2007 Rhodes Institute Fellows and Papers

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Lindsey Cloud will examine the preservation of musical culture in Depression-era Memphis through the work of the Federal Music Project, a division of the Works Progress Administration.
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Brian Darrith will explore the influence of religious themes on traditional and contemporary blues music.
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Sarah Eldridge will investigate the musical compositions of Burnet C. Tuthill, founder of the Memphis Symphony Orchestra.
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Matthew Horton will examine the work of faith-based non-profit organizations in Memphis, particularly the Hollywood-Springdale community.
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Amber James is one of three students who will analyze Civil Rights-era photographs from the Memphis World, the first black-operated newspaper in Memphis, in conjunction with an upcoming exhibition at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art.

Brittany Jenkins is one of three students who will analyze Civil Rights-era photographs from the Memphis World, the first black-operated newspaper in Memphis, in conjunction with an upcoming exhibition at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art.

Stephanie Juchs will engage in an ecological assessment of greenspace within the Hollywood-Springdale community and, more broadly, investigate the role of greenspaces in disadvantaged communities.
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Eva Krug is one of three students who will analyze Civil Rights-era photographs from the Memphis World, the first black-operated newspaper in Memphis, in conjunction with an upcoming exhibition at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art.

Catherine Lawson will explore the phenomenon of student-led kneel-ins at Second Presbyterian Church in Memphis within the context of student efforts to desegregate churches throughout the South.
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Thorne Maginnis will examine the 1999 political debate over the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act through documents housed at the William J. Clinton Presidential Library in Little Rock, Arkansas.
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Ethan McClelland will utilize archaeological, cartographical, and documentary evidence to investigate the impact of the Civil War at Ames Plantation.
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Cord McLean will research the significant contribution of Memphis gospel quartet music in African-American culture. Link to paper in PDF format

Avery Pribila will explore the role of slave quarters in fostering an autonomous slave culture at Ames Plantation. Link to paper in PDF format

Kacie Ross will engage in an ecological assessment of greenspace within the Hollywood-Springdale community and, more broadly, investigate the role of greenspaces in disadvantaged communities.
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Anthony Siracusa will study the Rev. James M. Lawson Jr.’s work as a civil rights activist between his arrival in Memphis in 1962 and the Sanitation Strike of 1968.
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Dustin Sump will examine the pre-Civil War era economic relationships among small farmers, large plantation owners, landless whites, and enslaved African Americans on the Ames Plantation land base.
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Lauren Tull will research the formation and passage of the 1994 Violence Against Women Act through documents housed at the William J. Clinton Presidential Library in Little Rock, Arkansas.
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Daniel Vanaman will study the controversy surrounding the desegregation of Second Presbyterian Church in Memphis during the Civil Rights era and how this event led to the formation of Independent Presbyterian Church.
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Laura Vansickle will investigate the stylistic distinctiveness of Memphis’s rap music and its place in the city’s musical culture and history.
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