended for the student who is pursuing an interdisciplinary, self-designed major. In the event that the student is unable to unify the senior seminar experiences of the departments involved in the major or to take each of the department’s senior seminars, the Interdisciplinary Senior Seminar will be utilized to serve as the culminating experience for the major. It is intended to be an experience that will show both a breadth and a depth of knowledge in the integration of the departments, requiring both written and oral work.




PLEASE NOTE: This document reflects information as it was published in the 2014-15 Rhodes Catalogue. You may find more current information elsewhere on rhodes.edu.