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Nonfiction

The Old Testament: Its Background, Growth, & Content
By Steven L. McKenzie, Professor of Religious Studies, and John Kaltner, Associate Professor of Religious Studies. Nashville: Abingdon Press; 382 pp. $32
McKenzie and Kaltner explain the Old Testament and critical methods for reading it. Each chapter discusses a biblical book through content, growth, context and interpretation.

A Scratch with the Rebels: A Pennsylvania Roundhead and a South Carolina Cavalier
By Carolyn Schriber, Professor Emerita of History. Chicora, PA: Mechling Book Bindery; 206 pp. $24.95
The author blends the personal stories of two opposing soldiers in the American Civil War Battle of Secessionville.

Reasoning in Biological Discoveries: Mechanisms, Interfield Relations, and Anomaly Resolution
By Lindley Darden ′68. New York: Cambridge University Press; 360 pp. $75
This collection is divided into three sections, with the author explaining the role of mechanisms in biological discovery. Essays focus on such themes as historical and philosophical issues at play in discussions of biological mechanisms and the problem of developing and refining reasoning strategies.

The Seven Deadly Sins (Against the Golden Rule)
By George Abraham ’67. Charleston, SC: BookSurge Publishing; 278 pp. $18.99
This metaphoric and allegoric self-help guide combines work ethics with business management. Abraham works his way through the seven deadly sins as they surface in the American corporate environment.

Fiction

The Architect
By Jim Williamson ′68. Brentwood, TN: Cold Tree Press; 376 pp. $16.95
Struggling architect Ethan Cotham wins a prestigious competition to design the new Center for Southern Culture on the banks of the Mississippi River, but his unconventional ideas are under attack by a former mentor and the Memphis Board of Design Review. Cotham soon suspects his plans are being undermined by a St. Louis construction manager.



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