2005 Rhodes Institute for Regional Studies

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Timothy S. Huebner, Associate Professor of History, is the founder and director of the Rhodes Institute for Regional Studies. A specialist in the constitutional and legal history of the American South, Professor Huebner brings expertise in the areas of local, state, and regional history. Author of The Southern Judicial Tradition: State Judges and Sectional Distinctiveness, 1790-1890 (1999) and The Taney Court: Justices, Rulings, Legacy (2003), Prof. Huebner is co-editor of the University of Georgia Press’s Studies in the Legal History of the South series. In 2004, he received the Clarence Day Award for Outstanding Teaching and was named Tennessee Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Endowment for the Advancement of Teaching. His regional research interests include Memphis during the mid-nineteenth century.

He mentored the following fellows during the summer of 2005:

Anita A. Davis, Associate Professor of Psychology, teaches a variety of courses ranging from Counseling Psychology and Psychological Assessment to research courses on Adolescent Motherhood and Evaluating Community Interventions. She has published articles in the Journal of Research on Adolescence, the Journal of Adolescent Research, and the Journal of Community Psychology. Professor Davis has received the Black Student Association’s Outstanding Alumni Award and the Ira Samelson Jr. Boys and Girls Club of Memphis’ Outstanding Volunteer of the Year Award for her active engagement in community activities. Her current research focuses on exploring how educational, social service, and community-based organizations are working to enhance the life experiences and outcomes for culturally diverse members of the Memphis community.

She mentored the following fellows during the summer of 2005:

Teresa Beckham Gramm, Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics and Business Administration, co-directed research projects with her husband, Marshall Gramm. A member of the Rhodes faculty since 1999, Professor Teresa Gramm’s fields of specialization are International Economics and Econometrics, and her primary research area is Empirical International Trade. Prof. Gramm writes on the relationship between labor mobility and international trade, LDC national income and quality specialization, and empirical testing of theoretical trade models. She has taught courses on Economic Development, International Economics, Econometrics, Money and Banking, and Macroeconomics. Her regional research interests include the relationship between income distribution and growth and the returns to education in the regional labor market.


Marshall Gramm, Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics and Business Administration, co-directed research projects with his wife, Professor Teresa Beckham Gramm. Professor Gramm’s general fields include Public Economics and Labor Economics, and he has written papers on rent seeking, banking regulation, market efficiency, and the Free Silver Movement in America. His articles have been published in Public Choice, the Journal of Economic History, and Applied Economics Letters. A member of the Rhodes faculty since 2000, he has taught courses on Public Economics, Econometrics, and Macroeconomics. His regional research interests include the relationship between income distribution and growth and the returns to education in the regional labor market.

They mentored the following fellows during the summer of 2005:


Stephen R. Haynes, Associate Professor in the Department of Religious Studies, teaches a variety of courses including Holocaust, Religion and Racism, Religion and Education, and Religion and Literature. He is the author or editor of nine books, including Reluctant Witnesses: Jews and the Christian Imagination (1995), Noah’s Curse: The Biblical Justification for American Slavery (2002), and The Bonhoeffer Phenomenon: Portraits of a Protestant Saint (2004). He serves on the Church Relations Council of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum and was director of the Rhodes Consultation on the Future of the Church-Related College between 1995 and 2004. In 1997 he received the Clarence Day Award for Outstanding Research, and in 2001 he was awarded the Clarence Day Award for Outstanding Teaching. Prof. Haynes has research interests in the impact of religion on education, culture, and society in the region.

He mentored the following fellows during the summer of 2005:

Timothy Sharp is the Elizabeth Daughdrill Chair in Fine Arts and director of Rhodes Singers and MasterSingers Chorale. Professor Sharp returns to Rhodes in the summer of 2005 after a year as Visiting Fellow at Cambridge University, where he continued historical research on late eighteenth-century vocal music and sang as a Lay Clerk at King′s College. Dr. Sharp writes a standing column for Choral Journal, and his recent book publications include Achieving Choral Balance and Blend and Collaborative Creativity. His regional research interests include archival projects with The Blues Foundation in Memphis, German musical migration to the Mid-South, and working with the Memphis Regional Chamber of Commerce to develop a “cultural corridor” in West Tennessee.

He mentored the following fellows during the summer of 2005:

Carla D. Shirley is Assistant Professor of Anthropology/Sociology and director of the Urban Studies program. Her fields of specialization are race, gender, and class. Most recently, Professor Shirley researched the ways that class and gender impact how southern whites construct a range of white identities. She has taught courses in Research Methods, Race/Ethnic Relations, Gender and Society, Urban Social Problems, and Sociology of Education. As part of a Rhodes College Urban Studies team, she recently received a Community Outreach Partnership grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to do research and community development in the Hollywood-Springdale community. Her regional interests include public education issues in Memphis, and she is currently working with schools in the Hollywood-Springdale area.

She mentored the following fellows during the summer of 2005: